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The Water Project: Eshitowa Community -  Clean Water
The Water Project: Eshitowa Community -  Clean Water
The Water Project: Eshitowa Community -  Clean Water
The Water Project: Eshitowa Community -  Clean Water
The Water Project: Eshitowa Community -  Clean Water
The Water Project: Eshitowa Community -  Clean Water
The Water Project: Eshitowa Community -  Clean Water
The Water Project: Eshitowa Community -  Reviewing With The Committee
The Water Project: Eshitowa Community -  Reviewing With The Committee
The Water Project: Eshitowa Community -  Reviewing With The Committee
The Water Project: Eshitowa Community -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Eshitowa Community -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Eshitowa Community -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Eshitowa Community -  Pump Installation
The Water Project: Eshitowa Community -  Well Pad Construction
The Water Project: Eshitowa Community -  Well Pad Construction
The Water Project: Eshitowa Community -  Well Pad Construction
The Water Project: Eshitowa Community -  Drilling
The Water Project: Eshitowa Community -  Drilling
The Water Project: Eshitowa Community -  Drilling
The Water Project: Eshitowa Community -  Drilling
The Water Project: Eshitowa Community -  Drilling
The Water Project: Eshitowa Community -  Drilling
The Water Project: Eshitowa Community -  Drilling
The Water Project: Eshitowa Community -  Drill Rig
The Water Project: Eshitowa Community -  Community
The Water Project: Eshitowa Community -  Community
The Water Project: Eshitowa Community -  Community
The Water Project: Eshitowa Community -  Community
The Water Project: Eshitowa Community -  We Were Thankful For Our Vehicle To Help Us Get To The Spring
The Water Project: Eshitowa Community -  We Were Thankful For Our Vehicle To Help Us Get To The Spring
The Water Project: Eshitowa Community -  Current Water Sources
The Water Project: Eshitowa Community -  Current Water Sources
The Water Project: Eshitowa Community -  Current Water Sources
The Water Project: Eshitowa Community -  Current Water Sources
The Water Project: Eshitowa Community -  Current Water Sources
The Water Project: Eshitowa Community -  Current Water Sources
The Water Project: Eshitowa Community -  Current Water Sources
The Water Project: Eshitowa Community -  Latrine Up The Hill From Water Source

Project Status



Project Type:  Borehole Well and Hand Pump

Regional Program: Western Kenya WaSH Program

Impact: 500 Served

Project Phase:  Installed - Mar 2018

Functionality Status:  Functional

Last Checkup: 10/24/2018

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



Community Profile

This project is a part of our shared program with Safe Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Initiative (SAWASHI) of Kenya. Our team is pleased to directly share the below report (edited for clarity, as needed).

Welcome to the Community

Early in the morning, men and women wake up to do their daily chores while their children who are at least six-years-old prepare to go to school. At the time of our visit, every single adult was away from home, gone to their small farms to prepare their land for planting. During this time, it is difficult to gather people together since everyone is so busy on their farms. Farming activities begin as early as 6am and go until noon, when women go back home to prepare lunch for their children who are sent out of school to find food. Men then transition to feeding their livestock like cattle, sheep and goats.

For most of the people from this community, agriculture is the main source of income. Only a few young people have moved away for white collar jobs.

A majority of the people in Eshitowa speak Wanga, even the women who came from other tribes to marry into this community. The majority of community members are Christians, while the rest are Muslims. There are two mosques and four churches for them to attend.

Children help their parents on weekends by doing chores. For example, boys help their fathers look after the livestock, while girls help their mothers by fetching water, collecting firewood, cooking, farming, washing clothes and cleaning.

There are over 1,000 people living in this area.

(Editor’s Note: While this many people may have access on any given day, realistically a single water source can only support a population of 350-500 people. This community would be a good candidate for a second project in the future so adequate water is available. To learn more, click here.)

Water Situation

Women, having a responsibility of ensuring that water is available in the house, have a heavy burden to carry. On requesting them to take us to their current water source, one man cried out and said “You people from town will not make it on foot! You rather use the vehicle to reach the place.” We therefore decided to use our vehicle to drive there with some local women. It took us at least 30 minutes, with us having to leave the vehicle a ways away because the road was so uneven.

When we got there, more than 10 women were already in line waiting to fetch water from a protected spring which only discharges drops of water at a time. It takes approximately 10 to 15 minutes to fill an 20-liter container. Because some women had been waiting in line since the morning hours, they would not allow us new arrivals to fetch water until they were finished. We had to wait for more than one and a half hours to fill our own container. It was heartbreaking to see old women who struggled to go up and down hills with their containers of water. People here don’t have vehicles and must always make the walk on foot.

While we took our time to talk to the women at the spring, most of them complained of the distance to the stream which is  four kilometers, which equals time and energy wasted – not to mention the hours spent waiting once there. Pregnant women have suffered miscarriages due to the burden of carrying water from this spring, and children risk their safety walking so far along the road.

There’s no doubt the water is contaminated, whether at the spring itself or during the long journey home. There are latrines built nearby this spring. After drinking this water, community members often get diarrhea and are diagnoses with typhoid.

There are other locations where water has pooled to the surface, and you’ll find many people stop to fill their containers with dirty water to avoid a longer walk.

Sanitation Situation

Over 75% of households have a pit latrine. The most common latrine is made of mud and stick walls and an iron sheet roof. Sugar sacks hang in the doorway for privacy.

We found out that another program came in and taught everyone how to build hand-washing stations, but these weren’t maintained because of water scarcity. However, most households have and use other helpful tools like dish racks and clotheslines.

65-year-old Nelson Sumba said, “Most people in this village do not wash hands after visiting the toilet. Common diseases in this community include malaria, typhoid, diarrhea and skin diseases. Sometimes children skip school because of stomach ailments. Recently, my daughter suffered from diarrhea and she missed school for a whole week.”

Plans: Hygiene and Sanitation Training

Hygiene and sanitation training will be held with community members for three days.

We will cover the topics below and many more:

– Proper hand-washing

– Water-handling and storage

– Food preparation and storage

– Water treatment methods

– Preventing waterborne diseases (specifically diarrhea and typhoid)

– Developing positive attitudes about hygiene and sanitation

Our trainers will use posters that illustrate both good and bad hygiene practices. Group discussions, role plays, and demonstrations will keep everyone involved with the important information they’re learning.

On the third day of training, we will focus on strengthening a water user committee to properly manage and maintain the new well. The committee will draft rules for proper behavior around the water point and will also ensure that community members contribute a fee to be saved for any future repairs. If they encounter any problems, they are to contact the SAWASHI head office. And in the meantime, we will continue to visit Eshitowa Community and their new well.

Plans: New Borehole

This borehole is an exciting opportunity for The Water Project and its partners. We have been undertaking a rigorous vetting of drillers to find the best team and drill rig. We will also be receiving a shipment of LifePumps, a newly developed stainless steel pump for deep borehole wells. This pump has less moving parts, so we envision easier maintenance and more uptime. But until then, we’ll install an AfriDev pump so community members can have immediate access to clean water.

The community first proposed a very central location for the borehole. However, a hydrogeologist ran five different tests and found that the only suitable location is on one edge of Eshitowa. Still, the community members are happy to have an approved location, and have since donated that land for the borehole.

Project Updates


04/25/2018: Eshitowa Community Project Complete

Eshitowa Community, Kenya now has a new source of water thanks to your donation. A new borehole has been drilled! Households have sanitation facilities and are practicing good hygiene, and community members attended training on how to best manage and maintain their new water source.

Borehole

The first part of our borehole process is a hydrogeological survey which determines the water levels and the soil formation of potential sites. The second stage is to conduct an environmental impact assessment and come up with a report to submit. We analyze the potential positive and negative impacts of this new water source. Those impacts can be:

  1. Social – does this bring the community together, or will they fight over this resource?
  2. Economical
  3. Environmental

The government bodies responsible for the EIA and licensing processes are the Water Resource Management Authority (WARMA) and National Environmental Management Authority, (NEMA). Both of these are issued at a cost.

With our license to drill at Eshitowa in hand, we approached drilling companies for their quotes. We wanted to gather recommendations, prices, and machinery specifications to inform our final decision. We put forward a down payment to ensure the drill rig was on its way with a drilling team that stood out from the crowd.

The drilling process started off well with loose soil down to 50 meters. The first aquifer was struck at 30 meters and the second was struck at 42 meters. Another 50 meters were drilled the following day.

Casing installation is what presented the most difficulty this time. Several attempts to install were not successful. Casings kept breaking even though the team was continuously surging air into the well to flush out the collapsing silt.

We called a meeting together to discuss this challenge, which resulted in us giving the OK for stainless steel casing. Casing became a slow but steady process, and the team was done with it by the end of the next day.

We then flushed the borehole for three hours, tested the yield, built a well pad, and installed an AfriDev pump. Water quality tests have since come back from the government announcing that this water is safe for human consumption!

This borehole is 100 meters deep with a static water level of 12 meters. These excellent results prove that Eshitowa Community will be the perfect location for the LifePump, which is designed for such extreme depth.

“Past attempts – even by the county government – to connect our community to a reliable water source failed completely. We had lost hope of ever getting water in our community, but now we are very happy our dreams have come true through this borehole,” exclaimed Mrs. Vwivo Obote.

“We are grateful that the donors of this project did not give up on us!”

Training

All water user committee members were present for training sessions at the new borehole. The frustration of getting dirty water from distant sources motivated them to actively participate in this project.

They were made aware of our plan to provide ongoing support for this water point, standing by to help repair whenever needed. The committee was also made aware of their responsibilities of collecting small fees from the water users to save in the case of that maintenance. Though they won’t have to pay for repair service, they’ll need to be able to cover the cost of parts.

As a result, they scheduled an action plan to open a bank account, pledged to collaborate with the rest of their community, and to build a fence around the well to keep animals away.

“We didn’t know that this training could enlighten so much. Now, we know we can achieve much more as a community out of this borehole project if we carefully plan and remain committed to our roles of operating and maintaining it. I am sure we are going to do much more,” Mr. Nelson Sumba said.

We look forward to continued relationship with Eshitowa as we visit their clean water point and observe continued growth in hygiene, sanitation, health, and overall development.


The Water Project : 24-kenya4805-clean-water


01/18/2018: Eshitowa Community Project Underway

Eshitowa Community will soon have a new source of safe, clean water thanks to your donation. A new well is being drilled and people will receive training in sanitation and hygiene. Imagine the difference these resources will make for this community!

We just posted an initial report from our partner in the field including information about the village, maps, and pictures. We’ll keep you posted as the work progresses.


The Water Project : 4-kenya4805-current-water-sources


Project Photos


Project Type

Borehole and Hand Pump

Girls and women walk long distances for water when safe water is very often right under their feet! Underground rivers, called aquifers, often contain a constant supply of safe water – but you have to get to it. No matter what machine or piece of equipment is used, all drilling is aiming for a borehole that reaches into an aquifer. If the aquifer has water - and after the well is developed - we are able to pull water to the surface utilizing a hand-pump. If all goes as planned, the community is left with a safe, closed water source providing around 5 gallons of water a minute through a hand-pump.



Contributors

1 individual donor(s)