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The Water Project: Kamasondo, Madick Village -  Carrying Water
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Madick Village -  Helping To Mount Water On Her Head
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Madick Village -  Alternate Water Source
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Madick Village -  House Of The Secret Society
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Madick Village -  Planting Ground Nut
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Madick Village -  The Heads Of The Secret Society
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Madick Village -  Farm House
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Madick Village -  Latrine
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Madick Village -  Skeiku K
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Madick Village -  Girl Preparing Food
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Madick Village -  Kitchen
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Madick Village -  Processing Palm Oil
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Madick Village -  Cooking
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Madick Village -  Alternate Water Source
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Madick Village -  Clothesline
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Madick Village -  Carrying Water
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Madick Village -  Kitchen With Dish Rack
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Madick Village -  Woman Slicing Potato Leaves
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Madick Village -  Animal House
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Madick Village -  Roofing A Farm House
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Madick Village -  Main Water Source
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Madick Village -  Carpenter Roofing A House
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Madick Village -  Household
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Madick Village -  Dish Rack
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Madick Village -  Household
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Madick Village -  A Place Where The God Charse Of The Village Dwells
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Madick Village -  Mosque
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Madick Village -  Household
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Madick Village -  Household
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Madick Village -  Inside Mosque
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Madick Village -  Water Storage
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Madick Village -  Water Storage
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Madick Village -  Pa Almamy Kargbo
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Madick Village -  Bath Shelter
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Madick Village -  Plucking Palm Kernel
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Madick Village -  Processing Charcoal
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Madick Village -  Fetching Water

Project Status



Project Type:  Borehole Well and Hand Pump

Regional Program: Port Loko, Sierra Leone WaSH Program

Project Phase:  Funded - Project Initiated
Estimated Install Date (?):  01/29/2022

Project Features


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Madick Village is a rural community that depends on fishing and farming. It is a very peaceful community covered with fresh vegetation that helps lend shade and a little cool air amidst the hot climate. During the day, the young women and men go to their different farming and fishing points while older people sit on their verandas and the domestic animals roam about. Most buildings in this community are made of mud blocks, and some are plastered with cement.

The biggest livelihood in this community of 272 people is selling their farm produce in the nearby Borope town. Every Thursday, market women from all over the chiefdom and even neighboring chiefdoms bring their goods to Borope town to sell. This day is always recognized as a big market day, known locally as a “Luma” day. Since most extended families farm together, they also sell at the luma and collect profits together under the family head, the main person who looks after and represents each extended family.

Despite the natural vegetation and farming here, however, community members are experiencing a severe water crisis when it comes to accessing enough clean and reliable water.

The community’s protected well has not worked for years. As a result, people now rely on a deep hole dug into the earth for water. They fetch it by lowering buckets attached to long sticks into the hole and pulling them back up again. The hole is unprotected, uncovered, and unsafe, with a great deal of uncertainty about how long the land around the hole will remain intact before caving in. All manner of leaves, insects, soil, and small animals fall into the hole and rot, contaminating the water even further.

This makeshift unprotected well is far from the village, and it is right at the edge of the bush where all sorts of animals, including dangerous ones, come and drink. The long walk to the well leads to delays in community members’ daily schedules, especially for women and children. Mothers return home late in preparing meals for their families, particularly in the morning. Children, as a result, are always late for school because they either had to go to the well themselves, had to wait for their mothers’ return to eat breakfast, or both.

“My great-grandparents are the founders of this village. This well has been down before I was born,” said Alimamy, a young teenage boy we met, referring to the protected well currently in disrepair.

“The only alternate water source we have is the unprotected well, and we children and women go to there to fetch water. This affects our schooling. Sometimes we go to school after the first period because we have to walk the long distance to school after fetching water.”

Here’s what we’re going to do about it:

Well Rehabilitation

The well marked for this overhaul is dry for a few months every year and needs major work to supply adequate, clean water to the community year-round. The pump will be removed, and a hand auger will be lowered inside and powered by a drill team. This hand auger will allow the team to drill several meters deeper to hit a sufficient water column to ensure the well supplies water throughout all seasons.

As the team drills, the casing will be installed, transforming the bottom of this hand-dug well into a borehole. PVC piping will connect this lower system directly to the pump, a construction that we know will also improve the quality of water.

Once this plan is implemented, everyone within the community will have access to safe drinking water in quality and quantity, even through the dry months.

Hygiene and Sanitation Training

There will be hygiene and sanitation training sessions offered for three days in a row.

After our visit, the hygiene and sanitation trainer decided it would be best to teach community members how to build a tippy tap (a hand-washing station built with a jerrycan, string, and sticks). They will use these tippy taps for handwashing demonstrations and will also teach about other tools like dish racks and the importance of properly penning in animals.

This training will also strengthen the water user committee that manages and maintains this well. They enforce proper behavior and report to us whenever they need our help solving a serious problem, like a pump breakdown.

We're just getting started, check back soon!


Project Photos


Project Type

Borehole and Hand Pump

Girls and women walk long distances for water when safe water is very often right under their feet! Underground rivers, called aquifers, often contain a constant supply of safe water – but you have to get to it. No matter what machine or piece of equipment is used, all drilling is aiming for a borehole that reaches into an aquifer. If the aquifer has water - and after the well is developed - we are able to pull water to the surface utilizing a hand-pump. If all goes as planned, the community is left with a safe, closed water source providing around 5 gallons of water a minute through a hand-pump.


Contributors

Project Sponsor - StossWater