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The Water Project: Lungi, Malokoh Well Rehabilitation -
The Water Project: Lungi, Malokoh Well Rehabilitation -
The Water Project: Lungi, Malokoh Well Rehabilitation -
The Water Project: Lungi, Malokoh Well Rehabilitation -
The Water Project: Lungi, Malokoh Well Rehabilitation -
The Water Project: Lungi, Malokoh Well Rehabilitation -
The Water Project: Lungi, Malokoh Well Rehabilitation -
The Water Project: Lungi, Malokoh Well Rehabilitation -
The Water Project: Lungi, Malokoh Well Rehabilitation -
The Water Project: Lungi, Malokoh Well Rehabilitation -
The Water Project: Lungi, Malokoh Well Rehabilitation -

Project Status



Project Type:  Well Rehab

Program: Water for Sierra Leone

Impact: 500 Served

Project Phase:  Decommissioned

Functionality Status:  Decommissioned

Project Features


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Community Profile

This project was implemented by another partner, but is now monitored and maintained by The Water Project together with Mariatu’s Hope.

When the Sierra Leone team arrived, the pump was not in a good working condition, the cylinder and sucker rod were rusted and the casing was not properly sunk. The Sierra Leone team restored the casing and lining, sank the casing, poured cement and installed new pump. There were 500 residents who had been forced to depend on a river located two kilometers away from the community to meet all of their water needs. Because of this and the community’s practice of open defecation, families were suffering from dysentery, malaria, typhoid, diarrhea and severe dehydration among other preventable water related illnesses. During the team’s stay, community members assembled a water committee consisting of five men and five women who assisted the team with the water project whenever possible, provided food and guarded the team’s equipment during the night. This water committee is also responsible for collecting a well maintenance fee of 100 Ugandan Shillings per 20 liter jerry can collected. Most residents farm, garden or petty trade to earn a living and a few teach at the nearby school. There is a school located two kilometers away from the community whose students, teachers and administrative personnel all now have access to a safe water source.

The Sierra Leone team had an opportunity to meet with fifty-three year old community member and petty trader, Adama B.S. Kanu, who stated, “The old source is a big stream where people usually launder their clothes, and kids are toileting nearby stream. Leaves fall and the color of the water changes. The new hand pump makes them feel good and happy to have access to clean water which will make them healthy.”

All the adults participated in the hygiene training and were attentive in listening to us and were also happy and willing to have their tippy tap rubber and could make a tippy tap for themselves. At the time we did tippy- tap at Malokoh, the people at Mabeseneh Road by then did not know the importance of it until the time they went house to house and the community people of Malokoh taught them how to use the tippy tap. They were excited to have a tippy-tap at their houses. That is why the number of participants was high, and we had a one gallon rubber to make tippy-tap for them. The community provided their own rubbers for the tippy taps. Adults were 70, Children 5 and ORS spoons 60. Since this is a new WASH committee set up at this well, no money had been collected. The committee has been instructed that they will need to impose a fee for water so when the pump has problems they can repair it themselves.

Project Updates


03/03/2018: New Intervention in Malokoh Community

The initial project in this community (seen in the reporting found on this page) is a display of our shared commitment to helping this community with first time water access. Equally as important to the community and The Water Project is ongoing support to make sure that water is reliable, day after day, year after year. This is why we monitor all our projects. Over time we’ve found that the water table has dropped in this area, limiting the intended benefit of this well. Though not common, this does happen from time to time.  

Because of our commitment to people in this community (and the lasting impact that our supporters want to make), we’ve drilled this well deeper in order to access a deeper, higher yield aquifer. This work will ensure that clean water is accessible here year round. To see that work, click here.


The Water Project : 46-sierraleone5111-clean-water-celebration


07/11/2013: Lungi, Malokoh Project Complete!

We are excited to report that the community of Malokoh in Lungi, Sierra Leone, has a new source of safe, clean water.  We just posted a report from our partner in the field including information about the community, GPS coordinates, and pictures of the project.  Thank you for your help!


The Water Project : sierraleone5034_page_07_image_0001


Project Photos


Project Type

Well rehabilitation is one of the most cost effective ways to bring clean, safe water to a community.  Sometimes it involves fixing a broken hand pump, other times it means sealing a hand dug well to prevent it from being contaminated.  These repairs, and often time total replacements, coupled with sanitation and hygiene training make a huge impact in communities.



Contributors

Project Sponsor - Northwest Hills United Methodist Church