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The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Clean Water
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Clean Water
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Clean Water
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Clean Water
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Clean Water
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Clean Water
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Clean Water
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Flushing
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Flushing
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Flushing
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Drilling
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Drilling
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Drilling
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Drilling
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Drilling
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Drilling
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Drilling
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Training
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Oral Hygiene Training
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Training
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Handwashing Station Training
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Local Leaders In Attendance
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Training Raffle Winner
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Training
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Training
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Hygiene Puppet Show
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Training
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Surrounding Community
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Surrounding Community
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Surrounding Community
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Surrounding Community
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Surrounding Community
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Clinic Latrines
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Water In Clinic
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Inside The Clinic
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Inside The Clinic
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Clinic Staff
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Nurse Kamara
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Health Clinic
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Well We Will Drill Deeper
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Current Water Source
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Carrying Water
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Current Water Source
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Current Water Source
The Water Project: Kasongha Community, Maternal Child Health Post -  Clinic Sign

Project Status



Project Type:  Dug Well and Hand Pump

Regional Program: Port Loko, Sierra Leone WaSH Program

Impact: 500 Served

Project Phase:  Installed - Aug 2018

Functionality Status:  Functional

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



Community Profile

Kasonga is an urban center with a ton of concrete buildings on either side of busy streets. It’s noisy, particularly when the kids are out of school. The space between buildings doesn’t leave much space for cultivation, so there isn’t much green here.

The elders of Kasongha set aside land for a clinic to be built years before its establishment. In 2006, someone finally pushed for the funding of this clinic because of a steady increase in Kasongha’s population. In 2007, his efforts resulted in what’s seen here today. It employs three nurses who oversee four beds and an examination room.

Water

The clinic gets their water from a stream. The road to this water source is not long, but it becomes slippery and dangerous during the rainy months.

This water is used for everything from doing laundry to drinking. Even wild animals come and go, relying on this open water source. People and animals alike wade right in to the water for collection and drinking.

This wouldn’t be the case if the well at the health clinic had water all the time.

Staff there say it worked for years, but the extreme weather caused the water table to decrease. There are certain months people can be sure water will come from the pump, but they need a reliable clean water source that won’t only work when the weather is right. It is extremely important that these nurses have clean water to use in their treatment of patients.

Sanitation

“This is a health center and is expected to take the lead in cleanliness. If we compromise sanitation, how are we going to advise the patients about it?” Nurse Aminata Kamara said.

“I can say that our state of hygiene and sanitation is above expected level and I am very pleased with it.”

We can’t deny that the clinic is well-sanitized. There are hand-washing stations everywhere, along with soap. It’s the surrounding community that we’ll focus on training, for many lack latrines and other basic facilities they need to live a healthy life.

Here’s what we’re going to do about:

Training

There will be hygiene and sanitation training sessions offered to community members and clinic staff for three days in a row.

The hygiene and sanitation trainer decided it would be best to teach community members how to build a tippy tap (a hand-washing station built with a jerrycan, string, and sticks). They will use these tippy taps for hand-washing demonstrations, and will also teach about other tools like dish racks and the importance of properly penning in animals. Pictures will be used to teach the community how to discern between healthy and unhealthy hygiene and sanitation practices.

These trainings will also strengthen the water user committee that manages and maintains this well. They enforce proper behavior and report to us whenever they need our help solving a serious problem, like a pump breakdown.

Well Rehabilitation

Since extreme weather has affected this hand-dug at Maternal Child Health Post, we will be converting it to a borehole. Our drill team will be hand-drilling it much deeper! Once they’ve struck more than enough water, they’ll build a new well pad and install a stainless steel India MkII pump.

This clean water will not only supply the clinic and its patients during the day, but will be open for its neighboring community members during the night hours, too.


This project is a part of our shared program with Mariatu’s Hope. Our team is pleased to provide the reports for this project (formatted and edited for readability) thanks to the hard work of our friends in Sierra Leone.

Project Updates


08/08/2018: Maternal Child Health Post Project Complete

We are excited to share that there is now a safe, reliable water well at Maternal Child Health Post in Kasongha Community. Hygiene and sanitation training was also conducted, which focused on healthy practices such as washing hands and using latrines.

New Knowledge

We normally organize hygiene training sessions for individual communities. However, we were working on water wells in a number of adjacent villages, so we organized for a big group training at DEC Kasongha School. The turnout was huge with over 350 people!

The weather was very hot from the beginning. We rented military camping tents to provide us with some shade, but even that was not enough. Later in the day, the weather became so hot that even the team started to find shade for recovery. Despite the heat, training was successful.

We taught about handwashing and how to build a simple handwashing station called a tippy tap. We used illustrations to point out the differences between good and bad hygiene practices and to teach how germs are spread. We taught about the importance of having hygiene tools like clotheslines and dish racks.

We might have needed a larger mouth and toothbrush for everyone in this huge crowd to see!

A student health club we had trained presented a fun puppet show teaching about health topics. They used their animal puppets to talk about almost all of the hygiene training topics. But the part that stood out the most was when the instructors would display a photo and the puppets would explain what that photo depicts.

There were photos of varying good and bad hygiene practices such as a woman bathing her baby, a woman storing water in an uncovered container, another photo depicting somebody sweeping a compound, another photo depicting someone hanging clothes on drying lines. The puppets explained both the good and bad hygiene practices explicitly to the participants. But it was light-hearted as various jokes would trigger spontaneous outbursts of laughter.

We had comedians, actors in skits, and raffles to keep people engaged with the topic. Even the local leaders in attendance seemed interested in what we were teaching!

“Just look at what’s hanging on that stick. It is the tippy tap that we were taught about. Honestly, I didn’t know anything about tippy taps until that training,” Mrs. Isata Kamara said.

“And I have seen the benefit of it, especially when I see my kids washing their hands after play. I feel good within myself. This training will really help us a lot in this community.”

Learning how to make a tippy tap handwashing station

Even hygiene at the health clinic had been compromised because of the water shortage. Now, they and the surrounding community will have enough water to adhere to what they learned during training.

Clean Water Restored

The first thing the drill team did when they arrived Kasongha was to contact the local leaders. After getting permission to proceed, they set up camp by the well.

Here is how they restored clean, reliable water here:

1. Raise the tripod

2. Find the original depth (for this well, we measured 18.7 meters)

3. Socket the pipes

4. Install casing

5. Line up the drill rods

6. Drill!

Emptying red clay out of the drill bit

After 11 feet of drilling, the team encountered a large stone they couldn’t remove. It took about 30 minutes to drill through, after which they encountered red clay. The next layer was white clay. The team stopped at 27.15 meters, happy that they made it far below the aquifer.

7. Install screening and filter pack

8. Cement an iron rod to well lining, and fix it with an iron collar at the top

9. Bail the well by hand for three days

So. Much. Bailing! The well needs to be cleaned out after all that drilling.

10. Test the yield (we got a static water level of 17.3 meters going at 53.2 liters per minute)

11. Build a cement platform, walls, and drainage system

12. India Mk11 pump installation

13. Water quality test

Our field officers returned to Maternal Child Health Post at the news of finished construction. We met the caretaker of the well, who is the nurse in charge of the health center. Initially, there weren’t many people around for pictures. We had to wait for people to finish their prayers at the mosque. When the crowd grew, we really started to have fun with singing and dancing while children splashed in the water.

This is a very active Child Health Post with many deliveries. The rehabilitation of this well is making life so much easier for the women coming here to deliver babies. It has made things better for the nurses and the community members too!


The Water Project : 34-sierraleone18260-clean-water


04/25/2018: Maternal Child Health Post Project Underway

A severe clean water shortage at Maternal Child Health Post in Kasongha drains people’s time, energy, and health. Thanks to your generosity, we’re working to convert a hand-dug well into a borehole and more.

Get to know this clinic and the surrounding community through the introduction and pictures we’ve posted, and read about this water, sanitation and hygiene project. We look forward to reaching out with more good news!


The Water Project : 4-sierraleone18260-carrying-water


Project Photos


Project Type

Dug Well and Hand Pump

Hand-dug wells are best suited for clay, sand, gravel and mixed soil ground formations. A large diameter well is dug by hand, and then lined with either bricks or concrete to prevent contamination and collapse of the well. Once a water table is hit, the well is capped and a hand-pump is installed – creating a complete and enclosed water system.



Contributors

1 individual donor(s)