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The Water Project: Petifu Junction Community 5 -  Collecting Water
The Water Project: Petifu Junction Community 5 -  Abu B
The Water Project: Petifu Junction Community 5 -  Abu Carrying Water
The Water Project: Petifu Junction Community 5 -  Abu Collecting Water
The Water Project: Petifu Junction Community 5 -  Alternate Water Source
The Water Project: Petifu Junction Community 5 -  Alternate Water Source
The Water Project: Petifu Junction Community 5 -  Bathing Shelter
The Water Project: Petifu Junction Community 5 -  Bathing Shelter
The Water Project: Petifu Junction Community 5 -  Clothesline
The Water Project: Petifu Junction Community 5 -  Clothesline
The Water Project: Petifu Junction Community 5 -  Collecting Water
The Water Project: Petifu Junction Community 5 -  Community Court Barray
The Water Project: Petifu Junction Community 5 -  Community Landscape
The Water Project: Petifu Junction Community 5 -  Community Landscape
The Water Project: Petifu Junction Community 5 -  Community Mosque
The Water Project: Petifu Junction Community 5 -  Dishrack
The Water Project: Petifu Junction Community 5 -  Dishrack
The Water Project: Petifu Junction Community 5 -  Garbage
The Water Project: Petifu Junction Community 5 -  Garbage
The Water Project: Petifu Junction Community 5 -  Household
The Water Project: Petifu Junction Community 5 -  Household
The Water Project: Petifu Junction Community 5 -  Inside A Kitchen
The Water Project: Petifu Junction Community 5 -  Jeneba Carrying Water
The Water Project: Petifu Junction Community 5 -  Jeneba Collecting Water
The Water Project: Petifu Junction Community 5 -  Jeneba Sabojeh
The Water Project: Petifu Junction Community 5 -  Kitchen
The Water Project: Petifu Junction Community 5 -  Kitchen
The Water Project: Petifu Junction Community 5 -  Latrine
The Water Project: Petifu Junction Community 5 -  Latrine
The Water Project: Petifu Junction Community 5 -  Laundering Clothes At Stream
The Water Project: Petifu Junction Community 5 -  Main Well To Rehab
The Water Project: Petifu Junction Community 5 -  Man Carrying Water
The Water Project: Petifu Junction Community 5 -  Processing Palm Nut
The Water Project: Petifu Junction Community 5 -  Water Storage Containers
The Water Project: Petifu Junction Community 5 -  Water Storage Containers
The Water Project: Petifu Junction Community 5 -  Woman Cooking Foo Foo
The Water Project: Petifu Junction Community 5 -  Woman Drying Fish

Project Status



Project Type:  Borehole Well and Hand Pump

Regional Program: Port Loko, Sierra Leone WaSH Program

Project Phase:  Donate to this Project
Estimated Install Date (?):  11/18/2022

Project Features


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The protected dug well and hand pump currently used by the 115 community members in Petifu Junction cannot provide sufficient water for everyone. Seasonal drying leaves the well without water for over half the year, and people must resort to alternative water from the local swamp.

Most people in Petifu Junction depend on farming and palm oil processing to make their living, but without enough water, production lessens and incomes reduce, making everything more challenging.

Abu B., 15, in the photo above, said, “Every day, I must fetch water for my parents at home. It is not easy to fetch water because the distance to the swamp is far and hilly.”

Abu has to collect water in the morning before school but he also has to trek back to the swamp again later in the day after school because it’s impossible for him to collect sufficient water to meet his family’s needs in one trip.

It is especially difficult to find clean drinking water, so community members need to boil the collected swamp water, which is time-consuming and laborious. The risk of becoming sick with water-related illnesses is a real threat because not only is there not clean water to drink but there is also not enough water to clean latrines or practice regular hand washing.

Petty trader Jeneba Sabolleh, 45, above collecting water from the swamp said, “The activities at the swamp always make the water filthy and not good to drink. I know that the swamp water is not good for drinking, which is why I boil and filter it before drinking [it], especially when it is filthy.”

Lacking water in the community has many far-reaching effects. As noted by Jeneba, “[The] water crisis in this village is limiting the activities that I complete for a day.”

And for Abu’s family, it means going without food, drinking water, and clean clothes at times. When he can’t collect enough water, his mother cannot cook meals, and they go hungry. In addition to hauling heavy jugs of water, he also carries his uniforms to the swamp to launder them because there is not enough water at home. All of these things leave him exhausted.

Here’s what we’re going to do about it:

Well Rehabilitation

The well marked for this overhaul is dry for a few months every year and needs major work to supply adequate, clean water to the community year round. The pump will be removed, and a hand auger will be lowered inside and powered by a drill team. This hand auger will allow the team to drill several meters deeper to hit a sufficient water column that will ensure the well supplies water throughout all seasons.

As the team drills, casing will be installed, transforming the bottom of this hand-dug well into a borehole. PVC piping will connect this lower system directly to the pump, a construction that we know will also improve the quality of water.

Once this plan is implemented, everyone within the community will have access to safe drinking water in both quality and quantity, even through the dry months.

Hygiene and Sanitation Training

There will be hygiene and sanitation training sessions offered for three days in a row.

After our visit, the hygiene and sanitation trainer decided it would be best to teach community members how to build a tippy tap (a hand-washing station built with a jerrycan, string, and sticks). They will use these tippy taps for handwashing demonstrations, and will also teach about other tools like dish racks and the importance of properly penning in animals.

These trainings will also strengthen the water user committee that manages and maintains this well. They enforce proper behavior and report to us whenever they need our help solving a serious problem, like a pump breakdown.

We're just getting started, check back soon!


Project Photos


Project Type

Borehole and Hand Pump

Girls and women walk long distances for water when safe water is very often right under their feet! Underground rivers, called aquifers, often contain a constant supply of safe water – but you have to get to it. No matter what machine or piece of equipment is used, all drilling is aiming for a borehole that reaches into an aquifer. If the aquifer has water - and after the well is developed - we are able to pull water to the surface utilizing a hand-pump. If all goes as planned, the community is left with a safe, closed water source providing around 5 gallons of water a minute through a hand-pump.


Contributors