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The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Ayebale Julius
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Cement Dries At The Well Pad
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Construction
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Construction And Brick Work
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Construction
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Fetching Water At The Well
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Jane Fetching Water
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Karungi Peace
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Katusabe Jane
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Kids Collect Water
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Kids Fetching Water
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  People At The Completed Well
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  People Participate In Activities
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Pumping The Well
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Recharge Analysis
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Shock Chlorinating The Well
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Training
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Training
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Training
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Training
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Training Attendees
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Well
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Bathing Shelter
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Bathing Shelter
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Bathing Shelter
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Busingye At His Refuse Pit
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Carrying Water
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Carrying Water From Open Source
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Carrying Water On Bike
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Carrying Water
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Chicken Coop
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Chicken Coop And Livestock Pen
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Chicken Coop
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Collecting Water From Rainwater Tank
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Collecting Water
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Compound
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Dish Drying Rack
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Dish Rack
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Dish Rack
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Drinking Water
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Farm Work
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Farming
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Handwashing
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  John Wamani
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Katusabe Gerald Fetching Water From The Open Well
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Kitchen
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Kitchen
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Kitchen
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Latrine
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Latrine
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Latrine
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Latrine
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Latrine And Bathing Shelter
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Latrine And Handwashing Station
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Latrine And Handwashing Station
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Livestock Pen
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Loading Water Containers Onto Bike
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Margaret Alinatwe
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Margerate Nabulia
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Mary Kahira
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Mr Katusabe Gerald Fetching Water From The Open Well
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Open Source
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Posing At Open Source
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Pouring Water For Drinking
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Pouring Water For Drinking
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Returning Home With Water
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Throwing Away Trash
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Washing Hands At Station
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Water Container And Cup
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  Working Farm
The Water Project: Kimigi Kyamatama Community -  At Distant Well

Project Status



Project Type:  Dug Well and Hand Pump

Regional Program: Western Uganda WaSH Program

Impact: 290 Served

Project Phase:  In Service - Aug 2019

Functionality Status:  Project Monitoring Data Delayed

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



Community Profile

Margaret Nabulia is a 35-year-old widow with 6 children living in Kimigi Kyamatama, Uganda. She is a peasant farmer growing beans, cassava, maize, and groundnuts. Margaret lost her husband in 2015, and since then two of her children dropped out of school because she could not afford school fees. Luckily three of her girls now go to a government school under Uganda’s universal primary education scheme.

When Margaret’s husband died, she decided to lease one hector of their family land to a sugarcane grower. Before her husband died, they had started building a two-bedroom house for their family in Kimigi Kyamatama. The landscape is gently sloping undulating valleys with expansive fragmented farmland. A typical household here has one or two huts made of grass thatched roofs and wattle wall.

Margaret and her children used to draw drinking water from a protected government borehole that took a 1-hour walking round trip. This borehole is now in the middle of a sugar cane plantation. A month ago, there were reports of strangers hiding in the sugar plantation stalking children who moved to collect water.

It is believed by Margaret that these strangers engage in child sacrifice rituals since they believe it is a source of wealth. Local Council Chairman Alituha Emmanuel expressed the same concerns as Margaret because he received reports the previous day that some strangers were identified in the neighborhoods allegedly stalking children traveling to school. As a result, Margaret and her children now fear walking to the government borehole.

Margaret and her children turned to another borehole that is twice as far away to ensure their safety. They have to walk through two large swamps to access this water point. When it rains, the swamps flood and all pathways are blocked. At that point, the only water source at their disposal is an open source 20 minutes away from her home (pictured above).

When Margaret was asked about any sickness from this dirty water, she said, “My family suffered diarrhea since I opted for the open water source.”

The story is similar for Mary Kahira, a 58-year-old peasant farmer from the community. Mary often worries about the security of her children in pursuit of clean and protected water source since the nearest borehole is through a sugarcane plantation.

“My children walk long distances for clean drinking water since the nearest water point is not protected,” she said.

Due to the constraints of distance and security of her children, Mary at times draws water from the unprotected source. This has led to her children falling sick from diarrhea which has cost her money and time that she could have used for productive purposes.

But these stories will be pushed to the past with the construction of a new hand-dug well in the community. Mary and Margaret expressed optimism about their futures knowing that a new water point will arrive soon.

“I am hopeful that the ongoing construction of a safe water point would relieve the water condition of my family,” said Margaret.

Here’s what we’re going to do about it:

New Hand-Dug Well

With the guidance of our artisans and mechanics, the excavated well will be cased, sealed with a well pad, and then finished with a new Consallen pump. The community will participate in excavating and constructing the water source.

Excavation takes a month or more on average, depending on the nature of the rock beneath. Construction of the well lining and installation of the pump takes on average 12 days.

This well will be located in Kimigi Community and will bring clean water closer to families having to walk long distances for their water.

Improved Sanitation

The aim is that all households own an improved latrine. Many households do not use a latrine but use the bush. Due to open defecation, feces are spread all over the village. This leads to waterborne diseases and contamination of groundwater and surface water. Our aim is that the community is able to live a healthy life free of preventable diseases. We endeavor that at the end of our presence in the community, people will have both access to sustainable, clean water and access to sanitation. We have now organized families to form digging groups for latrine construction, and empowered them with tools to use.

Training

Training’s main objectives are the use of latrines and observing proper hygiene practices since these goals are inherently connected to the provision of clean water. Open defecation, water storage in unclean containers and the absence of handwashing are all possible contaminants of a household water supply. Each participating village must achieve Open Defecation Free status (defined by one latrine per household), prior to the pump installation for a shallow hand-dug well.

This social program includes the assignment of one Community Development Officer (CDO) to each village. The CDO encourages each household to build an ideal homestead that includes: a latrine, handwashing facility, a separate structure for animals, rubbish pit and drying rack for dishes.

We also implement the Community Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) approach with each of our village partners. This aims to improve the sanitation and hygiene practices and behaviors of a village. During these sessions, village leaders naturally emerge and push the community to realize that the current practices of individual households – particularly the practice of open defecation– are not only unhealthy but affect the entire village. CLTS facilitates a process in which community members realize the negative consequences of their current water, sanitation and hygiene behaviors and are inspired to take action. Group interactions are frequent motivators for individual households to build latrines, use the latrines and demand that other households do the same.

Project Updates


08/31/2019: Kimigi Kyamatama Community Well Complete!

Water is now flowing from a new hand-dug well in Kimigi Kyamatama, Uganda. People are thrilled about this development that has further unified their community. Community members also attended hygiene and sanitation planning sessions and financial training, and have learned a lot that will enable them to live healthier lives.

Hand-Dug Well

Construction of this new well was a big success!

There were no major delays during the construction process. The construction was done during the dry season when most of the community members were available since they were waiting for the rains to arrive before beginning the next planting season on their farms.

The process involved:
1) Community mobilization
2) Identification of the site
3) Hiring the contractor and technicians
4) Excavating until a viable water column was achieved
5) Lining the well with concrete liners and clay burnt bricks
6) Conducting recharge analysis to estimate the yield in litres/minute


7) Casting of the apron and drainage channel
8) Construction of the plaque stand
9) Installation of the Consallen hand pump.
10) Water quality analysis and commissioning

The team found a static water level at 8 meters and continued down to 11.7 meters for the final depth of the well.

For Jane Katusabe, the proximity of the well to her home and the ease with which she can fetch water will help her immensely. The 29-year-old mother of four children works as a housewife and farmer. She shared with our team:

“When I was just newly married in this community, water collection was one of the hardest things I faced. I had to lift a 20-liter container filled with water from the water point for more than 3 trips and often times with a baby on my back. Collecting water would make me feel very tired, but I had no option,” Mrs. Katusabe said.

Jane fetching water at the new well

“I am so happy this changed. I now can collect water [using] about 2 containers of water from 6:30 am-7:00 am before my garden work. I will return home from the garden at around 1:00 pm to prepare meals, clean dishes and sometimes wash clothes. Then I will return to the garden until 6:00 pm. Because the water point is near and accessible, I am encouraged to go and fetch 2 more containers during the day before I proceed with my other home chores,” she continued.

“Thank you for the facility. I am relieved from traveling long distances just to get water.”

Training

The community was mobilized through a series of meetings that sensitized them on the importance and purpose of saving. This included meetings to create a community profile (mapping physical environment and stakeholders in the community) and a participatory vulnerability capacity assessment exercise. In this exercise, community members mapped out their shared risks and opportunities, including the water point breaking down. The savings group training date was scheduled with the community.

A 1-day training was scheduled in 4 major parts: introduction, first saving meeting, first loan meeting, and share. Karungi Peace, Chair of the water user committee, helped mobilize attendees as well by compiling lists of training participants following the prior meetings.

The weather was sunny and enabled the community to congregate at Mrs. Peace’s home. This home is centrally located and spacious and shady. The weather was conducive and supportive of outdoor training. All 46 members of the group attended.

We worked with the community to establish both a Village Savings and Loan Association (VSLA) and a water user committee. The savings group set up a fund to provide small loans to each other and another fund that is used to pay for any repairs to the well if an issue arises. The group also agreed on a social fund that they contribute to each meeting to provide grants to fellow group members to help them with funeral expenses or catastrophes such as fire damage.

In collaboration with the community facilitator and natural leaders, like Karungi Peace, we trained households on critical hygiene and sanitation facilities to build. Our teams are monitoring the construction of these facilities, such as latrines, dishracks, refuse pits, handwashing facilities, and bath shelters.

We have trained local artisans on how to fabricate and sell sanitation products that allow for more hygienic and accessible latrines.

Our teams will provide follow-up training to support putting the savings group into practice. Saving procedures and loans were understood and good skills and knowledge were gained from the sessions. However, continuous coaching will be required in records management.

In other training, the community conceptually understood the sanitation and hygiene parts but will need support and monitoring to ensure follow-through in building new facilities and developing new habits.


The Water Project : uganda19281-pumping-the-well


07/18/2019: Kimigi Kyamatama Community Project Underway!

A severe clean water shortage in Kimigi Kyamatama Community drains people’s time, energy, and health. Thanks to your generosity, we’re working to install a clean water point and much more.

Get to know your community through the introduction and pictures we’ve posted, and read about this water, sanitation and hygiene project. We look forward to reaching out with more good news!


The Water Project : uganda19281-margerate-nabulia


Project Photos


Project Type

Dug Well and Hand Pump

Hand-dug wells are best suited for clay, sand, gravel and mixed soil ground formations. A large diameter well is dug by hand, and then lined with either bricks or concrete to prevent contamination and collapse of the well. Once a water table is hit, the well is capped and a hand-pump is installed – creating a complete and enclosed water system.


Contributors

Scandinavians for Life
Power of One - Gabby & Caitrin
Abraham Lincoln School's Act of Kindness