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The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Small Girl Drinks From The Well
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Community Elder Splashing Water
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Community Members Celebrate
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Kids Splashing Water
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Small Boy Making Statement
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Small Boy Dumps Water On Himself
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Splashing Water With Banner
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Ward Councilor Joyfully Splashing At The Well
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Woman Celebrates Clean Water
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Women Celebrating With The Banner
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Ward Councilor Explaining What He Learned From The Hygiene Training
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Ward Councilor Abu Koroma Advising Community Members To Take Great Care Of The Pump
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Testing After Finished Installing Pump
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Testing The Cylinder
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Drilling
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Drilling
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Drilling
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Drilling
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Drilling Filter Pack
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Drilling Installation Of Four Inch Pipe
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Drilling Installation Of Six Inch Pipe
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Hygiene Facilitator Teaching About Diarhea
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Hygiene Facilitator Teaching How To Avoid Bad Hygiene Practices
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Isata Kamara
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Martha
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Participant Demonstrating One Of The Handwashing Methods
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Special Dedication
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Yield Test
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Young Man Demonstrating Handwashing Method
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Boy Carrying Water
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Boy Collecting Water
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Clothes Line
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Clothes Line
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Girl Slicing Potato Leaves
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Household
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Household
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Inside Latrine
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Inside Latrine
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Kitchen
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Lady Doing Petty Trading
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Landscape
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Landscape
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Latrine
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Latrine
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Main Well
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Petty Trading
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Quote Kadiatu Bangura
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Quote Amadu Sesay
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Water Storage
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Water Storage
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Water Storage
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Woman Cooking
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Woman Cutting Potato Leaves Stem Fot Plating
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Young Carrying Water
The Water Project: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street -  Young Girls Selling Food Stuff For Domestic Use

Project Status



Project Type:  Borehole Well and Hand Pump

Regional Program: Port Loko, Sierra Leone WaSH Program

Impact: 157 Served

Project Phase:  In Service - May 2020

Functionality Status:  Functional

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



The main water source for the 157 people who live near #24 Thullah Street in Tholmossoh, Sierra Leone is a hand-dug well. Tholmossoh is a densely populated area. The community is located between the largest market place in the Chiefdom and also minutes away from the home of the section chief Pa Alimamy Kapen Kargbo.

The water point was completed in 2009 and it has served this community successfully for nearly a decade. It was the only water point at the time of its completion, so people traveled miles to use it each day. The owner of the well is a woman by the name of Mabinty, she had asked all members of the community that fetch water from the well to do so at no cost. It is a rare instance where people can access water for free, so it makes the water point highly valued among community members.

But the well is experiencing problems. The well has recently started to go dry due to climate change causing the water table to drop. The once-reliable source of water is letting people in Tholmossoh down. As a result, people turn to another borehole well for water.

“The constant breakdown of this water point due to low water has sent our children far away from home looking for clean water,” said Santigie Seasay, a local teacher.

In 2010, we supported the construction of a new borehole in this area to alleviate the pressure on this hand-dug well. It remains a reliable source since it was dug deeper than the first well, but the large crowds, especially in the dry season, causes a lot of arguments among neighbors. People wake up as early as 4:00 AM to get to the borehole and there are still lines forming that early.

Because of the high population in the area, a hand-dug well was installed last year by another organization. But the quality of the water is unknown and it too does not work during the dry season.

“The hardest time for me is when this water well is not working,” said Ibrahim, a young boy who lives near the seasonal well.

“I have to go to other areas to fetch and it takes a lot of time away from my school work. I walk to school every day, and if I spend a lot of time fetching water I will be late for school.”

Here’s what we’re going to do about it:

Well Rehabilitation

The well marked for this overhaul is dry for a few months every year and needs major work to supply adequate, clean water to the community year round. The pump will be removed, and a hand auger will be lowered inside and powered by a drill team. This hand auger will allow the team to drill several meters deeper to hit a sufficient water column that will ensure the well supplies water throughout all seasons.

As the team drills, casing will be installed, transforming the bottom of this hand-dug well into a borehole. PVC piping will connect this lower system directly to the pump, a construction that we know will also improve the quality of water.

Once this plan is implemented, everyone within the community will have access to safe drinking water in both quality and quantity, even through the dry months.

Hygiene and Sanitation Training

There will be hygiene and sanitation training sessions offered for three days in a row.

“The hygiene and sanitation in this community has been steadily improving even though we have a long ways to go,” said Mammy Kamara.

After our visit, the hygiene and sanitation trainer decided it would be best to teach community members how to build a tippy tap (a hand-washing station built with a jerrycan, string, and sticks). They will use these tippy taps for handwashing demonstrations, and will also teach about other tools like dish racks and the importance of properly penning in animals.

These trainings will also strengthen the water user committee that manages and maintains this well. They enforce proper behavior and report to us whenever they need our help solving a serious problem, like a pump breakdown.

Project Updates


05/27/2020: Lungi, Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street Project Complete!

Please note, all photos in this report were taken before social distancing recommendations went into effect.

We are excited to share that there is a safe, reliable water point at #24 Thullah Street in Sierra Leone that is already providing clean water to students and neighboring community members! We also conducted hygiene and sanitation training, which focused on healthy practices such as handwashing and using latrines.

Clean Water Restored

Here is how we restored clean, reliable water here:

– Raised the tripod

– Found the original depth

– Socketed the pipes

– Installed casing

– Lined up the drill rods

– Drilled!

We reached a final depth of 20 meters with the water at 12 meters. The hand-drill method allowed the team to install the cylinder far below the aquifer so that the community has great water access throughout the year.

– Installed screening and filter pack

– Cemented an iron rod to the well lining, and fixed it with an iron collar at the top

– Bailed the well by hand for 3 days and flushed it

– Tested the yield

– Built a cement platform, walls, and drainage system

– Installed a stainless steel India Mk11 pump

– Conducted a water quality test

New Knowledge

Before conducting any hygiene training, we made repeated phone calls and visits to the local water user committee to better understand the challenges and lack of sanitation facilities in the community. We brought the findings from our baseline survey to the attention of the committee to help them make the necessary adjustments before the training or drilling could commence. When all the necessary guidelines were met, only then did our team of hygiene trainers go to conduct the training.

The training was held under the few remaining trees in the community. Not everyone was able to sit under the tree but the training was so interesting that some people either did not notice or were not bothered by the heat. More than 70 people attended the 3-day training. Councilor Abu Koroma was a big factor in the success of the training. He helped promote the event and rally people to attend.

The success of any project starts with the formation of a properly functioning water user committee. The water user committee is the liaison between our team and the community, and it complements the efforts of our organization to provide clean and safe water to the community. The committee also acts as a hygiene monitoring team that will penalize any member who does not comply with the guidelines set forth in the Water User Constitution. The leaders of a community, such as Mr. Koroma, play a great role in making a project successful.

Disease transmission posters.

Training topics covered included handwashing and tippy taps; good and bad hygiene; disease transmission and prevention; worms and parasites; proper care of teeth; proper care of the pump; keeping the water clean; the cost recovery system; dish racks and clotheslines; the importance of toilets; keeping the latrine clean; balanced diets; the diarrhea doll; and HIV and AIDS.

Tippy tap construction

The most memorable topic from the hygiene training was the healthy and unhealthy community exercise. The participants were divided into smaller groups and the subgroups were then given posters of unhealthy and healthy communities and asked to identify what is happening in the posters. Each group is asked to identify 6 to 8 unhealthy and healthy practices. The idea is for the entire group to identify and do something to change certain behavior in their community.

Handwashing demonstration.

The second most memorable topic was handwashing. To show the participants how diseases are transmitted, glitter is put on the hands of the trainer unbeknownst to the participants. They are instructed to check their hands after greeting each other – the spread of glitter from person to person is used to show how easily disease can spread in communities. The lesson highlights the importance of handwashing before and after certain activities.

Thank you for making all of this possible!


The Water Project : sierraleone20407-splashing-water-with-banner


04/20/2020: Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street project underway!

A severe clean water shortage at Thomossoh, #24 Thullah Street in Lungi, Sierra Leone drains community members’ time, energy, and health. Thanks to your generosity, we’re working to install a clean water point and much more.

Get to know this community through the introduction and pictures we’ve posted, and read about this water, sanitation and hygiene project. We look forward to reaching out with more good news!


The Water Project : sierraleone20407-young-carrying-water-2


Project Videos


Project Photos


Project Type

Borehole and Hand Pump

Girls and women walk long distances for water when safe water is very often right under their feet! Underground rivers, called aquifers, often contain a constant supply of safe water – but you have to get to it. No matter what machine or piece of equipment is used, all drilling is aiming for a borehole that reaches into an aquifer. If the aquifer has water - and after the well is developed - we are able to pull water to the surface utilizing a hand-pump. If all goes as planned, the community is left with a safe, closed water source providing around 5 gallons of water a minute through a hand-pump.


Contributors

Project Sponsor - Yakima Foursquare Church