Loading images...
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 1 -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 1 -  Carrying Water
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 1 -  Alternate Water Source
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 1 -  Bath Shelter
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 1 -  Returning Home From Fishing
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 1 -  Charcoal Processing
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 1 -  Clothesline
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 1 -  Community Members
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 1 -  Dishrack
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 1 -  Household
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 1 -  Household
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 1 -  Household
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 1 -  Inside Latrine
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 1 -  Inside Latrine
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 1 -  Latrine
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 1 -  Latrine
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 1 -  Main Well
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 1 -  Oldest Woman In The Village
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 1 -  Outdoor Cook Stove
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 1 -  Palm Kernel
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 1 -  Processing Charcoal
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 1 -  Water Storage
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 1 -  Woman Carrying Laundry
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 1 -  Woman Pounding Rice
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 1 -  Women Work Together To Lift Water Bucket
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 1 -  Bags Of Charcoal

Project Status



Project Type:  Borehole Well and Hand Pump

Regional Program: Port Loko, Sierra Leone WaSH Program

Project Phase:  Funded - Project Initiated
Estimated Install Date (?):  12/31/2021

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



A hunter founded Bross village, given its name by the people who settled there. Bross means ashes in the Temne language, referencing the hunter’s fire to smoke their meat. After some time, the settlement expanded into two villages bearing the same name. People eventually left the original Bross village and settled in what is now called Bross 2 Village and later expanded into Bross 3.

The 109 people in Bross 1 make a living through farming, petty trading, and fishing. The other main livelihood is charcoal production. The community has cut down many large trees that are over a hundred years old to turn them into charcoal. Though productive for sales, this is also quickly contributing to deforestation of the land in this area.

The main water source here is an open swamp. This community has been drinking this water for more than ten years. The quality of the water is very poor because it is open to contaminants. When someone comes to fetch water, they may see someone bathing in the swamp and another person washing clothes. As a result, cases of waterborne diseases are frequent here.

Sallieu Bangura is the oldest member of the community. We spoke with him when we visited the village. He has accepted the fact of never having clean water again in the community due to their broken-down well. The well has been non-functional for so long that he has forgotten how many years it has been, he said.

But that does not have to be Mr. Bangura’s reality. A safe, reliable water source is possible for him and all of Bross 1.

We will rehabilitate the well that has sat unused for years to supply clean water to the community year-round. To do it, our teams will remove the pump and then lower a hand auger inside the well. This hand auger will allow the team to drill several meters deeper to hit a sufficient water column to ensure the well supplies water throughout all seasons.

As the team drills, the casing will be installed, transforming the bottom of this hand-dug well into a borehole. PVC piping will connect this lower system directly to the pump, which we know will also improve water quality. Once this plan is implemented, everyone within the community will have access to safe drinking water, even through the dry months.

The hygiene and sanitation in the village are very poor and need improvement, reported our team. We will offer hygiene and sanitation training sessions for three days in a row.

After our visit, the hygiene and sanitation trainer decided it would be best to teach community members how to build a tippy tap (a handwashing station built with a jerrycan, string, and sticks). They will use these tippy taps for handwashing demonstrations and teach other tools like dish racks and the importance of properly penning in animals.

This training will also strengthen the water user committee that manages and maintains this well. They enforce proper behavior and report to us whenever they need help solving a serious problem, like a pump breakdown.

We're just getting started, check back soon!


Project Photos


Project Type

Borehole and Hand Pump

Girls and women walk long distances for water when safe water is very often right under their feet! Underground rivers, called aquifers, often contain a constant supply of safe water – but you have to get to it. No matter what machine or piece of equipment is used, all drilling is aiming for a borehole that reaches into an aquifer. If the aquifer has water - and after the well is developed - we are able to pull water to the surface utilizing a hand-pump. If all goes as planned, the community is left with a safe, closed water source providing around 5 gallons of water a minute through a hand-pump.


Contributors

Project Sponsor - StossWater