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The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -
The Water Project: Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko -

Project Status



Project Type:  Dug Well and Hand Pump

Program: Wells for Masindi / Jinga Uganda

Impact: 145 Served

Project Phase:  In Service - Oct 2014

Functionality Status:  Water Flowing - Needs Attention

Last Checkup: 06/25/2019

Project Features


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Community Profile

The report below from our partner in the field gives some great information on the construction of a new hand-dug well in the Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko community in Uganda:

Background:

Kiyogoma Hanga II Tuko is a densely populated sub village of about 40 households located in Kiyogoma village located in Kichwabugingo parish, Kiryandongo sub-county, Kiryandongo District. Onimu Gilbert 30, reflects that the cause of many water borne diseases is a result of the many open water sources spread all over the village which people find convenient to draw water unknowing of the dangers in collecting contaminated water.

The very active village chairman Atandwa Alex Oturupara of Kiyogoma has written another letter  to The Water Trust requesting for a water source to enable the rest of his  community to access clean water. In his letter, he assured us that the community was willing to make a contribution of all locally available materials like one trip of sand, a trip of hardcore, 2000 bricks within two weeks of acceptance of their request and the necessary manpower required to help in the excavation of the well and hosting the technician with accommodation and meals  during the construction process.

The Water Trust (TWT) will have an intensive program to provide access to clean water and sanitation in this village.  The community will participate in excavating and constructing the water source. In the meantime the aim is that all households own an improved latrine. Many households do not use a latrine but use the bush. Due to the practice of open defecation, faeces are spread all over the village and contaminate open water sources.  Our aim is to ensure that the community is able to live a healthy life, free of preventable waterborne diseases. We strive to work in partnership with the community to access safe clean water and improved sanitation.

Construction Progress:

June 30, 2014

Progress on this well continues to move along steadily as Bernard the technician and the community volunteers have excavated up to the water table. Next week we should be ready to transport the community contributed materials to the construction site.

June 4, 2014

This week local materials such as bricks, sand and hardcore were delivered to the construction site while Bernard the technician and the community volunteers excavated the well to reach a water table of 5ft.

July 11, 2014

Bernard the technician has encountered some difficulties in stabilizing the well with the ongoing rains.  So for now the construction works have been temporarily stopped awaiting one of the more experienced technicians in the group to come and lend assistance. We shall continue to monitor the situation.

July 18, 2014

This week both technicians Christopher and Bernard worked hard to stabilize this well but the soil formation remains too soft.  It has been proposed to have two concrete rings placed into the well and materials to cast these rings have already been delivered to the site. We continue to monitor this situation closely.

Sanitation and Hygiene

The main objectives of TWT’s Sanitation and Hygiene Program are the use of latrines and observing proper hygiene practices as these goals are inherently connected to the provision of clean water.  Open defecation, water storage in unclean containers and the absence of hand washing at critical times are all possible contaminates to the water supply at the household level.  TWT leverages this relationship, by requiring each participating village to achieve Open Defecation Free status (defined by one latrine per household), prior to the pump installation for a shallow hand dug well.  Using the immediate gratification of clean water as an impetus, TWT works toward sustainable, interdisciplinary WASH development.

The Water Trust’s social program includes the assignment of one Community Development Officer (CDO) per village.  The CDO encourages each household to build an ideal homestead that includes: a latrine with hand-washing facility, a rubbish pit, separate structure for animals and drying rack for dishes.

Community Led Total Sanitation

The Water Trust implements the Community Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) approach with each of our village partners.  TWT facilitates a CLTS session in which we aim to improve the sanitation and hygiene practices and behaviors of a village.  During these sessions, village leaders naturally emerge and push the community to realize that current practices of individual households – particularly open defecation– are not only unhealthy, but affect the entire village.  CLTS facilitates a process in which community members realize the negative consequences of their current water, sanitation and hygiene behaviors and are inspired to take action.  Group interactions are frequent motivators for individual households to: build latrines, use the latrines and demand that other households do the same.

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Project Photos


Project Type

Dug Well and Hand Pump

Hand-dug wells are best suited for clay, sand, gravel and mixed soil ground formations. A large diameter well is dug by hand, and then lined with either bricks or concrete to prevent contamination and collapse of the well. Once a water table is hit, the well is capped and a hand-pump is installed – creating a complete and enclosed water system.


Contributors

Project Sponsor - Troy and Brittany Johnson