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The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Fudia Bangura
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Clean Water
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Clean Water
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Clean Water
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Clean Water
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Clean Water
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Clean Water
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Clean Water
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Clean Water
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Clean Water
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Successful Installation
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Bricking The Well
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Flushing
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Flushing
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Drilling
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Drilling
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Drilling
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Drilling
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Drilling
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Drilling
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Pa Ibrahim Sorie Mansaray
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Handwashing Training
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Handwashing Training
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Building Tippy Taps
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Oral Hygiene Training
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Oral Hygiene Training
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Bed Net Training
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Training
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Training
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Training
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Training
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Training
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Training
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Training
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Water User Committee Meeting
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Water User Committee Meeting
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Using A Clothesline
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Inside A Latrine
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Latrine
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Komrabai Jawarah
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Alternative Water Source
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Alternative Water Source
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Alternative Water Source
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Alternative Water Source
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Alternative Water Source
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Alternative Water Source
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Well We Will Drill At The Mosque
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Masjeed Arahaman
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Community Activities
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Community Activities
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Community Activities
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Community Activities
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Community Activities
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Community Activities
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Community Activities
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Community Activities
The Water Project: Kitonki Community A -  Community Household

Project Status



Project Type:  Dug Well and Hand Pump

Regional Program: Port Loko, Sierra Leone WaSH Program

Impact: 456 Served

Project Phase:  Installed - Aug 2018

Functionality Status:  Functional

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



Community Profile

Kintoki is a very rural village which is yet to experience the recent urbanization that is going on in some other communities. Vegetation sprawls untouched. It is perfectly quiet throughout the day as villagers spend time working on their farms. Most of the buildings here are made of locally produced mud blocks with cement plastering and are arranged in straight rows on opposites sides of the major roads.

All the people in Kintoki Village are very unified because they have one Muslim faith. There is a mosque in the center of the village that serves many purposes and all village activities take place here.

The idea of building a mosque originated with Pa Jawara in 1990. According to him, he thought of it overnight and brought it to the notice of other community elders in the morning. This idea was well-received by the entire community, and he immediately donated a plot of land where the mosque should be built.

They had no capital to construct even a brick structure at that time, so they constructed a small “bafa” from local materials. The congregation at that time was only nine people, comprising of the community elders. This mosque has since been rebuilt and renamed Masjid Arahaman. At least 80 community members visit this mosque regularly for prayers and teachings.

Water Situation

The mosque has a hand-dug well, but it went dry. The community has since abandoned the well.

So, all of the people in this part of Kitonki go to the swamp for their water since they have no other source. The swamp is more than one kilometer away, making it particularly hard for young children and the elderly to get the water they need. Here’s they’ve dug a hole with a hatch, where a bucket and rope can be lowered for water.

The water levels get very low during the dry months, so community members have to dig other holes to find more water. They share this swamp area with wild animals, which is one of the many reasons this source is so dangerous.

People in this part of Kintoki Village filter their water so that they can reduce the floating particles. Without filtering, the water would be a milky color and would contain some clay and leaves.

But it’s not the poor quality of water people complain most about, it’s the fact they have to walk such a long distance back and forth. Limited trips do not provide the water needed to run a household properly. Children are in pain after carrying buckets of water over long distances and are tired after getting up so early before school to do so.

Beyond the distance, both young and old suffer from cholera, typhoid, and dysentery.

Sanitation Situation

Most of the compounds here are fenced in with their latrine facilities at the far end. Every household in this area has a latrine, and people keep their latrines clean. The floors were dry and a fifth of them had a little handwashing kettle in the corner. However, most pits were left open to flies coming and going. The mosque itself has no latrines, so people must return home if need be.

“Based on what you have said about hygiene so far, I can say that the factor that frustrates our hygiene effort is no availability of enough water. But we do clean our compounds, as you can see, and maintain our latrines to some extent,” Pa Komrabai Jawara said.

“Just that for cleanliness to be complete, one needs plenty of water and that is actually what we lack in this community. So for now, our status is a little bad but if you people help us with this water well we shall try to improve on it.”

What we can do:

Training

There will be hygiene and sanitation training sessions offered for three days in a row.

The hygiene and sanitation trainer decided it would be best to teach community members the importance of handwashing, building and using dish racks, and other sanitation facilities. Pictures will be used to teach the community how to discern between healthy and unhealthy hygiene and sanitation practices. They will applaud the community for full latrine coverage but will also teach them how to improve by keeping flies out of the pits.

These trainings will also result in a water user committee that manages and maintains the new well. They will enforce proper behavior and report to us whenever they need our help solving a serious problem, like a pump breakdown.

Well Rehabilitation

We want to work on the well located at the mosque (the one with an old pump pictured on this report). Our team has decided to do the hard work of drilling a borehole by hand in the bottom of this well, which will not only increase the water quantity but will ensure its quality, too. A new well pad will keep contaminants out, and a new India MkII stainless steel pump will provide easy and safe access to the clean water inside.

This community has been drinking dirty swamp water and suffering the consequences. With our rehabilitating this open well, Kitonki Community will be provided with plenty of safe, clean drinking water.


This project is a part of our shared program with Mariatu’s Hope. Our team is pleased to provide the reports for this project (edited for clarity) thanks to the hard work of our friends in Sierra Leone.

Project Updates


08/22/2018: Kitonki Community Project Complete

We are excited to share that there is a safe, reliable water point in Kitonki Community, already providing clean water to families! People here no longer have to rely on dirty water from the swamp. Hygiene and sanitation training was also conducted, which focused on healthy practices such as washing hands and using latrines.

New Knowledge

The team sent a member to inform this community about a proposed hygiene training session. Later, reminder calls were made to the chairman of the water committee. On the morning of the training, another call was made to the same man so that he would get the community settled at the venue before the team arrived. Training was held by the mosque and the water user committee chairman’s home. Attendance was great, and when the participants left to go home, they would come back with more people the next day. A good word was spreading about how interesting training was!

Training topics included handwashing and how to make a tippy tap handwashing station, good and bad hygiene, disease transmission, tools like dish racks and clotheslines, oral rehydration solution, animal care, latrine use, and pump maintenance.

A woman practicing handwashing using the tippy tap she just made.

Oral hygiene was an interesting topic. People are losing their teeth over time because of improper care, especially in the rural areas. This topic was designed to help rural people take proper care of the teeth. The trainer first lectured on the chemicals that should be used to clean the teeth. Some of the cheap toothpaste sold in the area wear away gums. When he took out the big mouth and toothbrush for demonstrations, everyone had a good laugh. He encouraged people to brush their teeth at least twice a day and change their toothbrush every three months. He also advised them not to leave their toothbrushes with everything else in their toilet bags.

“It is no shame to tell you that most of what we have learned about good health is very new to us. We never knew about what you guys call tippy taps and we pay very little attention to handwashing. But we have been told its importance and that handwashing alone can avert a lot of sicknesses in our community. Even our treatment of our drinking water use to be very poor. We now know that placing water on the floor is unsafe,” said Mr. Ibrahim Mansaray.

“Our lives will be largely safe by applying what you guys have taught us.”

Clean Water Restored

The first thing the drill team did when they arrived in Kitonki Community was to contact local leadership, and then find a place to camp. The village elders found a free room for the team to store their equipment in.

Here is how they restored clean, reliable water here:

1. Raised the tripod

2. Found the original depth (for this well, we measured 55 feet)

3. Socketed the pipes

4. Installed casing

5. Lined up the drill rods

6. Drilled!

Drilling by hand is always hard labor. Each bit of drilling progress needs to be backed up with temporary casing to keep the hole open. The team first hit sand at 32 feet. There was sandy clay for four more feet, at which point the team was confident that with the additional 36 feet, this well would serve the community through the driest months. Now, this well has a total depth of 91 feet.

7. Installed screening and filter pack

8. Cemented an iron rod to well lining, and fixed it with an iron collar at the top

9. Bailed the well by hand for three days

10. Tested the yield (we got a static water level of 68.6 feet going at 53 liters per minute)

11. Built a cement platform, walls, and drainage system

12. Installed a stainless steel India Mk11 pump

The hand-drill method allows the team to install the cylinder far below the aquifer so that the community has great water access throughout the year.

13. Water quality test

The Ministry of Water Resources has verified that this well meets the World Health Organization’s standards for drinking water.

A successful pump installation!

The handing over ceremony was very special here. When we arrived to celebrate, we were welcomed the by melodious voices of traditional singers from a neighboring village’s dance troupe. Community members were singing and dancing to their own music, too.

A simple drama portraying proper pump care was performed, which was hugely applauded by everybody. That was our closing activity, but without notifying us, the community had prepared enough food for the team to eat a meal. Everyone ate and drank, and there was even more dancing and singing after.

“This well has brought sanity here,” said Mrs. Fudia Bangura.

“Before now, we were under plenty of strain to bathe and put water in our buckets. We were always concerned with the approach of the rainy season. Cholera and diarrhea threatened us due to bad drinking water. Anyways, it is now our duty to comply with the education we have gotten from you guys. You have done very well for us in this community and God willing, we will not disappoint you either.”


The Water Project : 32-sierraleone18266-clean-water


06/06/2018: Kitonki Community Project Underway

Dirty water from open sources is making people in Kitonki Community sick. Thanks to your generosity, we’re working to install a clean water point and much more.

Get to know your community through the narrative and pictures we’ve posted, and read about this water, sanitation and hygiene project. We look forward to reaching out with more good news!


The Water Project : 14-sierraleone18266-alternative-water-source


Project Photos


Project Type

Dug Well and Hand Pump

Hand-dug wells are best suited for clay, sand, gravel and mixed soil ground formations. A large diameter well is dug by hand, and then lined with either bricks or concrete to prevent contamination and collapse of the well. Once a water table is hit, the well is capped and a hand-pump is installed – creating a complete and enclosed water system.



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