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The Water Project: Kinuuma Community -
The Water Project: Kinuuma Community -
The Water Project: Kinuuma Community -
The Water Project: Kinuuma Community -
The Water Project: Kinuuma Community -
The Water Project: Kinuuma Community -
The Water Project: Kinuuma Community -
The Water Project: Kinuuma Community -
The Water Project: Kinuuma Community -
The Water Project: Kinuuma Community -
The Water Project: Kinuuma Community -
The Water Project: Kinuuma Community -
The Water Project: Kinuuma Community -
The Water Project: Kinuuma Community -
The Water Project: Kinuuma Community -
The Water Project: Kinuuma Community -
The Water Project: Kinuuma Community -
The Water Project: Kinuuma Community -
The Water Project: Kinuuma Community -
The Water Project: Kinuuma Community -
The Water Project: Kinuuma Community -
The Water Project: Kinuuma Community -
The Water Project: Kinuuma Community -
The Water Project: Kinuuma Community -
The Water Project: Kinuuma Community -
The Water Project: Kinuuma Community -
The Water Project: Kinuuma Community -
The Water Project: Kinuuma Community -
The Water Project: Kinuuma Community -

Project Status



Project Type:  Dug Well and Hand Pump

Regional Program: Western Uganda WaSH Program

Impact: 270 Served

Project Phase:  In Service - Jan 2017

Functionality Status:  Functional

Last Checkup: 09/16/2019

Project Features


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Community Profile

Kinuuma Community is located in Masindi County of Uganda. It’s one and a half kilometers away from the busy Masindi-Kampala Highway. GPS coordinates are estimates during the early stages of this project. We also estimate there to be at least 45 households who rely on surface water here.

People here either practice farming, business, or a mix of both. The farmers wake up as early as 6M to go tend to their tomatoes and bananas. This produce is sold at Kwatamwana Market every Monday, or is brought all the way to Masindi Town. Other adults go to the trading center to run retail stalls.

As the sun begins to set, people make their way back to their household gardens to work for a bit. After gardening and dinner, many men meet in the trading center for socializing and drinks. Women tend to stay home to prepare their families for the following day.

There is a great spirit of teamwork in Kinuuma Community, with people gathering around those who need support.

Water Situation

Water is fetched from the closest water source, located about one kilometer away from the center of the community. This surface water is swampy and highly contaminated. Unfortunately, community members have no other option; the water must be used for drinking, cooking, cleaning, and all other domestic needs.

Locals bring plastic jerrycans to dunk and fill at the swamp. Children often just carry a cup to get a quick drink. Before dunking a container in the water, algae must be pushed aside.

Waterborne disease is an issue, especially for the children. There are constant complaints of stomach pain accompanied with diarrhea.

Sanitation Situation

Under half of households in Kinuuma have their own pit latrine, which means several families must either share their facilities or use the privacy of bushes. With the attraction of flies and rainy weather, this human waste is spread throughout the village.

We met Mr. Geofrey Kalibagwa, a local farmer who acknowledges that open defecation is an issue in his village. He stresses that “the issue of low latrine coverage in the community is going to be handled on a serious note so as to fight diseases.”

Discussions about sanitation have already begun. As seen in a picture under “See Photos & Video,” a local family built a dish rack and then shared that information with their neighbors.

Plans: Hygiene and Sanitation Training

The main objectives are the use of latrines and observing proper hygiene practices, since these goals are inherently connected to the provision of clean water. Open defecation, water storage in unclean containers and the absence of hand-washing are all possible contaminants of a household water supply. Each participating village must achieve Open Defecation Free status (defined by one latrine per household), prior to the pump installation for a shallow hand-dug well.

This social program includes the assignment of one Community Development Officer (CDO) to each village. The CDO encourages each household to build an ideal homestead that includes: a latrine, hand-washing facility, a separate structure for animals, rubbish pit and drying rack for dishes.

We also implement the Community Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) approach with each of our village partners. This aims to improve the sanitation and hygiene practices and behaviors of a village. During these sessions, village leaders naturally emerge and push the community to realize that current practices of individual households – particularly the practice of open defecation– are not only unhealthy, but affect the entire village. CLTS facilitates a process in which community members realize the negative consequences of their current water, sanitation and hygiene behaviors and are inspired to take action. Group interactions are frequent motivators for individual households to: build latrines, use the latrines and demand that other households do the same.

Plans: Hand-Dug Well

The community will participate in excavating and constructing the water source. In the meantime the aim is that all households own an improved latrine. When there is open defecation, feces spread all over the village, which leads to waterborne diseases and contamination of groundwater and surface water. Our aim is that the community is able to live a healthy life free of preventable diseases. We endeavor that at the end of our presence in the community, people will have both access to sustainable, clean water and access to sanitation. We have now organized families to form digging groups for latrine construction, and empowered them with tools to use.

Actual well construction will take four to six weeks if there are no challenges. The well will be lined with bricks and sealing clay, and finished with a Consallen pump.

Thank You for partnering with us to get clean water to the people living in Kinuuma Community!

Project Updates


12/20/2017: A Year Later: Kinuuma Community

A year ago, generous donors helped install a well with Kinuuma Community in Uganda. Because of these gifts and contributions from our monthly donors, partners can visit project sites throughout the year, strengthening relationships with communities and evaluating the actual water project. These consistent visits allow us to learn vital lessons and hear amazing stories – we’re excited to share this one from our partner Geoffrey Kusemererwa with you.


The Water Project : 1-6072-yar


Project Photos


Project Type

Dug Well and Hand Pump

Hand-dug wells are best suited for clay, sand, gravel and mixed soil ground formations. A large diameter well is dug by hand, and then lined with either bricks or concrete to prevent contamination and collapse of the well. Once a water table is hit, the well is capped and a hand-pump is installed – creating a complete and enclosed water system.


A Year Later: Kinuuma Community

December, 2017

I do not need to come back from school worried of going to fetch water at night because the water point is right here. Besides, the water is clean so diseases like typhoid that used to disturb us so often are not common anymore.

Keeping The Water Promise

There's an incredible community of monthly donors who have come alongside you in supporting clean water in Kinuuma Community.

This giving community supports ongoing sustainability programs that help Kinuuma Community maintain access to safe, reliable water. Together, they keep The Water Promise.

We’re confident you'll love joining this world-changing group committed to sustainability!

Give Monthly

A year ago, generous donors helped install a well with Kinuuma Community in Uganda. Because of these gifts and contributions from our monthly donors, partners can visit project sites throughout the year, strengthening relationships with communities and evaluating the actual water project. These consistent visits allow us to learn vital lessons and hear amazing stories – we’re excited to share this one from our partner Geoffrey Kusemererwa with you.


Kinuuma Village, with a catchment population of 42 households became Open Defecation Free (ODF) with 100% latrine coverage on January 17, 2017. The latrine construction was accompanied by the construction of other sanitary facilities like kitchens, bath shelters, and drying racks. These facilities have helped to further improve the sanitation of this community, hence improving the health of its people.

Village Elder Francis Magezi Kusiima’s wife at their household.

The construction of a well in this community has helped reduce the time community members used to spend while walking long distances in search of clean, safe drinking water.

Village Elder Magezi

Geoffrey met with the village elder, Francis Kusiima at the well to talk about how life has changed over the past year. He said “there have been continued follow-ups to ensure every household improves their sanitation with latrines, drying racks, and rubbish pits. We were also taught how to manage and maintain our water point well. For every household that uses this water point, they contribute 1,000 shillings each month meant for repairs and maintenance of the water point. About 35 of the 42 households pay this fee, and we currently have 75,000 shillings saved with clear records and accountability.”

Emmanuel and a friend pumping clean water at the well.

17-year-old Emmanuel Katwesige came by to fetch water while we were there. He said, “The distance to the water point has decreased. This is because it is near our homes, meaning that a lot of time is saved, which gives me a chance to reach school on time. I do not need to come back from school worried of going to fetch water at night because the water point is right here. Besides, the water is clean so diseases like typhoid that used to disturb us so often are not common anymore.”

This community is working hard to ensure that they take good care of their water point. They’ve constructed a fence and cleared all the bushes. Coupled with the great management, we’re sure that this well will continue to serve the community with clean water.


The Water Project and our partners are committed to consistent monitoring of each water source. Our monitoring and evaluation program, made possible by monthly donors, allows us to visit communities up to 4 times a year. Read more about our program and how you can help.


Navigating through intense dry spells, performing preventative maintenance, conducting quality repairs when needed and continuing to assist community leaders to manage water points are all normal parts of keeping projects sustainable. The Water Promise community supports ongoing sustainability programs that help Kinuuma Community maintain access to safe, reliable water.

We’d love for you to join this world-changing group committed to sustainability.

The most impactful way to continue your support of Kinuuma Community – and hundreds of other places just like this – is by joining our community of monthly givers.

Your monthly giving will help provide clean water, every month... keeping The Water Promise!

Give Monthly