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The Water Project: Kwa Mutunga New Well Project -
The Water Project: Kwa Mutunga New Well Project -
The Water Project: Kwa Mutunga New Well Project -
The Water Project: Kwa Mutunga New Well Project -
The Water Project: Kwa Mutunga New Well Project -
The Water Project: Kwa Mutunga New Well Project -
The Water Project: Kwa Mutunga New Well Project -
The Water Project: Kwa Mutunga New Well Project -
The Water Project: Kwa Mutunga New Well Project -
The Water Project: Kwa Mutunga New Well Project -
The Water Project: Kwa Mutunga New Well Project -
The Water Project: Kwa Mutunga New Well Project -
The Water Project: Kwa Mutunga New Well Project -
The Water Project: Kwa Mutunga New Well Project -
The Water Project: Kwa Mutunga New Well Project -
The Water Project: Kwa Mutunga New Well Project -
The Water Project: Kwa Mutunga New Well Project -
The Water Project: Kwa Mutunga New Well Project -
The Water Project: Kwa Mutunga New Well Project -
The Water Project: Kwa Mutunga New Well Project -
The Water Project: Kwa Mutunga New Well Project -
The Water Project: Kwa Mutunga New Well Project -
The Water Project: Kwa Mutunga New Well Project -
The Water Project: Kwa Mutunga New Well Project -
The Water Project: Kwa Mutunga New Well Project -
The Water Project: Kwa Mutunga New Well Project -
The Water Project: Kwa Mutunga New Well Project -
The Water Project: Kwa Mutunga New Well Project -
The Water Project: Kwa Mutunga New Well Project -
The Water Project: Kwa Mutunga New Well Project -
The Water Project: Kwa Mutunga New Well Project -
The Water Project: Kwa Mutunga New Well Project -
The Water Project: Kwa Mutunga New Well Project -
The Water Project: Kwa Mutunga New Well Project -
The Water Project: Kwa Mutunga New Well Project -
The Water Project: Kwa Mutunga New Well Project -
The Water Project: Kwa Mutunga New Well Project -
The Water Project: Kwa Mutunga New Well Project -
The Water Project: Kwa Mutunga New Well Project -
The Water Project: Kwa Mutunga New Well Project -
The Water Project: Kwa Mutunga New Well Project -
The Water Project: Kwa Mutunga New Well Project -

Project Status



Project Type:  Dug Well and Hand Pump

Regional Program: Southeastern Kenya WaSH Program

Impact: 500 Served

Project Phase:  In Service - Mar 2017

Functionality Status:  Functional

Last Checkup: 11/19/2019

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



Community Profile

This project is a part of our shared program with Africa Sand Dam Foundation. Our team is pleased to directly share the below report (edited for clarity, as needed).

Welcome to the Community

The Kwa Mutunga Self-Help Group is located in Ngomano, Makueni County. Their community is located in one of the driest parts of the county, on land that was initially used for a ranch. Because of a rapidly changing climate, their water sources have since dried up. Food shortage and water scarcity here has affected thousands of households. They haven’t seen rain in the last years, further burdening the already poor communities whose income is solely dependent on farming and livestock.

Because of these dire circumstances, the people of Maukeni County have been the recipients of many different water projects from different organizations. However, many of these projects now sit unused. Boreholes have dried up, and pumps have sat unrepaired. Three boreholes were drilled, but only one works now and then. Unfortunately, the well that functions is the one farthest away from community members. Thus, it still takes many women and children an average of four to five hours each day to fetch enough water for their families.

This area is home to 800 people, and we estimate that 500 people will benefit from this new water source. (Editor’s Note: While this many people may have access on any given day, realistically a single water source can only support a population of 350-500 people.  This community would be a good candidate for a second project in the future so adequate water is available. To learn more, click here.)

Water Situation

People in this area have one borehole, some unprotected wells, and groundwater for their water sources. The population here is large and expansive. Since such a large population relies on only a few water points, the lines to fetch water are extremely long. Moreover, water from the existing wells is sold at an average of five shillings per container. Many farmers here cannot afford that price to water their large amount of cattle, and sometimes the goats go for days without water. This leads to huge economic losses for farmers. Children go for days without being able to take a bath. Their school uniforms are filthy.

A majority of families will choose to fetch their water from the riverbed, where it’s free. Different scoop holes will be dug according to use. Some are set aside for cattle, and the others for human consumption. People here don’t care much about having good quality water for their animals or household use, but make sure to reserve the cleanest-looking water for drinking.

Once delivered home, water is also kept in separate containers based on use. Drinking water is stored in covered clay pots up off the ground, and water for cleaning and for animals is kept on the ground in plastic jerrycans.

We met Rhoda Wambua, a mother and a farmer who has suffered from these conditions. Her picture can be seen under the “See Photos & Video” tab. She told us, “We have suffered because of lack of clean drinking water. We are drinking water which is colored and smelly, and many are afraid of getting sick from continued use of such water.”

Sanitation Situation

This is the second year we’ve worked with the Kwa Mutunga Self-Help Group, so they’ve had time to implement improvements. Every single household here has a pit latrine, and almost every family has a room dedicated for personal hygiene. More than half of homes have hand-washing stations either outside of the latrine or kitchen.

Plans: Hygiene and Sanitation Review

The group will meet for two days to review what they’ve learned about hygiene and sanitation. After visiting many of their homes in person, we decided to focus on hand-washing with them again. Last year during training, the group made an action plan that included the construction of hand-washing stations. The group cannot reach that goal until every single home has a place to wash hands.

Plans: New Well

We will work with the Kwa Mutunga Self-Help Group for four more years to achieve their goal of building six new water points. This hand-dug well will be their second, and is being constructed adjacent to their second sand dam (click here to see the sand dam project). The construction process will begin with group members gathering the needed materials, such as sand, stones, and water. They will also help the artisan excavate the hole for the well. Then, the well pad will be casted and the new AfriDev pump installed.

One of the reasons so many of the boreholes in this area failed is because there was no strong management in place. When a well broke down, nobody felt responsible to fix it. One of our goals with this self-help group is to raise up a strong water user committee that will oversee and maintain this new hand-dug well. Whenever there’s an issue, the committee will have the skills to deal with it. If a repair is out of their hands, they will have our contact information to trigger a visit from one of our mechanics.

Project Updates


12/20/2017: A Year Later: Kwa Mutunga Hand-Dug Well

A year ago, generous donors helped build a hand-dug well for the Kwa Mutunga Self-Help Group in Kenya. Because of these gifts and our monthly donors, partners are able to visit project sites throughout the year, strengthening relationships with communities and evaluating the actual water project. These consistent visits allow us to learn vital lessons and hear amazing stories – we’re excited to share this one from our partners Titus Mbithi and Mutheu Mutune with you.


The Water Project : 4471-yar-2


Project Photos


Project Type

Dug Well and Hand Pump

Hand-dug wells are best suited for clay, sand, gravel and mixed soil ground formations. A large diameter well is dug by hand, and then lined with either bricks or concrete to prevent contamination and collapse of the well. Once a water table is hit, the well is capped and a hand-pump is installed – creating a complete and enclosed water system.


A Year Later: Kwa Mutunga Hand-Dug Well

December, 2017

My personal hygiene has improved and waterborne diseases like amoeba and typhoid have decreased since we drink treated water after the training my parents received. I have known how to store our drinking water and treat it before drinking. My school performance has increased because I don’t waste a lot of time going to fetch water.

Keeping The Water Promise

There's an incredible community of monthly donors who have come alongside you in supporting clean water in Kwa Mutunga New Well Project.

This giving community supports ongoing sustainability programs that help Kwa Mutunga New Well Project maintain access to safe, reliable water. Together, they keep The Water Promise.

We’re confident you'll love joining this world-changing group committed to sustainability!

Give Monthly

A year ago, generous donors helped build a hand-dug well for the Kwa Mutunga Self-Help Group in Kenya. Because of these gifts and our monthly donors, partners are able to visit project sites throughout the year, strengthening relationships with communities and evaluating the actual water project. These consistent visits allow us to learn vital lessons and hear amazing stories – we’re excited to share this one from our partners Titus Mbithi and Mutheu Mutune with you.


People here used to have to travel to Kikuu River which is four hours one way. Now, people living in this area have their own hand-dug well that draws other people living as far as three kilometers away. The water is safe for drinking, which has particularly benefitted livestock – There used to be so little water available that livestock would die during the dry seasons.

People were trained on how to take care of their drinking water and since then, they have been seeing minimal cases of waterborne diseases. The project has now been supplying them with water throughout the year so that children are cleaner and the environment is greener.

Though there is a hand-dug well, people still use scoop holes in the riverbed to get water for cleaning and watering livestock.

We met self-help group member Scholastica Kyalo, who told us “The water from the well is soft, and cooking our traditional meal Githeri has been easy. We also cook for our children early enough for them to find food at home from school. This wasn’t the case before the project. They would sleep in late because of our late cooking… The water is safe for drinking, and the children carry drinking water to school… The environment has also changed, and we hope to see it changing the next few years. ”

Field Officer Mutheu Mutune with Mrs. Kyalo.

Mrs. Kyalo’s daughter, Ndungwa Kyalo, had similar things to say. “Before, washing my clothes was a nightmare because water from Kikuu River was very salty and the distance to water source has decreased compared to before when we could walk for long distances in search of water. I have been using this water to bathe and wash my clothes. My personal hygiene has improved and waterborne diseases like amoeba and typhoid have decreased since we drink treated water after the training my parents received. I have known how to store our drinking water and treat it before drinking. My school performance has increased because I don’t waste a lot of time going to fetch water. Instead, I use the time to do my homework. I use the water from the sand dam to water my vegetables such as onions, kales, and tomatoes which are very good.”

Interviews were held at the water point.

Our visit proved extremely valuable as we learned that this hand-dug well dries up on occasion. Water is still available in holes dug right by the sand dam but because of severe drought at the turn of the year, even those dried up for a few months. Ndungwa reports that without water at Kwa Mutunga’s sand dam, people either buy bottled water or make the long trip to Kikuu River. However, Mrs. Kyalo noted their young sand dam will continue to mature through more rainy seasons, building up sand and storing even more clean water which will make the environment greener and lives healthier. We will continue to work with this community to ensure clean drinking water in the future.


Most of our other southeastern Kenya projects are like this too; they are young systems that need time to mature in order to provide clean, reliable water throughout drought. We look forward to this happening here, and are excited to monitor the transformation!

The Water Project and our partners are committed to consistent monitoring of each water source. Our monitoring and evaluation program, made possible by monthly donors, allows us to visit communities up to four times a year. Read more about our program and how you can help.


Navigating through intense dry spells, performing preventative maintenance, conducting quality repairs when needed and continuing to assist community leaders to manage water points are all normal parts of keeping projects sustainable. The Water Promise community supports ongoing sustainability programs that help Kwa Mutunga New Well Project maintain access to safe, reliable water.

We’d love for you to join this world-changing group committed to sustainability.

The most impactful way to continue your support of Kwa Mutunga New Well Project – and hundreds of other places just like this – is by joining our community of monthly givers.

Your monthly giving will help provide clean water, every month... keeping The Water Promise!

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Contributors

Project Sponsor - Lisa and Adam Lawrence and family