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The Water Project: Kamasando DEC Primary School -  Water Flowing
The Water Project: Kamasando DEC Primary School -  Playing At The New Well
The Water Project: Kamasando DEC Primary School -  Splash
The Water Project: Kamasando DEC Primary School -  Smiles For Reliable Water
The Water Project: Kamasando DEC Primary School -  Celebrating The Well
The Water Project: Kamasando DEC Primary School -  Students Gathered At Dedication Ceremony
The Water Project: Kamasando DEC Primary School -  Flushing The Well
The Water Project: Kamasando DEC Primary School -  Installing Permanent Casing
The Water Project: Kamasando DEC Primary School -  Hand Drilling
The Water Project: Kamasando DEC Primary School -  Preparing Temporary Casing
The Water Project: Kamasando DEC Primary School -  Setting Up Drill Rig
The Water Project: Kamasando DEC Primary School -  Tippy Tap In Use For Handwashing
The Water Project: Kamasando DEC Primary School -  Participants Show New Tippy Taps
The Water Project: Kamasando DEC Primary School -  Building Tippy Taps For Handwashing At Home
The Water Project: Kamasando DEC Primary School -  Learning About Tippy Taps For Handwashing
The Water Project: Kamasando DEC Primary School -  Tooth Brushing Demonstration
The Water Project: Kamasando DEC Primary School -  Fun At The Training
The Water Project: Kamasando DEC Primary School -  Glitter For Handwashing And Germ Demonstration
The Water Project: Kamasando DEC Primary School -  Students Participate In Training
The Water Project: Kamasando DEC Primary School -  Students Listening To Instruction On Hygiene And Sanitation
The Water Project: Kamasando DEC Primary School -  Facilitator Speaks To The Students
The Water Project: Kamasando DEC Primary School -  Community Latrine
The Water Project: Kamasando DEC Primary School -  Clothesline
The Water Project: Kamasando DEC Primary School -  Bathshelter
The Water Project: Kamasando DEC Primary School -  Zainab Kamara
The Water Project: Kamasando DEC Primary School -  Well To Be Rehabed
The Water Project: Kamasando DEC Primary School -  Well In Need Of Rehab
The Water Project: Kamasando DEC Primary School -  Water Containers
The Water Project: Kamasando DEC Primary School -  Students Pose
The Water Project: Kamasando DEC Primary School -  Students In Class
The Water Project: Kamasando DEC Primary School -  School Sign
The Water Project: Kamasando DEC Primary School -  School Libeary
The Water Project: Kamasando DEC Primary School -  School Latrine
The Water Project: Kamasando DEC Primary School -  School Compound
The Water Project: Kamasando DEC Primary School -  School Canteen
The Water Project: Kamasando DEC Primary School -  Preparing To Carry Water Home
The Water Project: Kamasando DEC Primary School -  Martin Koroma
The Water Project: Kamasando DEC Primary School -  Learning
The Water Project: Kamasando DEC Primary School -  Kitchen
The Water Project: Kamasando DEC Primary School -  Household
The Water Project: Kamasando DEC Primary School -  Handwashing Station
The Water Project: Kamasando DEC Primary School -  Dish Drying Rack
The Water Project: Kamasando DEC Primary School -  Community Latrine

Project Status



Project Type:  Dug Well and Hand Pump

Regional Program: Port Loko, Sierra Leone WaSH Program

Impact: 500 Served

Project Phase:  In Service - Jan 2019

Functionality Status:  Functional

Last Checkup: 08/06/2019

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



When Kamasando DEC Primary School experiences water shortage, they are compelled to take their kids out in search of water because they cannot afford to go without some. There is a well on the school grounds, but it does not work all year long.

People have to queue for long hours waiting for their individual turn to collect water due to the low discharge rate throughout the year. This causes overcrowding. Some groups of people, such as school pupils and employees in the early shifts, have to give up waiting and go to their schools and workplaces.

Both the teachers and the kids miss valuable lesson time in the classes due to the problem. This results in the loss of study time and poor performance on the part of pupils in the public exams.

This well gets chlorinated quarterly and there are good controls via the water user committee on the ground. They have a pipe extension that allows people to fill their containers from the outside of the wall. That means only one person is inside of the well area at a time.

The latrines at the school are in a very good condition. The environment is enviable with all the rooms clean and floor dry. All the holes were covered with no flies and mosquitoes around. There were hand washing stations in all the rooms and all had water in them –  all positive signs that the school is prepared for taking care of its well and further improving their hygiene and sanitation status.

“I was actually very impressed with this school’s sanitation in their latrine,” our field officer said.

This community has undergone some urbanization as a result of migration. This means that most of its trees have been cut down to make way for new homes, and as a result, the community has lost most of its vegetation. The buildings are of varying types, but most are built of locally produced mud blocks, some with cement plastering and arranged in straight lines on opposite sides of the roads in the community.

This community can be peaceful and or noisy depending on the time of the day. When the kids are away in their various schools and other community members went to their various points of livelihood seeking, living behind their inactive relatives, the place would be peaceful and vice-versa.

What we will do:

Training

There will be hygiene and sanitation training sessions offered for three days in a row. We will teach about good and bad hygiene, penning in animals, and building good tools like handwashing stations and dish racks. Most importantly, the trainer will emphasize the importance of having and using even basic pit latrines.

Well Rehabilitation

We see that there’s been a drop in this area’s water table and the well is going dry. We feel it is important to convert this hand-dug well to a borehole at the bottom, thus giving this community a year-round source of safe drinking water.

We will be hand-drilling a borehole down inside this hand-dug well. The community will host our drill team for days at a time, and may also provide labor. Women will volunteer to cook rice for the team and the other community volunteers.

Once this plan is implemented, this community will have access to safe drinking water in both quality and quantity, even through the dry months.

Project Updates


01/30/2019: DEC Primary & Junior Secondary School Project Complete

We are excited to share that there is a safe, reliable water point at DEC Primary & Junior Secondary School that’s been restored to provide clean water! Students and neighboring community members no longer have to rely on dirty water from the swamp. Hygiene and sanitation training was also conducted, which focused on healthy practices such as washing hands and using latrines.

Clean Water Restored

The first thing the drill team did when they arrived at DEC Primary & Junior Secondary School was to contact local leadership and find a place to camp. They found a good spot for their tents at a shady edge of the school grounds.

Here is how they restored clean, reliable water here:

1. Raised the tripod

2. Found the original depth (for this well, we measured 64 feet)

3. Socketed the pipes

4. Installed casing

5. Lined up the drill rods

6. Drilled!

The team fixed the sand bit, a specialized sand drilling equipment and started at 67 feet with sand been the very first layer. This layer was drilled for about 6 feet increasing the total depth to 73 feet. The next layer was clay and the team changed the bit from sand to clay bit another specialized equipment. This also was drilled for another 5 feet, another increment of depth to 78 feet was reached. The team negotiated a sand layer again and subsequently changed the bit again to the sand bit. Another 6 feet was added, totaling 84 feet.

7. Installed screening and filter pack

8. Cemented an iron rod to well lining, and fixed it with an iron collar at the top

9. Bailed the well by hand for three days

10. Tested the yield (we got a static water level of 60 feet going at 41 liters per minute)

11. Built a cement platform, walls, and drainage system

12. The team reinstalled the India MkII stainless steel pump because all the internal parts were replaced recently – the entire pump was working just like new.

The hand-drill method allows the team to install the cylinder far below the aquifer so that the community has great water access throughout the year.

13. Water quality test

The Ministry of Water Resources has verified that this well meets the World Health Organization’s standards for drinking water.

Upon news of safe water, our team arranged for a celebration with the school. The dedication started with the team and the kids loudly singing praise and worship songs. Some market women, those who sell at the school’s canteen also joined in with very loud clapping and dancing and very happy smiles all over their faces. This was allowed to continue for some time and in the process, some other community people of all groups joined in.

The singing and dancing were gently quieted and some kids were selected to enter the tap area. Classes one and two pupils were given the instructions to do whatever they wish with the water as they would in their normal water fetching scenarios. So two kids started to fetch water while the other was now in full swing playing with water. They so enjoyed the fun, and their body language suggested that they were not ready for an end to it. The next batch was the classes five and six pupils. And they two went through this same routine.

More formal speeches followed to mark the occasion and celebrate the well.

“My brother this well is a blessing to this school. Our finance, hygiene, and health situations have now been upgraded,” said teacher Foday T. Kamara to the people gathered.

New Knowledge

The team sent a member to inform the school and its parents about a proposed hygiene training session. Later, reminder calls were made to the chairman of the water committee. On the morning of the training, another reminder call was made. We were thrilled to find all of the students and many of their parents, totaling more than 200 people, awaiting us.

This school’s classrooms were not big enough to accommodate all participants. So all the pupils and the few community people were taken outside under the only mango tree in the compound. The team planned the training so well that it avoided any interference with the school’s busy schedules. This and the condition under which the training was held were the major contributors to the high level of involvement and participation.

Training topics included handwashing and how to make a tippy tap handwashing station, good and bad hygiene, disease transmission, tools like dish racks and clotheslines, oral rehydration solution, animal care, latrine use, and pump maintenance.

We love using demonstrations and illustrations to teach these things and more.

The kids and the people would volunteer for anything and they asked questions whenever they become doubtful of any message. The topic that attracted the most questions from participants was the three-legged stool demonstration. This topic illustrates the importance of a balanced diet. Like a stool’s legs, it must be evenly balanced to work properly. It means that traditional food like cassava leaves and palm oil alone are not good enough for a person’s health. The interaction was quite appreciated by the team and it was a sure sign that the participants were comprehending and appreciating the training.

The tippy taps was another area of interest. We taught attendees how to make handwashing stations using household items and about the importance of washing one’s hands after using the bathroom, before and after eating, and at other key times.

“The training has taught us a very economical way of using water in the form of the tippy tap. This is a new idea to all of us in this community and even the school,” said Mohamed R. Kamara.

“Most of us were brought up in a very traditional way with little regard to hygiene practices like regular hand washing. This training has informed us about the importance of it and how it will help us wash away diseases in our locality.”


The Water Project : sierraleone18305-water-flowing


11/05/2018: Kamasando DEC Primary School Project Underway

A severe clean water shortage at Kamasando DEC Primary School drains students’ time, energy, and health. Thanks to your generosity, we’re working to establish a clean, reliable water point and much more.

Get to know your school through the introduction and pictures we’ve posted, and read about this water, sanitation and hygiene project. We look forward to reaching out with more good news!


The Water Project : sierraleone18305-students-pose


Project Photos


Project Type

Dug Well and Hand Pump

Hand-dug wells are best suited for clay, sand, gravel and mixed soil ground formations. A large diameter well is dug by hand, and then lined with either bricks or concrete to prevent contamination and collapse of the well. Once a water table is hit, the well is capped and a hand-pump is installed – creating a complete and enclosed water system.


Contributors

Project Sponsor - Pineapple Fund