Loading images...
The Water Project: Musunguu Community D -
The Water Project: Musunguu Community D -
The Water Project: Musunguu Community D -
The Water Project: Musunguu Community D -
The Water Project: Musunguu Community D -
The Water Project: Musunguu Community D -
The Water Project: Musunguu Community D -
The Water Project: Musunguu Community D -
The Water Project: Musunguu Community D -
The Water Project: Musunguu Community D -
The Water Project: Musunguu Community D -
The Water Project: Musunguu Community D -
The Water Project: Musunguu Community D -
The Water Project: Musunguu Community D -
The Water Project: Musunguu Community D -
The Water Project: Musunguu Community D -
The Water Project: Musunguu Community D -
The Water Project: Musunguu Community D -
The Water Project: Musunguu Community D -
The Water Project: Musunguu Community D -
The Water Project: Musunguu Community D -
The Water Project: Musunguu Community D -
The Water Project: Musunguu Community D -
The Water Project: Musunguu Community D -
The Water Project: Musunguu Community D -
The Water Project: Musunguu Community D -
The Water Project: Musunguu Community D -
The Water Project: Musunguu Community D -
The Water Project: Musunguu Community D -
The Water Project: Musunguu Community D -
The Water Project: Musunguu Community D -
The Water Project: Musunguu Community D -

Project Status



Project Type:  Dug Well and Hand Pump

Regional Program: Southeastern Kenya WaSH Program

Impact: 392 Served

Project Phase:  In Service - Dec 2016

Functionality Status:  Water Flowing - Needs Attention

Last Checkup: 10/24/2019

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



Community Profile

This project is a part of our shared program with Africa Sand Dam Foundation. Our team is pleased to directly share the below report (edited for clarity, as needed).

Welcome to the Community

Musunguu Self-Help Group is located in the highland of Makueni County. The main economic activity in this area is horticultural farming. All farming here is solely dependent on River Tawa.

There is a sand dam on this river, and the majority of farms get water from pumps that rely on this sand dam. In recent years, intense farming has affected the water supply at this particular dam. Droughts have further exacerbated this strain, and there is now constant competition at the sand dam for who can get in line first for water. Women try to get there early enough so they can have water for household chores, but there are always long lines at the dam.

Water Situation

Water at the sand dam is accessed at scoop holes dug by community members. These holes in the riverbed don’t have to be dug very deep to reach the water provided by the dam.

Many farmers are using petrol pumps to transport water from the dam to their crops. Farmer Richard has noticed this is a common practice, and said, “We fear that the water quality from our current water source is heavily polluted. Everyone is using petrol generators to pump water from the river, and this may be a source of pollution to the water.” Thus, locals have made a request for help in building a shallow well adjacent to the sand dam. In reality, we conducted a water quality test and found that the water is contaminated, but not by petrol. The drinking water fetched from the scoop holes is contaminated by fecal matter. Because the shallow holes are open sources at the surface, they are unprotected from contamination.

Women and children commonly use covered 20-liter plastic jerrycans to carry water home from the sand dam. Since the river is a ways away, community members aim to make as few water trips as possible. Large water reservoirs at home help minimize the trips to the dam. These range from 200 to 300 liters, depending on what households can afford. Families without young children try their best to have more water storage, since young people are charged with helping their families fetch water. You can see examples of some of these containers under the “See Photos & Video” tab.

The trip to fetch water isn’t what consumes a lot of time; scoop holes are so overused that women and children spend most of their time in line. A hand-dug well won’t only protect water from outside contamination (such as fecal matter!), but will provide another option that decreases congestion at the sand dam.

Sanitation Situation

Since we’ve already been engaging with this community for three years, every single household now has a pit latrine. Almost the same number of families have bathing rooms reserved for personal hygiene. Over half of people have a hand-washing station on their property. Dish racks and clotheslines are also being used to safely dry belongings. Garbage is disposed of in a compost pit, which is then used as fertilizer on farms.

Plans: Hygiene and Sanitation Review

Since this group has attended training before, we will continue by filling in any gaps in understanding. After discovering the contamination of water in the scoop holes, we’ve decided to focus on water point maintenance, water handling, water storage, and treatment.

Plans: Hand-Dug Well

We plan to excavate to a depth of at least 25 feet. Our experience has shown us that this yields an adequate and sustainable supply of water from the dam. This well will be lined with concrete and fitted with an AfriDev pump. With this well adjacent to the sand dam, farmers and their families will have a protected source of water that’s free from surface runoff. While people get their drinking water from the well, scoop holes become reserved for irrigation, watering animals, and domestic uses.

Project Updates


12/20/2017: A Year Later: Musunguu Community Hand-Dug Well

A year ago, generous donors helped build a hand-dug well for the Musunguu Self-Help Group in Kenya. Because of these gifts and our monthly donors, partners are able to visit project sites throughout the year, strengthening relationships with communities and evaluating the actual water project. These consistent visits allow us to learn vital lessons and hear amazing stories – we’re excited to share this one from our partner Mutheu Mutune with you.


The Water Project : 4497-musunguu


Project Photos


Project Type

Dug Well and Hand Pump

Hand-dug wells are best suited for clay, sand, gravel and mixed soil ground formations. A large diameter well is dug by hand, and then lined with either bricks or concrete to prevent contamination and collapse of the well. Once a water table is hit, the well is capped and a hand-pump is installed – creating a complete and enclosed water system.


A Year Later: Musunguu Community Hand-Dug Well

December, 2017

We are thankful and grateful for this project because things like diseases have decreased and we can now afford three meals a day which come from our small plots in our home. I won’t fail to mention the improved performance for my children who no longer waste time going to fetch water but rather use the time to read and do their homework.

Keeping The Water Promise

There's an incredible community of monthly donors who have come alongside you in supporting clean water in Musunguu Community D.

This giving community supports ongoing sustainability programs that help Musunguu Community D maintain access to safe, reliable water. Together, they keep The Water Promise.

We’re confident you'll love joining this world-changing group committed to sustainability!

Give Monthly

A year ago, generous donors helped build a hand-dug well for the Musunguu Self-Help Group in Kenya. Because of these gifts and our monthly donors, partners are able to visit project sites throughout the year, strengthening relationships with communities and evaluating the actual water project. These consistent visits allow us to learn vital lessons and hear amazing stories – we’re excited to share this one from our partner Mutheu Mutune with you.


People no longer have to walk over three kilometers to find water, which wasn’t even clean. Now, they have their own clean water source less than a kilometer away for every single group member. The water has enabled them to start a tree nursery where they’ve planted fruit trees such as avocado, mango, pawpaw, and then some timber trees. Once these trees mature and start bearing fruits, the community will be big suppliers of fruit to the local market. The fruits will also be consumed at the family level, boosting nutrition.

The group saved so much money from vegetable sales that they were able to hire a tractor to do work on their farm.

There is now enough money to pay school fees and to invest in other income-generating activities. The training on hygiene and sanitation has also had a great impact here; no cases of waterborne diseases have been reported since we taught about proper water handling, storage, and treatment.

Mr. Joseph Mutua

We met chairman of the self-help group, Joseph Mutua, at their well to talk about the change he’s personally seen thanks to clean water being nearby. “This project has supported my farming because I planted beans which I got 27,000 shillings from and I used 9,000 shillings to buy other seeds for the next planting. The rest of the money I saved and I used to develop my home and support the development of my family.

My children no longer waste time like before, going to look for water for domestic use because we have a water source near us which is clean and safe for drinking. Their hygiene has also improved because they now wash their clothes anytime they want and they take a bath daily. Previously, one could not take a bath daily because we used to spare water. This made us stay and look dirty and uncomfortable when in the midst of other people. Our self-esteem was very low and especially my children could not perform well because of the mockery they would receive from other children at school. We are thankful and grateful for this project because things like diseases have decreased and we can now afford three meals a day which come from our small plots in our home. I won’t fail to mention the improved performance for my children who no longer waste time going to fetch water but rather use the time to read and do their homework.”

Eunice Mwende

16-year-old Enuice Mwende agreed and added: “Water for the livestock is also available. Before the livestock would die on the way while looking for drinking water. And diseases have decreased, and I am now more comfortable and confident to talk in social situations.”

Staff checking the well at a December 21, 2017 monitoring visit. Clean water is indeed still flowing!


The Water Project and our partners are committed to consistent monitoring of each water source. Our monitoring and evaluation program, made possible by monthly donors, allows us to visit communities up to four times a year. Read more about our program and how you can help.


Navigating through intense dry spells, performing preventative maintenance, conducting quality repairs when needed and continuing to assist community leaders to manage water points are all normal parts of keeping projects sustainable. The Water Promise community supports ongoing sustainability programs that help Musunguu Community D maintain access to safe, reliable water.

We’d love for you to join this world-changing group committed to sustainability.

The most impactful way to continue your support of Musunguu Community D – and hundreds of other places just like this – is by joining our community of monthly givers.

Your monthly giving will help provide clean water, every month... keeping The Water Promise!

Give Monthly


Contributors

Project Sponsor - Estate of Rachel Zik