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The Water Project: Bura Community Well -
The Water Project: Bura Community Well -
The Water Project: Bura Community Well -
The Water Project: Bura Community Well -
The Water Project: Bura Community Well -
The Water Project: Bura Community Well -
The Water Project: Bura Community Well -
The Water Project: Bura Community Well -
The Water Project: Bura Community Well -
The Water Project: Bura Community Well -
The Water Project: Bura Community Well -
The Water Project: Bura Community Well -
The Water Project: Bura Community Well -
The Water Project: Bura Community Well -
The Water Project: Bura Community Well -
The Water Project: Bura Community Well -
The Water Project: Bura Community Well -
The Water Project: Bura Community Well -
The Water Project: Bura Community Well -
The Water Project: Bura Community Well -
The Water Project: Bura Community Well -
The Water Project: Bura Community Well -
The Water Project: Bura Community Well -
The Water Project: Bura Community Well -
The Water Project: Bura Community Well -
The Water Project: Bura Community Well -
The Water Project: Bura Community Well -
The Water Project: Bura Community Well -
The Water Project: Bura Community Well -
The Water Project: Bura Community Well -
The Water Project: Bura Community Well -
The Water Project: Bura Community Well -
The Water Project: Bura Community Well -

Project Status



Project Type:  Borehole Well and Hand Pump

Program: Wells for Sudan

Impact: 300 Served

Project Phase:  Installed - Oct 2011

Functionality Status:  Partner Monitoring Unavailable

Last Checkup: 08/05/2015

Project Features


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Community Profile

Our implementing partner recently completed a new well for the Bura Community in South Sudan.  While they were developing the project, they met with Cecilia and Kwori who shared some of their story.

“I’m Cecilia Poni and I am Southern Sudanese by Nationality. I am 28 years old, and married to my beloved husband with whom God has blessed us with three children. Currently, I am living with my children. I was born at the time of the Anyanya uprising  (a rebel group in Sudan). During this time my parents suffered greatly  and were forced to flee into exile.”

“While in exile, our family lived in Bombo, Uganda, until 2006. It was not easy to meet our basic needs and finding clean water  was always a problem.”

“In my village, we have been using both the  existing well and the stream because the only borehole we had was always congested. Sometimes people fight over who takes water first. We always prayed to God over and over again for another water source and I’m so happy He has heard our cry.”

“I’m filled with happiness today to be among the witness of the drilling. I extend my sincere thanks to all the people who have toiled this much to make the drilling a success. May the lord bless you mightily.”

 

 

“My name is Kwori Moses, a Southern Sudanese residing at Bura Village, Kajo-Keji County. I’m 55 years old and married with four children. I was born in this village in 1956 after the beginning of Anyanya war, but we remained here until 1989.

“During the Sudan People Liberation Movement/Army (SPLM/A), we fled for exile in Bugerere, Uganda in 1991. We came back to our home village in January 2005 after the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) was signed in Naivasha, Kenya.”

“Bura is one of the villages facing water crises, as it is a very dry region. There is a borehole in the nearby village, but is too congested to get water everyday. My wife leaves the home at 6:00 am and comes back at 4:00 pm to gather water for the family. This encourages us sometimes to fetch water from the nearby stream.”

I appreciate the donor and the Baptist mission for bringing to us this borehole and I thank them so much. May God bless you all in the name of Jesus.”

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Project Photos


Project Type

Borehole and Hand Pump

Girls and women walk long distances for water when safe water is very often right under their feet! Underground rivers, called aquifers, often contain a constant supply of safe water – but you have to get to it. No matter what machine or piece of equipment is used, all drilling is aiming for a borehole that reaches into an aquifer. If the aquifer has water - and after the well is developed - we are able to pull water to the surface utilizing a hand-pump. If all goes as planned, the community is left with a safe, closed water source providing around 5 gallons of water a minute through a hand-pump.


I'm filled with happiness today to be among the witness of the drilling. I extend my sincere thanks to all the people who gave.

Cecilia P. - Community Member