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The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Child Happy For Clean Water
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Drinking Well Water
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Fatu Turay
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Old Woman Happy Drinking Safe Drinking Water
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Kids Drinking Weater From The Well
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Playing At The Well
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Betty Walker Giving Vote Of Thanks
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Richmond Samuel Ndowu
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Clean Water Flowing
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Thank You
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Thank You
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Thank You
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Thank You
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Woman Celebrating The Well
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Woman Rejoicing For Safe Drinking Water
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Disease Transmission Activity
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Handwashing Demonstration
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  James Columba
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Participants
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  People Listening
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Tippy Tap Lessons
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Trainer Goes Over Toothbrushing
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Training
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Chlorination
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Bailing
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Drilling
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Drilling
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Drilling
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Drilling
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Drilling
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Pad Construction
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Pad Construction
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Pad Construction
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Yield Test
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Yield Test
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Diarrhea Doll Demonstration
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Broken Well
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Builder Constructs New Window
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Clothes Hanging To Dry
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Clothesline
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Cooking In The Kitchen
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Dish Drying Rack
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Dish Rack
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Fetching Water At Open Source
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Improvised Bathing Shelter
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Kitchen Building
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Latrine With Makeshift Sides
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  People At Home
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Phillip K Conteh
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Trash Pit
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Washing Clothes At The Local River
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Water Storage In The House
The Water Project: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane -  Boys Lift Water To Carry Home

Project Status



Project Type:  Borehole Well and Hand Pump

Regional Program: Port Loko, Sierra Leone WaSH Program

Impact: 429 Served

Project Phase:  In Service - Oct 2019

Functionality Status:  Functional

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



The well that the more than 400 people here use for water stops working during the dry season. The water table in this part on the country is far below depths that private contractors can reach. So, most of their products run dry in the dry season.

There is another borehole in this community but it is virtually useless. The community said this well was only functioning for one month and then stopped. It broke down because it has a cheaply made pump on it. It basically doesn’t work and the person who drilled the well didn’t drill it to a good depth, so it has been rendered useless by the community.

A third private well in the community is still under construction after more than three years since the project started. It doesn’t even produce water. Packaged water is an option, but the source of the water is unclear and it is often too costly for people to afford.

As a result, people turn to the nearby swamp to meet their water needs at various points during the year.

“Having clean water in the system is good for everyone’s health,” said Emilia Johnson to us during a visit to the well.

“If I want to drink water and the well is dry, I may be tempted to fill the gap with dirty water from the swamp. That is where cholera and diarrhea quietly creep in.”

It is gross to think of drinking water from the swamp. This swamp is not protected and is exposed to all sorts of contaminants.

It is in the open and therefore prone to pollution. To start with, the heaviest contaminant is human activity. Humans use this source to bathe and to launder. During these activities, the contaminated wastewater drains back into the source.

In addition, farmers will fill their watering cans without care for their condition. And then there is the fact that kids openly defecate in it. Whenever it rains, all dirt in the community ends up in the water, bringing more contaminants to it.

All of these activities and occurrences destroy this source’s water quality. Therefore, the water from this source is not good for drinking.

The good news is that we have the ability to reach much lower depths so that wells will consistently provide water – even through the dry season. So we are going to do that for the well that is most-used by people here.

Suctarr Community hosts some of the government’s important institutions like the quarters for government workers, the government hospital, and a whole military garrison. So, it has some urban features. But Khalil Lane is on the outskirts with lots of vegetation. This part of Suctarr is mostly peaceful, especially when the kids go to school. The buildings located on the main road are mostly concrete.

Livelihoods here are supported by various activities. People farm, trade, engage in vocational trades, and a few people are employed teachers, some are also airport workers and hospital staff  However, most people make a living as petty traders or farmers.

Here’s what we’re going to do about it:

Hygiene and Sanitation Training

There will be hygiene and sanitation training sessions offered for three days in a row.

No handwashing stations were observed here. After our visit, the hygiene and sanitation trainer decided it would be best to teach community members how to build a tippy tap (a handwashing station built with a jerrycan, string, and sticks). They will use these tippy taps for handwashing demonstrations, and will also teach about other tools like dish racks and the importance of properly penning in animals.

These trainings will also strengthen the water user committee that manages and maintains this well. They enforce proper behavior and report to us whenever they need our help solving a serious problem, like a pump breakdown.

Well Rehabilitation

The well marked for this overhaul is dry for four months every year and needs major work to supply adequate, clean water to the community year round. The pump will be removed, and a hand auger will be lowered inside and powered by a drill team. This hand auger will allow the team to drill several meters deeper to hit a sufficient water column that will ensure the well supplies water throughout all seasons.

As the team drills, casing will be installed, transforming the bottom of this hand-dug well into a borehole. PVC piping will connect this lower system directly to the pump, a construction that we know will also improve the quality of water.

Once this plan is implemented, everyone within the community will have access to safe drinking water in both quality and quantity, even through the dry months.

Project Updates


10/31/2019: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane Project Complete!

We are excited to share that there is a safe, reliable water point at 10 Khalil Lane in Sierra Leone that is already providing clean water to students and neighboring community members! We also conducted hygiene and sanitation training, which focused on healthy practices such as handwashing and using latrines.

Clean Water Restored

The team left the office for this community in the morning. Upon arrival, they met and made formal introductions mainly to the community elders and the water-user committee. They were happily received and immediately accommodated at a room and a parlor house close to the well. One woman by the name of Marion was introduced to the team for doing their house-keeping.

The team immediately split up after offloading the delivery vehicle. One group handled the putting together of the tripod and the other group packed their materials and luggage in the house.

Here is how we restored clean, reliable water here:

– Raised the tripod

– Found the original depth (for this well, we measured 15.5 meters)

– Socketed the pipes

– Installed casing

– Lined up the drill rods

– Drilled!

A slight delay was experienced due to the installed PVCs sucking sand and the air compressor failing to develop the well. There was another round of drilling to compensate for the depth lost to the sucked sand.

We reached a final depth of 21.3 meters with the water at 10.7 meters. The hand-drill method allowed the team to install the cylinder far below the aquifer so that the community has great water access throughout the year. The team proceeded as follows:

– Installed screening and filter pack

– Cemented an iron rod to the well lining, and fixed it with an iron collar at the top

– Bailed the well by hand for 3 days and flushed it

– Tested the yield

– Built a cement platform, walls, and drainage system

– Installed a stainless steel India Mk11 pump

– Conducted a water quality test

We then formally dedicated the well and handed it over to the community. The dedication started with marching and dancing around the well, singing and praising for this laudable opportunity which they considered as a blessing. Then, people entered the fence of the well and started playing with the water. The children shouted with joy and appreciation for their safe drinking water.

They believed that this project has saved them from the burden of long-distance walk-in search of water, which used to be a major cause of illness for young people.

A child name Betty Walker and an elderly woman named Madam Fatu Turay expressed their thanks and appreciation for this water well rehabilitation. Richmond N’dowu, a member of the water committee, also made a statement of gratitude for this project.

“We have long suffered for pure drinking water. My children actually walked for almost a mile before getting water,” said Richmond.

“The presence of this well has confined our troubles to history and we are very thankful to this organization and its partners.”

New Knowledge

Before any hygiene training, repeated phone calls and visits were made to the committee to help them understand the challenges and lack of sanitation facilities in the community. The findings from our baseline survey were brought to the attention of the water user committee to help them make the necessary adjustments before the training or drilling could commence. When all the necessary and required guidelines were met, then and only then did our team of hygiene trainers go to conduct the training.

When the message reached Philip Conteh, our main contact person for the community, that the team had scheduled a date for the training, he shared it with committee members. Each member was charged with the responsibility of informing the households around their area. This way most people in the community knew about the event. Volunteers were organized to be at the venue before the team arrived for training every day. Their mandate was to prepare the venue in terms of sweeping and arrangement of seats. The team was encouraged by that.

The dry season is expected to be hot. The weather defied this expectation for the 3 days of training. It was sunny but not hot because the community is surrounded by mango trees. The meeting was held under mango trees and seating positions were arranged with consideration for people’s heights so that shorter ones sat in front and those who were taller occupied the back seats. The place was naturally well ventilated and ideal for the teaching and learning process.

The training manual is rich with demonstrative lessons and this is perfect for participants’ total involvement. All lessons were taught with the volunteers from the group. They helped to demonstrate the preparation of tippy taps, disease transmission stories, and handwashing, among other topics.

Training topics covered included handwashing and tippy tap; good and bad hygiene; disease transmission and prevention; worms and parasites; proper care of teeth; proper care of the pump; keeping the water clean; the cost recovery system; dishracks and clotheslines; the importance of toilets; keeping the latrine clean; balanced diets; diarrhea symptoms and treatment; and HIV and AIDS.

The instructors also allowed considerable time for questions and answers. Everyone at the venue wanted to be heard. Humor is a normal thing during hygiene and sanitation training and here was no exception.

“The workshop has had a great impact on my life, especially in the area of water cleanliness. One thing that I actually appreciate learning about is the dangers posed by human hair to our drinking water,” said James Columba, after the 3 days of training.

“I also liked the lessons on disease transmission very much. In general, this training was very educative. I want to personally thank your organization for arranging this training”.

Thank you for making all of this possible!


The Water Project : sierraleone19277-clean-water-flowing


08/01/2019: Lungi, Suctarr, 10 Khalil Lane Project Underway!

A severe clean water shortage at 10 Khalil Lane drains community members’ time, energy, and health. Thanks to your generosity, we’re working to install a clean water point and much more.

Get to know your school through the introduction and pictures we’ve posted, and read about this water, sanitation and hygiene project. We look forward to reaching out with more good news!


The Water Project : sierraleone19265-fetching-water-at-open-source


Project Photos


Project Type

Borehole and Hand Pump

Girls and women walk long distances for water when safe water is very often right under their feet! Underground rivers, called aquifers, often contain a constant supply of safe water – but you have to get to it. No matter what machine or piece of equipment is used, all drilling is aiming for a borehole that reaches into an aquifer. If the aquifer has water - and after the well is developed - we are able to pull water to the surface utilizing a hand-pump. If all goes as planned, the community is left with a safe, closed water source providing around 5 gallons of water a minute through a hand-pump.


Contributors

Project Sponsor - Yakima Foursquare Church
1 individual donor(s)