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The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Finished Tank
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Finished Tank
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Finished Tank
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Finished Tank
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Finished Tank
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Flowing Water
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  New Latrines
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Sharon Mundia At The New Latrines
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Tank Construction
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Tank Construction
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Tank Construction
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Tank Construction
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Tank Construction
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Tank Construction
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Latrine Construction
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Sinking Pit For Latrines
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Training
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Training
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Handwashing Training
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Training
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Handwashing Training
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Handwashing Training
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Training
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Training
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Training
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Training
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Students Walk Down Hill To Protected Spring
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Students Collect Water From Protected Spring
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Students Carry Water Buckets
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Students Carry Water Buckets Down The Road
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Students Carry Water Back Up Hill
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Students Bring Water Into School
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Students Bring Water Back To School
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Storage Containers In The Teachers And Matrons Houses
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Sample Latrines
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Schools Compound
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Schools Matron
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  School Administration Building
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  School Sign
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Plastic Water Tank At The School

Project Status



Project Type:  Rainwater Catchment

Regional Program: Western Kenya WaSH Program

Impact: 500 Served

Project Phase:  In Service - Dec 2018

Functionality Status:  Functional

Last Checkup: 08/24/2019

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



It’s 5:00 am in the morning and activities have already started for the 504 students and 24 teachers at staff at Kapasambo Secondary School, located in the Sabatia District of Vihiga County, Kenya.

As a person enters the school compound, they are greeted with a very clean environment. The girls’ dormitories were also clean and organized. The presence of the handwashing stations in the compound, though few, is an indication of positive hygiene behaviors.

“I am more than happy today to host you in my school,” school founder Madam Jessica Demensi said.

“We have had numerous challenges in regard to water and sanitation. From waterborne diseases to wasting time. We are so happy that this will be a thing of the past. God bless you all.”

Both boys and girls are seen running around with their buckets to fetch water for bathing and washing up. The cleaning commences and ends at around 6am when they proceed to take breakfast.

At 7am, morning study hall begins as day scholars also begin streaming through the gate. At 8am, there is an assembly when all the students line up for prayers and announcements.

People in the surrounding community specialize in planting tea for commercial purposes. This tea is supplied to Kaimosi and Mudete tea factories.

After assembly, a class is sent to fetch water for making school lunch.

The school is connected to Lake Victoria North Water services, but it is irregular and expensive. They are lucky if it works one day a week. They also have a plastic water tank, an initiative of the parents. This 5,000-liter plastic tank is used to harvest and tap rainwater, but it runs out very quickly because this is a boarding school.

Due to the demand and high population, this water tank cannot sufficiently serve this school – hence they always have to go to the nearest water stream.

Students have buckets and basins that they use for fetching the water – none of these containers have covers.

They travel down the hill.

This water source is at the bottom of a hill and is in bad condition.

Then, students must go back up the hill with the heavy water. In the year 2016, there was an outbreak of typhoid and cholera in the school, prompting the closure of the school for over two weeks.

It takes an average of 40 minutes to and from the spring.

Morning classes have a few breaks until lunch. After lunch, classes progress until 3pm when there is another break.

Later, all students are sent to fetch more water for cleaning up and washing. The school administration does not allow the students to store water in the dormitories so as to avoid accidents and pneumonia attacks due to colds. They, therefore, must go both in the morning and evening to fetch water for bathing, cleaning and washing up.

The latrines on the school grounds are made of concrete. Though they are still in good condition, they are old and almost full. This is due to the pressure experienced by the huge population.

As a result of the lack of water, the hygienic conditions are not up to standard.

The evening study hall picks up after 7pm. The routine repeats itself day in and day out.

Here’s what we’re going to do about it:

Training

Training will be held for two days. The facilitator will use PHAST (participatory hygiene and sanitation transformation), ABCD (asset-based community development), CTC (child to child), lectures, group discussions, and handouts to teach health topics and ways to promote good practices within the school. The CTC method will prepare students to lead other students into healthy habits, as well as kickstart a CTC club for the school.

Handwashing Stations

This CTC club will oversee the new facilities, such as handwashing stations, and make sure they are kept clean and in working condition. The two handwashing stations will be delivered to the school, and the club will fill them with water on a daily basis and make sure there is always a cleaning agent such as soap or ash.

VIP Latrines

Two triple-door latrines will be constructed with local materials that the school will help gather. Three doors will serve the girls while the other three serve the boys. And with a new source of water on school grounds, students and staff should have enough to keep these new latrines clean.

Rainwater Catchment Tank

A 50,000-liter rainwater catchment tank will help alleviate the water crisis at this school. The school will also help gather the needed materials such as sand, rocks, and water from the spring for mixing cement. Once finished, this tank can begin catching rainfall that will be used by the school’s students and staff.

We and the school strongly believe that with this assistance, standards will significantly improve. These higher standards will translate to better academic performance!

Project Updates


12/28/2018: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary Project Complete

There is a new rainwater catchment system at Precious School Kapsambo Secondary! Students have a source of safe, clean water thanks to your support. Handwashing stations were installed so that students can clean up after using their new latrines, and students and staff have received training in sanitation and hygiene.

New Knowledge

We let the principal know about the need for hygiene and sanitation training for students and staff. Since she was away, she asked the school accountant to organize the students. 16 students were recruited from form one to form four. These student leaders will learn about good health habits and form a student health club to inform their peers at school and families at home. There were also two teacher representatives along with the deputy principal.

Students and teachers gathered in the school library for training.

The students and their teachers needed knowledge on how to improve standards of hygiene and ensure that the sanitation facilities given to them are well-maintained for years to come. Some of the topics we covered included water pollution and treatment methods, handwashing, dental hygiene, operations and maintenance of the facilities, group dynamics, and leadership and governance.

These leadership activities segued into the establishment of a student health club and the election of its leaders. This club will share the message of good hygiene and health that they learned during training.

Learning about how the tank works and how to care for it.

Students really liked learning about handwashing. The trainer demonstrated ten steps to thorough handwashing in a way that was easy to remember. This was special because the participants learned to improvise when they don’t have soap. They can use ash as a form of detergent.

They said they never knew that ash could be used for cleaning purposes and promised to use it and pass this information to their parents, who sometimes lack the money to buy soap.

The participants were eager to adopt what they had been trained on, and the student health club chairperson, Keith Tamba, organized for a day the following week when the club members would train the rest of the school.

“This training has been very informative since we have learned how to improve our hygiene practices and also improvise by use of ash for cleaning and leaky tins as handwashing stations,” said 18-year-old Brian Ogot.

“We have also been taught how to maintain the facilities and we promise to take good care of them.”

Handwashing Stations

Pupils can now enjoy washing their hands with soap thanks to the two handwashing stations that were delivered to their school. These new handwashing opportunities will help reduce cases of hygiene-related illness. The training on hygiene has motivated these students to share what they’ve learned with their peers at school and families at home.

VIP Latrines

This project funded the installation of six new ventilated improved pit latrines. These were all given to the female students since they had the greatest need. All of these new latrines have cement floors that are easy to use and clean. And with a rainwater catchment tank, there should be enough water to keep them clean all the time.

Rainwater Catchment Tank

Construction for this 50,000-liter rainwater catchment tank was successful!

“We are very excited about this project because we will no longer waste time going to fetch water outside the school compound, which is far away,” said Sharon Mundia.

“Now we will have enough time to study and improve our performance in class.”

Sharon Mundia

The Process:

Our staff and the school administration started by looking around the school to determine the best location for their new rainwater catchment tank. This needed to be the best site with good, clean roofing to catch the rainwater. Then, we cleared the site: excavating the soil within the required measurements to make level ground for the tank foundation. The foundation was cast by laying stones on a level ground and then reinforcing it using steel, concrete and waterproof cement.

Tank foundation

Both the drawing pipe as well as the washout pipe were affixed as the foundation was lain. The wall was built with ferro-cement techniques through six layers. The inner wall was plastered while rough casting was done on the outer part.

The catchment area was dug, plastered, and a staircase installed so students can easily get water from the tap.

Beginning to dig the catchment area

Dome construction could begin after the superstructure had been given enough time to settle. The manhole cover was fitted, inlet pipes were connected to the roof gutters, inlet screens, ventilation pipes (breathers) and overflow pipes were all done to standard.

Once finished, the tank was given three weeks to undergo complete curing before it was cleaned and handed over to Precious School Kapsambo Secondary, though we will continue to offer them great support as a part of our monitoring and maintenance program.


The Water Project : 23-kenya18075-finished-tank


12/04/2018: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary Project Underway

A severe clean water shortage at Precious School Kapsambo Secondary drains students’ time, energy, and health. Thanks to your generosity, we’re working to install a clean water point and much more.

Get to know your school through the introduction and pictures we’ve posted, and read about this water, sanitation and hygiene project. We look forward to reaching out with more good news!


The Water Project : kenya18075-students-carry-water-buckets-down-the-road


Project Photos


Project Type

Rainwater Catchment

Rainwater is collected off strategic areas of a roof, enters a custom guttering system (which filters out debris) and leads to a storage tank. Tanks can vary in sizes and are determined by population and average rainfall patterns. Water can be stored for months, is easily treated in the tank, and is accessible through taps. These projects are implemented at schools with proper roof lines and gutter systems to make them successful.