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The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Child At The Complete Well
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Child Celebrates The Well
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Community Members At The Well
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Splashing Water From The Well
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Splashing At The Well
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Smiles For Reliable Water
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Chlorination
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Dedication Celebration
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Drilling
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Drilling
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Drilling
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Drilling
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Drilling
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Drilling
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Drilling
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Drilling
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Drilling
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Drilling
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Drilling
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Happy At The Well
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Ibrahim Sorie Bangura
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Kids Celebrate At The Well
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Nanah B
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Pad Construction
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Pad Construction
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Pad Construction
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Yield Test
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Bad Hygiene Discussion
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Bad Hygiene Poster
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Balanced Diet Lesson
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Community Health Lesson
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Diarrhea Lesson
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Disease Transmission Poster Session
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Hygiene And Sanitation Training
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Hygiene Training
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Importance Of Latrines
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Mosquito Net Demonstration
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Bassie Kamara
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Bath Shelter
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Clothes Line
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Household
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Household
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Kid Carrying Water
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Lady Carrying Water
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Lady Carrying Water
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Lady Carrying Water
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Lady Pounding Pepper
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Landscape
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Latrine
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Mabinty Bangura
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Palm Kernel
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Small Girl Collecting Water
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Tailor
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Tele Center To Recharge Phones Batteries
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Water Storage
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Water Storage
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Woman Collecting Water
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Woman Cooking
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Woman Fetching Water
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Woman Processing Palm Oil
The Water Project: Lokomasama, Rotain Village -  Woman Selling Bread

Project Status



Project Type:  Borehole Well and Hand Pump

Regional Program: Port Loko, Sierra Leone WaSH Program

Impact: 300 Served

Project Phase:  In Service - Apr 2021

Functionality Status:  Functional

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



Community Profile

The main water point for the 670 people living in Rotain Village collapsed 3 years ago. It is centrally located for this community, but because it does not work, people turn to the nearest swamp every day to get water necessary for cooking, cleaning, washing and drinking.

Junior secondary school student Mabinty feels the pressure of having to balance fetching water and going to school. She said she takes up to 10 trips each morning to the swamp to get enough water for her family. She then has to walk for more than an hour to get to school.

“Most times, I go to school on an empty stomach, and after the long walk, I cannot pay attention to the teachers,” she said.

“Not having clean water in the village causes a lot of delays. I don’t know how much longer I will be able to do this routine. I am honestly tired. Marrying at this age might be better.”

The far distance from the home to the swamp also increases the dropout rate of most children in the village. Having to make repeated trips to the swamp to fetch water and then make way to school is a major contributing factor to the village’s illiteracy rate. All of this effort is to collect water that is unsafe for drinking.

The water point is surrounded by dark mud and open to the contamination that leads people to contract waterborne diseases. Cases of dysentery and cholera are common here due to drinking water from this source.

The community well marked for this overhaul needs major work to supply adequate, clean water to the community year-round. The pump will be removed, and a hand auger will be lowered inside and powered by a drill team. This hand auger will allow the team to drill several meters deeper to hit a sufficient water column to ensure the well supplies water throughout all seasons.

As the team drills, casing will be installed, transforming the bottom of this hand-dug well into a borehole. PVC piping will connect this lower system directly to the pump, a construction that we know will also improve the quality of water.

Once this plan is implemented, everyone within the community will have access to safe drinking water in quality and quantity, even through the dry months.

The most common livelihoods in this community are processing palm oil and farming. Rotain means hill or mountain, and it’s an apt name for this community located among the hills of Lokomasama. The village is made up of Temne speaking people but nestled between two Susu speaking villages. It creates a strong multicultural community where most homes are built near the town center.

Many homes here do not have latrines. Those that do are often made up of sticks that are tied in a circle. The sticks are tied together with bush rope strong enough to tie anything. Empty rice bags are then used to wrap around the sticks to create a wall. All the latrines we observed lack soap and handwashing stations.

To improve overall hygiene and sanitation in this community, training sessions will be offered for three days in a row.

After our visit, the hygiene and sanitation trainer decided it would be best to teach community members how to build a tippy tap (a hand-washing station built with a jerrycan, string, and sticks). They will use these tippy taps for handwashing demonstrations and will also teach about other tools like dish racks and the importance of properly penning in animals.

This training will also strengthen the water user committee that manages and maintains this well. They enforce proper behavior and report to us whenever they need our help solving a serious problem, like a

Project Updates


04/09/2021: Rotain Village Project Complete!

We are excited to share a safe, reliable water point at Rotain Village in Sierra Leone is already providing clean water to students and neighboring community members! We also conducted hygiene and sanitation training, which focused on healthy practices such as handwashing and using latrines.

“I am very happy to have this water well in the village and very thankful for the help. My mother is always on my case to go and fetch water at the stream, but thanks to this organization, I don’t have to travel far to get clean water,” said young Saidu.

“Now that this water point is complete, I can spend more time getting ready for school and can walk the two miles to school with ease.”

Clean Water Restored

The drill team arrived the day before beginning work. They set up camp and unpacked all of their tools and supplies to prepare for drilling the next day. The community provided space for them to store their belongings and meals for the duration of their stay. The following day, the work began.

Here is how we restored clean, reliable water here:

– Raised the tripod

– Found the original depth

– Socketed the pipes

– Installed casing

– Lined up the drill rods

– Drilled!


The hand-drill method allowed the team to install the cylinder far below the aquifer so that the community has great water access throughout the year.

– Installed screening and filter pack

– Cemented an iron rod to the well lining and fixed it with an iron collar at the top

– Bailed the well by hand for three days and flushed it

– Tested the yield

– Built a cement platform, walls, and drainage system

– Installed a stainless steel India Mk11 pump

– Conducted a water quality test

This community had the biggest turnout on the day the well was handed over to them. The celebration gathered people from all over the surrounding villages. Some people came to celebrate with the community, while others came to see how they could be candidates for a similar water project. All were welcome.

The youth leader, members of the water user committee, a local councilor, town chief, headman, and a representative sent by the councilor in the neighboring ward, attended the ceremony. People sang and danced in celebration of their reliable source of water.

“Carrying my child while I go to the stream to fetch water is risky and time-consuming, but I was left with no option – there was nothing else I could do. Having clean and safe water is very important, but as for me, having the well in the village is more important than anything,” said Isatu Kamara.

New Knowledge

Before conducting any hygiene training, we make repeated phone calls and visits to the local water user committee to better understand the community’s challenges and lack of sanitation facilities. We share the findings from our discussions with the committee members to help them make the necessary adjustments before the training begins. For example, we identify households without handwashing stations or those that may need to repair their latrines. With this information, community members can work together to improve hygiene and satiation at home.

After that, we schedule a time when members from each household using the water point can attend multi-day hygiene and sanitation training. When that is set, we dispatch our teams to the agreed-upon location to hold the meeting.

The area for the training was open, ventilated, and spacious. Palm kernel oil could be smelled all over the village. The processing of the oil was stopped for the time the team was there to reduce the poignant smell that is unbearable to most people.

Training topics covered included handwashing and tippy taps; good and bad hygiene; disease transmission and prevention; worms and parasites; proper care of teeth; proper care of the pump; keeping the water clean; the cost recovery system; dish racks and clotheslines; the importance of toilets; keeping the latrine clean; balanced diets; the diarrhea doll; and HIV and AIDS.

The most memorable topic during the hygiene training was keeping the water clean. There is a lot to do when it comes to keeping water clean, and it takes the effort of everyone in the community. When the topic is taught, the first thing that typically comes to mind is keeping the source – the well – clean. But it goes much further than that and includes a process to adhere to each time water is fetched. Keeping the water clean is a topic that targets the source of the water, transporting the water from the source, and storage at home.

It was during this topic that the mention of dirty water containers used to fetch water quickly brought curious looks and grins. The participants started looking around, and there was a container by the training area. The trainers asked who the owner of the container was and a middle-aged lady stood up. She was asked what the container was used for, and her reply was shocking. She replied by saying it is used for chores around the home. Starting from bathing, doing laundry, fetching water for drinking, and fetching water for cooking. It is something that happens in all communities. A rubber bucket or container can be used for several purposes, which increases the chances of disease transmission.

“The most helpful part of the training I received was the topic on proper handwashing and the use of face masks. The face masks that are locally made are the best for most people in my community and me. The locally-made face masks are for multiple uses and are more cost-effective. The single-use face masks are sometimes used by other people more than once, which is absolutely wrong,” said Mabinty Kamara.

Thank you for making all of this possible!


The Water Project : sierraleone20420-kids-celebrate-at-the-well


02/22/2021: Lokomasama, Rotain Village project underway!

A severe clean water shortage at Rotain Village drains peoples’ time, energy, and health. Thanks to your generosity, we’re working to install a clean water point and much more.

Get to know this community through the introduction and pictures we’ve posted, and read about this water, sanitation, and hygiene project. We look forward to reaching out with more good news!


The Water Project : sierraleone20420-woman-collecting-water-2


Project Photos


Project Type

Borehole and Hand Pump

Girls and women walk long distances for water when safe water is very often right under their feet! Underground rivers, called aquifers, often contain a constant supply of safe water – but you have to get to it. No matter what machine or piece of equipment is used, all drilling is aiming for a borehole that reaches into an aquifer. If the aquifer has water - and after the well is developed - we are able to pull water to the surface utilizing a hand-pump. If all goes as planned, the community is left with a safe, closed water source providing around 5 gallons of water a minute through a hand-pump.


Contributors

ALKA POOL
Steve Covert
Liam Lowe Memorial
@oh.mysoap
113 individual donor(s)