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The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Students Walk Down Hill To Protected Spring
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Students Collect Water From Protected Spring
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Students Carry Water Buckets Down The Road
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Students Carry Water Back Up Hill
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Students Bring Water Into School
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Storage Containers In The Teachers And Matrons Houses
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Schools Matron
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Schools Compound
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  School Sign
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  School Administration Building
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Sample Latrines
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Plastic Water Tank At The School
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Mrs Jessicah Demesi The Principal
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Madam Jesicah Demesi Standing Next To The Girls Dormitry Named After Her As The Pioneer Of The Girls Education
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Latrine And Clothesline
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Hanging Clothes On Flower Beds
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Girls Dormitories
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Girls Birthrooms
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Dining Hall
The Water Project: Precious School Kapsambo Secondary -  Clothes Hang On Schools Fence

Project Status



Project Type:  Rainwater Catchment

Regional Program: Western Kenya WaSH Program

Project Phase:  Donate to this Project
Estimated Install Date (?):  02/28/2019

Project Features


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Community Profile

It’s 5am in the morning and activities have already started in Kapasambo Secondary School located in the Sabatia District of Vihiga County, Kenya.

As a person enters the school compound, they are greeted with a very clean compound. The girls’ dormitories were also very clean and organized. The presence of the hand washing artisans in the compound though few is an indication of positive hygiene behaviors.

“I am more than happy today to host you in my school,” school founder Madam Jessica Demensi said.

“We have had numerous challenges in regard to water and sanitation. From waterborne diseases to wasting time. We are so happy that this will be a thing of the past. God bless you all.”

Both boys and girls are seen running around with their buckets to fetch water for bathing and washing up. The cleaning commences and ends at around 6am when they proceed to take breakfast.

At 7am morning preps begin as the few days scholars also begin streaming in the compound. At 8am there is an assembly and all students line up for prayers and announcements.

This community is specialized in planting tea for commercial purposes. This tea is supplied to Kaimosi and Mudete tea factories.

After assembly, a class is sent to fetch water for making school lunch.

The school has tap water from Lake Victoria North Water services board that is very irregular. They also have a plastic water tank, an initiative of the parents. This 5,000-liter plastic tank is used to harvest and tap rainwater. When its full pupils fetch water from the tap.

Due to the demand and high population, this water tank cannot sufficiently serve this school – hence they always have to go to the nearest water stream.

Students have buckets and basins that they use for fetching the water – none of these containers have covers.

They travel down the hill.

This stream in unprotected and pupils fetch water by dunking their water containers directly in the water. Being located on the lowland, it’s always open to contamination from humans and animals by runoff and stormwater after the rains.

Then back up the hill with the heavy water. In the year 2016, there was an outbreak of typhoid and cholera in the school, prompting the closure of the school for over two weeks.

And finally back to school with the collected water. They take an average of 40 minutes to and from the spring.

Morning classes have a few breaks until lunch. After lunch, classes progress until 3pm when there is another break.

All students are sent to fetch more water for cleaning up and washing. The school administration does not allow the students to store water in the dormitories so as to avoid accidents and pneumonia attacks due to colds. They, therefore, must go both in the morning and evening to fetch water for bathing, cleaning and washing up.

The latrines on the school grounds are made of concrete. Though they are still in good condition, they are old and almost full. This is due to the pressure experienced by the huge population.

As a result of lack of water, the hygienic conditions are not up to standard.

The evening preps pick up after 7pm. The routine repeats itself day in day out.

Here’s what we’re going to do about it:

Training

Training will be held for two days. The facilitator will use PHAST (participatory hygiene and sanitation transformation), ABCD (asset-based community development), CTC (child to child), lectures, group discussions, and handouts to teach health topics and ways to promote good practices within the school. The CTC method will prepare students to lead other students into healthy habits, as well as kickstart a CTC club for the school.

Handwashing Stations

This CTC club will oversee the new facilities, such as handwashing stations, and make sure they are kept clean and in working condition. The two handwashing stations will be delivered to the school, and the club will fill them with water on a daily basis and make sure there is always a cleaning agent such as soap or ash.

VIP Latrines

Two triple-door latrines will be constructed with local materials that the school will help gather. Three doors will serve the girls while the other three serve the boys. And with a new source of water on school grounds, students and staff should have enough to keep these new latrines clean.

Rainwater Catchment Tank

A 50,000-liter rainwater catchment tank will help alleviate the water crisis at this school. The school will also help gather the needed materials such as sand, rocks, and water from the spring for mixing cement. Once finished, this tank can begin catching rainfall that will be used by the school’s students and staff.

We and the school strongly believe that with this assistance, standards will significantly improve. These higher standards will translate to better academic performance!


This project is a part of our shared program with Western Water And Sanitation Forum (WEWASAFO). Our team is pleased to provide the reports for this project (edited for readability) thanks to the hard work of our friends in Kenya.

We're just getting started, check back soon!


Project Photos


Project Type

Rainwater Catchment

Rainwater is collected off strategic areas of a roof, enters a custom guttering system (which filters out debris) and leads to a storage tank. Tanks can vary in sizes and are determined by population and average rainfall patterns. Water can be stored for months, is easily treated in the tank, and is accessible through taps. These projects are implemented at schools with proper roof lines and gutter systems to make them successful.



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