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The Water Project: Lokomasama, Menika, DEC Menika Primary School -  Fishing Net
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Menika, DEC Menika Primary School -  Household
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Menika, DEC Menika Primary School -  Household
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Menika, DEC Menika Primary School -  Kitchen
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Menika, DEC Menika Primary School -  Main Water Source
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Menika, DEC Menika Primary School -  Mashing Rice
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Menika, DEC Menika Primary School -  Mrs Hannah Kanu Head Teacher
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Menika, DEC Menika Primary School -  Pa Kolleh Kamara
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Menika, DEC Menika Primary School -  School Building
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Menika, DEC Menika Primary School -  School Field
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Menika, DEC Menika Primary School -  School Latrine
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Menika, DEC Menika Primary School -  School Materials
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Menika, DEC Menika Primary School -  School Sign
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Menika, DEC Menika Primary School -  Students Fetching Water
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Menika, DEC Menika Primary School -  Students Inside Class Room
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Menika, DEC Menika Primary School -  Washing Dishes
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Menika, DEC Menika Primary School -  Students Playing
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Menika, DEC Menika Primary School -  Students Carrying Water
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Menika, DEC Menika Primary School -  Students Walking To Fetch Water

Project Status



Project Type:  Borehole Well and Hand Pump

Regional Program: Port Loko, Sierra Leone WaSH Program

Project Phase:  Donate to this Project
Estimated Install Date (?):  12/31/2019

Project Features


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Community Profile

DEC Menika Primary School is situated in a rural area at the entrance of the village. It is surrounded by trees of various varieties and a large open field. The school is far away from the village with the only neighbor being the local clinic and the homes of the primary health provider and caretaker of the school.

In the wake of Sierra Leone’s civil war, this rural community decided they needed a school. The people saw the benefits of education when certain provisions made to communities that were affected by the war were withheld because there were no educated individuals to represent the village.

It started with 76 pupils, two teachers, and a headmaster. The first headmaster was Alhaji Kamara, who was responsible for the fast transformation of the school to its present location. Within one school year, the community came together and constructed the present school. He stayed on until 2018. Today, some 332 students attend the school.

In contrast, the school’s experience with water has been a challenge. A hand-dug well was attempted more than a decade ago and never finished. Another attempt in 2008 to finish the project also failed. There is a public health clinic adjacent to the school with a working well, but it is meant only for patients. As a result, students must get water from the community well located about a 5-minute walk away from the school.

The water is accessible throughout the day and night but with the large crowds, some students either return to school late or decide to head to the swamp instead. This means either time is lost waiting to get water or the students are exposed to a contaminated source – which causes some to fall ill and miss school.

“Our children have to come to the village to fetch water for the school and they use that as an excuse to skip school. The number of absences are plenty and we want to reduce that by making sure everything they need is at the school,” Pa Koleh Kamara told us.

Here’s what we’re going to do about it:

Well Rehabilitation

The well marked for this overhaul was never finished. It needs major work to supply adequate, clean water to the community year round. A hand auger will be lowered inside and powered by a drill team. This hand auger will allow the team to drill several meters deeper to hit a sufficient water column that will ensure the well supplies water throughout all seasons.

As the team drills, casing will be installed, transforming the bottom of this hand-dug well into a borehole. PVC piping will connect this lower system directly to the pump, a construction that we know will also improve the quality of water.

Once this plan is implemented, everyone within the community will have access to safe drinking water in both quality and quantity, even through the dry months.

Hygiene and Sanitation Training

There will be hygiene and sanitation training sessions offered for three days in a row.

No handwashing stations were observed here. After our visit, the hygiene and sanitation trainer decided it would be best to teach community members how to build a tippy tap (a hand-washing station built with a jerrycan, string, and sticks). They will use these tippy taps for handwashing demonstrations, and will also teach about other tools like dish racks and the importance of properly penning in animals.

These trainings will also strengthen the water user committee that manages and maintains this well. They enforce proper behavior and report to us whenever they need our help solving a serious problem, like a pump breakdown.

We're just getting started, check back soon!


Project Photos


Project Type

Borehole and Hand Pump

Girls and women walk long distances for water when safe water is very often right under their feet! Underground rivers, called aquifers, often contain a constant supply of safe water – but you have to get to it. No matter what machine or piece of equipment is used, all drilling is aiming for a borehole that reaches into an aquifer. If the aquifer has water - and after the well is developed - we are able to pull water to the surface utilizing a hand-pump. If all goes as planned, the community is left with a safe, closed water source providing around 5 gallons of water a minute through a hand-pump.


Contributors