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The Water Project: Ekarakaveni II-Androsi Community -
The Water Project: Ekarakaveni II-Androsi Community -
The Water Project: Ekarakaveni II-Androsi Community -
The Water Project: Ekarakaveni II-Androsi Community -
The Water Project: Ekarakaveni II-Androsi Community -
The Water Project: Ekarakaveni II-Androsi Community -
The Water Project: Ekarakaveni II-Androsi Community -
The Water Project: Ekarakaveni II-Androsi Community -
The Water Project: Ekarakaveni II-Androsi Community -
The Water Project: Ekarakaveni II-Androsi Community -
The Water Project: Ekarakaveni II-Androsi Community -
The Water Project: Ekarakaveni II-Androsi Community -
The Water Project: Ekarakaveni II-Androsi Community -
The Water Project: Ekarakaveni II-Androsi Community -
The Water Project: Ekarakaveni II-Androsi Community -
The Water Project: Ekarakaveni II-Androsi Community -
The Water Project: Ekarakaveni II-Androsi Community -
The Water Project: Ekarakaveni II-Androsi Community -
The Water Project: Ekarakaveni II-Androsi Community -
The Water Project: Ekarakaveni II-Androsi Community -
The Water Project: Ekarakaveni II-Androsi Community -
The Water Project: Ekarakaveni II-Androsi Community -

Project Status



Project Type:  Protected Spring

Regional Program: Western Uganda WaSH Program

Impact: 300 Served

Project Phase:  In Service - Mar 2017

Functionality Status:  Functional

Last Checkup: 08/19/2019

Project Features


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Community Profile

This spring protection system will be installed in Ekarakaveni, Uganda. At this stage of the project, GPS coordinates are a rough estimate.

Ekarakaveni is home to an estimated 60 households that add up to a population of 300, all who will soon benefit from hygiene and sanitation training and clean water.

A normal day starts at 6AM, when farmers wake up to beat the hot Ugandan sun. By noontime at lunch, it is much too hot to continue working in the fields. Most farmers specialize in sugarcane, since it can be sold to the local Kinyara Sugar Factory at a decent price. They also grow crops such as cassava, maize, and beans to feed their families.

Women are in charge of getting home first to prepare lunch. For the rest of the afternoon, women are focused on getting household chores done for their families (washing clothes and dishes or sweeping floors). Some of the men head over to the trading center to keep earning money other ways: repairing bicycles, radios, or selling extra crops.

In the evening, women sometimes join their husbands at the trading center to continue selling crops. When this wraps up, the adults start to relax and socialize with their friends. As for the children, most are in school for the majority of the day. Otherwise, they help their parents on the farm and at home.

Water Situation

These 300 people rely on a nearby water source, an unprotected spring that is reliable even through the driest weather. A log is suspended over the deepest part of the spring so that women and children can balance as they fill their water containers.

This water sits open in a field, subject to a myriad of different contaminants. Animals sate their thirst, children play and  bathe at the spring, and rainwater washes things like feces and fertilizers into the water. Families are subject to waterborne disease, with children and the elderly often suffering from diarrhea.

Sanitation Situation

A handful of households here do not have their own latrines. Instead, families either share with their neighbor or practice open defecation. As we begin construction, we will encourage and help each family have their own latrine. With the proper facilities, water will be clean and safe not only at the water source, but at home too.

Dirty water doesn’t only result in diarrhea, typhoid, and cholera, but affects the skin too. Mr. Okech Jackson is one of the many who must rely on water from the spring. He told us that “people within this area suffer from scabies because of bathing in dirty water.”

Plans: Hygiene and Sanitation Training

Training’s main objectives are the use of latrines and observing proper hygiene practices, since these goals are inherently connected to the provision of clean water. Open defecation, water storage in unclean containers and the absence of hand-washing are all possible contaminants of a household water supply. Each participating village must achieve Open Defecation Free status (defined by one latrine per household), prior to the project installation.

This social program includes the assignment of one Community Development Officer (CDO) to each village. The CDO encourages each household to build an ideal homestead that includes: a latrine, hand-washing facility, a separate structure for animals, rubbish pit and drying rack for dishes.

We also implement the Community Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) approach with each of our village partners. This aims to improve the sanitation and hygiene practices and behaviors of a village. During these sessions, village leaders naturally emerge and push the community to realize that current practices of individual households – particularly the practice of open defecation– are not only unhealthy, but affect the entire village. CLTS facilitates a process in which community members realize the negative consequences of their current water, sanitation and hygiene behaviors and are inspired to take action. Group interactions are frequent motivators for individual households to: build latrines, use the latrines and demand that other households do the same.

Plans: Spring Protection

Over continued visits to the community, the viability of a hand-dug well diminished. We just couldn’t find a good construction site for a well that would yield safe, clean water. The terrain here is very hilly; a great place for flowing springs but a difficult place to dig a well.

Considering the convenience, reliability, and long history of this spring, the community has decided to unite with us to build a spring protection system for their current source. Once construction is completed, the spring will begin yielding clean drinking water.

Locals have already begun to gather the materials necessary for construction, such as sand and stone. There’s a lot of work to be done: They will have to help our team clear the land around the spring, diverge the water, build a catchment area with walls allowing for discharge pipes and steps in and out, and dig drainage. Local families will host our spring protection artisans while they begin the sanitation improvements needed for a successful partnership. We all look forward to making these improvements together!

We're just getting started, check back soon!


Project Photos


Project Type

Protected Spring

In many communities, natural springs exist as water flows from cracks in rocky ground or the side of a hill.  Springs provide reliable water but that doesn’t mean safe. When left open they become contaminated by surface contamination, animal and human waste and rain runoff. The solution is to protect the source. First, you excavate around the exact source area of the spring. Then, you build a protective reservoir for water flow, which pours through a reinforced pipe in a concrete headwall to a paved collection area. Safe water typically flows year-round and there is very limited ongoing maintenance needed!


A Year Later: Ekarakaveni II-Androsi Community

December, 2017

The old open water source definitely caused diseases like running stomachs… But we never experience such difficulties these days since now we have a protected spring. The water is very clear throughout the year and it does not smell. It is safe for drinking.

Keeping The Water Promise

There's an incredible community of monthly donors who have come alongside you in supporting clean water in Ekarakaveni II-Androsi Community.

This giving community supports ongoing sustainability programs that help Ekarakaveni II-Androsi Community maintain access to safe, reliable water. Together, they keep The Water Promise.

We’re confident you'll love joining this world-changing group committed to sustainability!

Give Monthly

A year ago, generous donors helped install a well with Ekarakaveni II-Androsi Community in Uganda. Because of these gifts and contributions from our monthly donors, partners can visit project sites throughout the year, strengthening relationships with communities and evaluating the actual water project. These consistent visits allow us to learn vital lessons and hear amazing stories – we’re excited to share this one from our partners, Geoffrey Kusemererwa and Stephen Kwikiriza with you.


A baseline survey was conducted in Ekarakaveni II on November 3, 2016 by Stephen. He found that there are 31 households here. However, of the 31 households only 17 had proper latrines. The rest were either sharing a latrine or practicing Open Defecation (OD). Training as held a week later, with an action plan to eliminate open defecation by December 1, 2017. We are glad to report that through the help of the local leader, local council, and health team, we were able to meet this target.

Geofrey fetching water at the spring.

Stephen met Geofrey Osiba at the spring to talk about the changes he’s witnessed throughout the last year. He said that “the old open water source definitely caused diseases like running stomachs… But we never experience such difficulties these days since now we have a protected spring. The water is very clear throughout the year and it does not smell. It is safe for drinking. We were taught that cleanliness starts at the home and goes to the water point. Do not fetch water in dirty containers since it will contaminants the water that you have fetched…”

Julius Munguriech

Julius Munguriech arrived to fetch water at the spring. “We trust the water we drink these days will not harm us with any diseases like the previous one did,” he said. He and the rest of the community are so grateful for the clean water they have, and more so for the resulting good health.


The Water Project and our partners are committed to consistent monitoring of each water source. Our monitoring and evaluation program, made possible by monthly donors, allows us to visit communities up to 4 times a year. Read more about our program and how you can help.


Navigating through intense dry spells, performing preventative maintenance, conducting quality repairs when needed and continuing to assist community leaders to manage water points are all normal parts of keeping projects sustainable. The Water Promise community supports ongoing sustainability programs that help Ekarakaveni II-Androsi Community maintain access to safe, reliable water.

We’d love for you to join this world-changing group committed to sustainability.

The most impactful way to continue your support of Ekarakaveni II-Androsi Community – and hundreds of other places just like this – is by joining our community of monthly givers.

Your monthly giving will help provide clean water, every month... keeping The Water Promise!

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