Proposed Project

Sand Dam

Seasonal streams (and the sand they carry) are trapped by dams, replenishing the water table and allowing for adjacent hand-dug wells. Almost completely led by community-supplied sweat and materials, and under the supervision of engineers, dams are strategically placed within those dry river-beds. The next time it rains, flood-waters are trapped.

With a sand dam, this trapped sand begins to hold millions of gallons of rainwater. Soon enough, sand reaches the top of the dam, allowing water to continue downstream – where it meets the next dam. The result? A regional water table is restored.

Project Type:  Sand Dam

Regional Program: Southeastern Kenya WaSH Program

Project Phase:  Funded - Project Initiated
Estimated Install Date (?):  03/01/2019

Project Features


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Program Plans

Southeastern Kenya WaSH Program


Project Type: Sand Dam
Project type subject to change prior to completion based on community needs and geographical and hydro-geological limitations.


The Water Project’s WaSH program in Southeast Kenya aims to restore water access for communities living in a semi-arid environment through the construction of sand dams, shallow hand dug wells, and 104,000 liter rainwater catchment systems.  Explore projects in this region to learn about (how you can be involved in) innovative farming, education, hygiene and sanitation training, and reliable access to clean drinking water.


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Project Type

Sand Dam

Seasonal streams (and the sand they carry) are trapped by dams, replenishing the water table and allowing for adjacent hand-dug wells. Almost completely led by community-supplied sweat and materials, and under the supervision of engineers, dams are strategically placed within those dry river-beds. The next time it rains, flood-waters are trapped.

With a sand dam, this trapped sand begins to hold millions of gallons of rainwater. Soon enough, sand reaches the top of the dam, allowing water to continue downstream – where it meets the next dam. The result? A regional water table is restored.



Contributors

Project Sponsor - Pineapple Fund