Loading images...
The Water Project: Ngitini Community C -  Water Flowing
The Water Project: Ngitini Community C -  Water Flowing
The Water Project: Ngitini Community C -  Water Flowing
The Water Project: Ngitini Community C -  Water Flowing
The Water Project: Ngitini Community C -  Water Flowing
The Water Project: Ngitini Community C -  Water Flowing
The Water Project: Ngitini Community C -  Well Plaque
The Water Project: Ngitini Community C -  Well Progress
The Water Project: Ngitini Community C -  Well Progress
The Water Project: Ngitini Community C -  Well Progress
The Water Project: Ngitini Community C -  Well Progress
The Water Project: Ngitini Community C -  Well Construction
The Water Project: Ngitini Community C -  Well Construction
The Water Project: Ngitini Community C -  Well Construction
The Water Project: Ngitini Community C -  Well Construction
The Water Project: Ngitini Community C -  Excavation
The Water Project: Ngitini Community C -  Excavation
The Water Project: Ngitini Community C -  Mr Mbuthu
The Water Project: Ngitini Community C -  Nutrition Training
The Water Project: Ngitini Community C -  Training
The Water Project: Ngitini Community C -  Training
The Water Project: Ngitini Community C -  Cooking
The Water Project: Ngitini Community C -  Dishes Drying
The Water Project: Ngitini Community C -  Latrines
The Water Project: Ngitini Community C -  Clothes Hanging To Dry
The Water Project: Ngitini Community C -  Watermelons
The Water Project: Ngitini Community C -  The Wambua Family
The Water Project: Ngitini Community C -  Water Collection And Storage Containers
The Water Project: Ngitini Community C -  Carrying Water
The Water Project: Ngitini Community C -  Carrying Containers To Collect Water
The Water Project: Ngitini Community C -  Collecting Water From Scoop Hole
The Water Project: Ngitini Community C -  Scoop Hole

Project Status



Project Type:  Dug Well and Hand Pump

Regional Program: Southeastern Kenya WaSH Program

Impact: 500 Served

Project Phase:  Installed - Feb 2019

Functionality Status:  Functional

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



Many people in Ngitini Community have to walk long distances to collect water and traverse steep and rocky terrain just to reach the source. It is exhausting and dangerous to carry heavy cans of water along that path.

All that effort is to fetch water from a scoop hole that is dirty, untreated and unprotected. It poses a high risk of contracting diseases waterborne such as typhoid, cholera, or diarrhea.

“The water we get from these scoop holes is very little, especially during the dry seasons. It is dirty and we have to spend a lot of time and money to make it safe for consumption,” Mr. Daniel Kyalo, a local farmer, said.

It is very dangerous to consume such water because the water is also used for livestock and other domestic animals. These scoop holes dry up when there are no rains. Some people will dig deeper holes to try and find water, but most will look to other sources for water.

As a result, people turn to the nearby river for collecting water – a source that is also open to contamination and poses a risk to young people who can fall in. The water used for drinking is often untreated in this community, too.

“It is very expensive to treat since the water is salty; washing clothes is usually very exhausting because the soap does not lather,” Mr. Kyalo said.

Kinyenyoni Self-Help Group heard about our work to build dams and new wells from other communities and decided to contact us through a field officer. We learned about their water problems and that fewer than half of households have latrines.

The latrines we observed are rarely cleaned due to the water scarcity. As a result, the latrines have a foul smell and are in generally poor shape. Handwashing is also infrequent as a result of the restricted access to water.

“Our children suffer the most because they usually come home from school very thirsty and that’s the water they will drink because they have no option,” Mr. Kyalo said.

“They fall sick very easily.”

Ngitini Village is a serene rural area that is fairly vegetative, as a result of reforestation. It is fairly flat with very few hills around.

Most of the natural vegetation has been cleared to pave way for agriculture. The area boasts of red fertile soil. The households of the area are made of fairly permanent red bricks and are roofed by iron sheets. Most of the families that we visited had a connection to the main electricity grid.

On an average day for the community members, the women wake up at 6am, go to fetch water, and then prepare breakfast for the family as the children prepare for school.

The men go to the farm to get grass for the livestock and also prepare to run errands. Common tasks include: farming, taking farm products to the market, feeding the livestock, and more.

Most of the families earn their income through farming. For instance, one of the families that we visited were farmers and they had harvested a lot of watermelons.

During the day, the woman does the laundry, tidies up the house, washes utensils and prepares lunch as well as supper for the family.

What we plan to do about it:

Our main entry point into Ngitini Community has been the Kinyenyoni Self-Help Group, which is comprised of farming households that are working together to address water and food scarcity in their region. These members will be our hands and feet in both constructing water projects and spreading the message of good hygiene and sanitation to everyone.

This is the group’s second sand dam and hand-dug well system for 2018. The system installed earlier in the year is currently maturing, and has already brought water closer to several families.

Training

We train self-help group members and their communities on hygiene and sanitation practices. We want to ensure that community members are practicing the day to day habits we are not able to observe during household visits. Food hygiene, water hygiene and treatment, personal hygiene and handwashing are all focuses during training.

 

Hand-Dug Well

This particular hand-dug well is being built adjacent to this group’s ongoing sand dam project (click here to see), which will supply clean drinking water once it rains. We have supplied the group with the tools needed for excavation. With the guidance of our artisans and mechanics, the excavated well will be cased, sealed with a well pad, and then finished with a new AfriDev pump.

Excavation takes a month or more on average, depending on the nature of the rock beneath. Construction of the well lining and installation of the pump takes 12 days maximum. The well will be lined with a concrete wall including perforations so that once it rains, water will filter in from the sand dam.

This well will be located in Ngitini Village and will bring clean water closer to families having to walk long distances for their water.

Project Updates


02/26/2019: Ngitini Community Hand-Dug Well Complete

Ngitini Community, Kenya now has a new water source thanks to your donation. A hand-dug well was constructed adjacent to a sand dam. Once it rains, the dam will build up sand that both stores and naturally filters water available at the hand-dug well. Community members also attended hygiene and sanitation training, and plan to share what they learned with their families and neighbors.

Hand-Dug Well

“We are happy to have completed this project,” said Mr. Kyalo.

“It was not easy with the numerous challenges we faced during the construction, but members stood their ground and completed this important project. The project will be instrumental towards increased water access to our people and improving on levels of hygiene and sanitation. We are a joy-filled community after the hard work!”

The Process:

We delivered the experts and materials, but the community helped get an extraordinary amount of work done. They collected local materials to supplement the project, including sand and water.

A seven feet in diameter hole is excavated up to a recommended depth of 25 feet. (Most hand-dug wells don’t reach that depth due to the existence of hard rocks between 10-18 ft.). The diameter then shrinks to five feet when construction of the hand-dug well lining is completed. This lining is made of brick and mortar with perforations to allow for water to seep through.

Once the construction of the lining is level with the top of the dam, a precast concrete slab is built on top and joined to the wall using mortar. Four bolts for the hand-pump are fixed on the slab during casting. The concrete needs to dry over the course of two weeks before the pump is installed.

The mechanics arrive to install the pump as community members watch, learning how to manage simple maintenance tasks for themselves.

The well is then given another few days after installing the pump to allow the joints to completely dry.

The pump was installed level with the top of the sand dam because as the dam matures, sand will amass until it reaches the top of the platform. Once it rains, this sand behind the dam wall will store the water to be accessed through this hand-dug well.

In fact, the sand dam has already stored water that’s currently being enjoyed by the community!

Training Review and New Knowledge

Paulson Mukonzi is the field officer for this group, and worked closely with them to agree on a training date. The self-help group secretary carried the plans to the rest of the group members as they were working on their sand dam. They agreed to meet at the homestead of a member, Robert Mbaluka, where they normally gather for group meetings.

Participants chose to continue a discussion on the different illnesses they most often encounter in their village. They drew out a calendar where they listed illnesses and the season during which they are most common. With that organization, people were able to brainstorm factors causing those illnesses.

They also wanted to review water treatment methods such as solar disinfection and the use of moringa seeds. This was an important session because we had been discovering that group members were not putting these methods into place even though they learned about them in past training sessions.

Training overview

We introduced more information about a balanced diet during the last session, when group members measured their BMI and we discussed how this should inform food intake.

Mr. Mbuthu volunteered to demonstrate how one would measure their BMI.

“This training will really help us change our lives because if we follow the content that has been trained, like for instance water treatment, it will help us prevent water-related diseases. Watching our diet will also help us prevent lifestyle diseases and thus live a healthy life. From the seasonal calendar, we have understood different diseases, what causes them, and how we can prevent them,” said Mr. Mbuthu.

“This knowledge is very crucial in our lives because it’s not only important to us who have been trained, but also to the entire community.”


The Water Project : 21-kenya18227-water-flowing


01/10/2019: Ngitini Community Hand-Dug Well Project Underway

A severe clean water shortage in Ngitini Community still affects hundreds of people. Thanks to your generosity, we’re working to install a nearby water system and much more.

Get to know this community through the introduction and pictures we’ve posted, and read about this water, sanitation and hygiene project. We look forward to reaching out with more good news!


The Water Project : kenya18187-collecting-water-from-scoop-hole


Project Photos


Project Type

Dug Well and Hand Pump

Hand-dug wells are best suited for clay, sand, gravel and mixed soil ground formations. A large diameter well is dug by hand, and then lined with either bricks or concrete to prevent contamination and collapse of the well. Once a water table is hit, the well is capped and a hand-pump is installed – creating a complete and enclosed water system.



Contributors

Project Sponsor - Pineapple Fund