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The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Elders At The Well
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Celebrations
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Clean Water
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Happy Community
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Happy Kids
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Ladies Splashing
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Sunging And Dancing
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Thankful Elders
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Celebrations
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Celebrations
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Celebrations
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Celebrations
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Celebrations
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Celebrations
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Celebrations
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Celebrations
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Dignitary With Community
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Dignitary With Community
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Happy Comunity
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Isatu Celebrating
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Isatu Celebrating
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Isatu Celebrating
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Kadiatu Celebrating
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Kadiatu Celebrating
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Kadiatu Celebrating
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Drilling
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Drilling
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Drilling
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Drilling
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Drilling
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Drilling
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Drilling
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Drilling
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Drilling
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Drilling
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Yield Test
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Yield Test
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Pad Construction
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Pad Construction
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Pad Construction
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Chlorination
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Bad Hygiene
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Bad Hygiene
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Bad Hygiene
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Bad Hygiene
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Bad Hygiene
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Balance Diet
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Causes Of Tooth Decay
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Disease Transmission
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Handwashing
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Healthy Vs Unhealthy Community
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Hygiene Training
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Hygiene Training
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Hygiene Training
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Hygiene Training
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Hygiene Training
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Hygiene Training
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Hygiene Training
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Hygiene Training
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Hygiene Training
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Hygiene Training
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Importance Of Bathing
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Importance Of Breastfeeding
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Importance Of Clothesline
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Importance Of Latrine
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Importance Of Mosquito Net
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Mosquito Net
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Toothbrush Contamination
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Water User Committee
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Water Users Committee
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Worms And Parasites
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Finished Water Point
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Finished Water Point
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Water Flowing
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Inside Kitchen
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Dish Rack
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Collecting Water
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Bath Shelter
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Water Source
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Animal House
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Dish Rack
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Clothesline
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Woman Hanging Clothes
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Abdulai K
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Latrine
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Woman Carrying Water
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Dish Rack
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Mosque
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Animal House
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Clothesline
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Latrine
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Kitchen
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Landscape
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Animal House
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Household
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Household
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Landscape
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Kitchen
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Abdulai K
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Abu Kanu
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Carrying Water
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Woman Collecting Water
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Abdulai Carrying Water
The Water Project: Royeamp Community -  Bath Shelter

Project Status



Project Type:  Borehole Well and Hand Pump

Regional Program: Port Loko, Sierra Leone WaSH Program

Impact: 180 Served

Project Phase:  In Service - Sep 2022

Functionality Status:  Functional

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



Any one of the 180 community members fetching water in Royeamp village (including children as young as four years old) needs to carry a large stick and sing loudly the whole way in an attempt to scare away poisonous snakes lurking in the tall grasses. Some families live an hour away from the swamp scoophole that serves as this community’s only source of water, and yet most households must make multiple trips a day to meet their daily drinking, cooking, and cleaning needs.

When we first visited the water source, a group of children helped us navigate there, and one of the boys drank from the swamp without hesitation, which was a painful sight to see. Worms, frogs, tadpoles, and fish inhabit the scoophole, and it is lined with grass, mud, and algae. It is surrounded by farmland, whose fertilizers seep into the water. Even though there is water throughout the year, the amount and quality both diminish in the dry season.

The water has a permanent milky white sheen from the clay in the soil; no amount of sieving will clear it. Even when the water is at its clearest, the community members leave their containers out for the dirt to settle to the bottom and any mistakenly scooped tadpoles to escape.

Unsurprisingly, drinking this water causes many health problems for the people in this community, including cholera, typhoid, dysentery, diarrhea, and amoeba. They also said drinking the fertilizer in the water has led to a steadily increasing rate of cancer within the area.

“We have had to deal with the loss of loved ones very often in our village,” explained Abu Kanu, a 42-year-old farmer, charcoal burner, and the village’s second headman. “Only a small amount of water comes to the village because of the distance. The old and young suffer greatly because they have to beg people to fetch a bucket of water for them.”

Abu told us organizations and politicians have made promises to the people of Royeamp to provide them with a source of clean water, but none of them have followed through. One group even asked for payment up-front to provide Royeamp with a water source. Because the villagers had no money, they sacrificed bags of rice. “To date, nothing has happened,” Abu said.

“I am very disappointed in the fact that nobody has ever thought about helping us all these years,” Abu said. “The first time this organization came to my village, I must admit, I was very upset. Instead of welcoming them, I told them to wait for the first headman because I have had enough of the lies.”

Abu’s 17-year-old son, Abdulai, no longer attends school since he has found a job driving a motorbike taxi. But if he’d had a choice, it wouldn’t have happened that way.

“I dropped out of school a long time ago,” Abdulai explained. “I needed to make money. I needed to help with the household affairs. Most of the children have been moved to other villages to avoid the long walk to the swamp for water.”

What we can do:

New Well

Where we will be drilling is centrally located and will relieve many people of the long journey to fetch water and the challenge of accessing clean water.

Our team will drive over the LS200 mud rotary drill rig and set up camp for a couple of nights. Once the well is drilled to a sufficient water column, it will be cased, developed, and then tested. If these tests are positive, our mechanics will install a new India Mark II pump.

By drilling this borehole, Royeamp and the surrounding community will be provided with plenty of accessible, clean drinking water.

Training

There will be hygiene and sanitation training sessions offered for three days in a row.

Community members will learn how to make a hands-free handwashing station called the “tippy-tap.” We will use these tippy taps for handwashing demonstrations and will also teach about other tools like dish racks and the importance of properly penning in animals. We will highlight the need to keep restrooms clean, among many other topics.

This training will also strengthen a water user committee that will manage and maintain this new well. They will enforce proper behavior and report to us whenever they need our help in solving a serious problem, like a pump breakdown.

Project Updates


09/26/2022: Royeamp Community New Borehole Well Project Complete!

We are excited to share that there is now a safe, reliable borehole well at Royeamp Community. As a result, community members no longer rely on unsafe water to meet their daily needs. We also conducted hygiene and sanitation training, which focused on healthy practices such as handwashing and using latrines.

"I am glad for the provision of safe and pure drinking water that you have done in our village," said 12-year-old Kadiatu K. "We have been suffering for some time now for water. The distance from my house to the stream is too far. I hardly do many trips for the day because of the walking distance. There are times the water from the stream becomes dirty. This made it impossible for me to fetch water for cooking and drinking. Now that we have this new water point, I am so excited because all the water constraints I used to face would now become history."

Kadiatu at the well.

"I [will] have enough water to do all my work at home before going to school," Kadiatu continued. "I was suffering a lot to fetch water for domestic activities such as cooking, bathing, and drinking. But today, I am happy for the water point that [you all] have provided for us."

"All my lifetime, I relied on the swamp water as my main source of fetching water," said 33-year-old farmer Isatu Kamara. "The distance to the swamp was unbearable for me. This had prevented me from having enough water at home. This has affected me greatly around cooking, bathing, and laundering. That is why I am very happy [now that] the community finally has a new waterpoint. This will prevent all the unnecessary water constraints I used to experience."

Isatu drinks the well's water while community members celebrate.

"Today is one of my happy days for having safe and pure drinking water in this community," Isatu continued. "I want to give thanks to the almighty God for giving us the opportunity to drink safe and pure water. I believe that this water [will] help us to reduce the waterborne diseases that are affecting us in the community, and we will practice frequent handwashing to avoid bacteria transmission."

Isatu and Kadiatu celebrate at the well.

We held a dedication ceremony to officially hand over the well to the community members. A representative from Port Loko District Council also attended, which made the event more special.

Councilor Bangura pours water at the well.

District Councilor Abubakarr Bangura and the village headman gave short speeches thanking everyone who contributed to this water project and reminding everyone to take good care of it.

“I am so happy to get safe and pure drinking water today," said village headman Abu Kamara. "[For] over 40 years, we have been struggling for pure drinking water. But we now have safe and pure drinking water that is very much sustainable. On behalf of the Royeamp community people, I want to extend my gratitude for averting the water crisis in this community."

Then, Kadiatu and Isatu made statements on their community's behalf. The ceremony concluded with celebration, singing, and dancing.

New Well

The drill team arrived the day before beginning work. They set up camp and unpacked all their tools and supplies to prepare for drilling the next day. The community provided space for the team to store their belongings and meals for the duration of their stay. The following day, work began.

Our team dug two pits next to the drill rig, one for the drill’s water supply and another for what the drill pulls out of the borehole. In some cases, we order a private supplier to deliver the water for drilling since water access is already challenging.

Day one of drilling began as the team mixed water with bentonite, an absorbent clay, in the two dug pits. Next, the team fixed a four-inch carbide-tipped bit to the five-foot-long drill stem. They started the mud pump to supply water to the drill rig so that drilling could begin!

After putting each five-foot length of drill stem into the hole, the team took material samples. We labeled the bags to review them later and determine the aquifer locations.

On the second day of drilling, the team expanded the hole and cleared it of mud. After reaching a total depth of 23 meters, the team forcefully pumped clean water into the well to remove any dirt and debris from the drilling process. We then protected the screened pipe by adding a filter pack. The team hoisted the temporary drilling casing to fortify the pipes with cement.

Next, we bailed the well by hand for three days before conducting a yield test to verify the water quantity. This well has a static water level of 17 meters. With these excellent results, we installed a stainless steel pump. Water quality test results showed that this was clean water fit for drinking!

New Knowledge

Before conducting any hygiene training, we called and visited the local water user committee to understand the community’s challenges and lack of sanitation facilities. We shared the findings from our discussions with the committee members to help them make the necessary adjustments before the training began. For example, we identified households without handwashing stations or ones that may need to repair their latrines. With this information, community members worked together to improve hygiene and sanitation at home.

After this preparatory period, we scheduled a time when members from each household using the water point could attend a three-day hygiene and sanitation training. We then dispatched our teams to the agreed-upon location to hold the meeting.

Training topics covered included handwashing and tippy taps, good and bad hygiene habits, disease transmission and prevention, COVID-19, worms and parasites, proper dental hygiene, proper care of the well's pump, keeping the water clean, the cost recovery system, the importance of using dish racks and clotheslines, the importance of toilets, keeping latrines clean, balanced diets, the diarrhea doll, and HIV and AIDS.

One of the training participants demonstrates handwashing with a tippy-tap.

We had asked Royeamp's people to send one representative from each household to attend the three days of training. They granted our request and more - on each day of training, more and more people showed up, which demonstrates Royeamp's commitment to change.

One of the most-discussed topic was nutrition, which we demonstrate using a three-legged stool, with each leg representing a major food group. When any of the legs is removed, the stool falls. Several community members said that certain foods are forbidden in their households because of their traditional cultural beliefs. One woman said that no one in her family is allowed to eat meat, fish, or eggs because it is thought that those foods will lead a person to witchcraft.

A participant shows others the three-legged stool.

Another participant named Ramatu Kamara shared a personal story to combat this way of thinking. She said that her first pregnancy was very difficult and her baby was born malnourished, so the nurses at the health clinic where she gave birth told Ramatu to eat plenty of protein for her next pregnancy to prevent this occurrence. Ramatu reported that the nurses were right - when she ate meat, fish, and eggs during her second pregnancy, she felt better, and her baby was born healthier. The other participants applauded Ramatu for her story.

"This training was valuable to me, and it also gives me more new knowledge that will also create more impact [in] my life concerning health and sanitation activities," said Ramatu, when we asked her about her opinions on the training. "I was doing things which [had] a lot of repercussions for my health and the health and safety of my children. I say a big thank you for impacting my knowledge. Based on this knowledge, I would now be able to take care of myself and the environment by cleaning, making sure my drinking container is always clean and covered, and ensuring that I cover my food to prevent food contamination."

Conclusion

This project required a substantial collaboration between our staff, our in-country teams, and the community members themselves. When an issue arises concerning the well, community members are equipped with the necessary skills to rectify the problem and ensure the water point works appropriately. However, if the issue is beyond their capabilities, they can contact their local field officers to assist them.

Also, we will continue to offer them unmatchable support as a part of our monitoring and maintenance program. We walk with each community, problem-solving together when they face challenges with functionality, seasonality, or water quality. Together, all these components help us strive for enduring access to reliable, clean, and safe water for this community.

With your contribution, one more piece has been added to a large puzzle of water projects. In our target areas, we’re working toward complete coverage of reliable, maintained water sources within a 30-minute round trip for each community, household, school, and health center. With this in mind, search through our upcoming projects to see which community you can help next!

Thank you for making all of this possible!


The Water Project : sierraleone22617-0-clean-water-00002


08/08/2022: Royeamp Community New Well Underway!

A severe clean water shortage in Royeamp Community drains people’s time, energy, and health. Thanks to your generosity, we’re working to install a clean water point and much more.

Get to know this community through the introduction and pictures we’ve posted, and read about this water, sanitation, and hygiene project. We look forward to reaching out with more good news!


The Water Project : sierraleone22617-collecting-water


Project Photos


Project Type

Borehole and Hand Pump

Girls and women walk long distances for water when safe water is very often right under their feet! Underground rivers, called aquifers, often contain a constant supply of safe water – but you have to get to it. No matter what machine or piece of equipment is used, all drilling is aiming for a borehole that reaches into an aquifer. If the aquifer has water - and after the well is developed - we are able to pull water to the surface utilizing a hand-pump. If all goes as planned, the community is left with a safe, closed water source providing around 5 gallons of water a minute through a hand-pump.


Contributors

Project Sponsor - TGB Caring with Crypto