Loading images...
The Water Project: Lung'u Secondary School -
The Water Project: Lung'u Secondary School -
The Water Project: Lung'u Secondary School -
The Water Project: Lung'u Secondary School -
The Water Project: Lung'u Secondary School -
The Water Project: Lung'u Secondary School -
The Water Project: Lung'u Secondary School -
The Water Project: Lung'u Secondary School -
The Water Project: Lung'u Secondary School -
The Water Project: Lung'u Secondary School -
The Water Project: Lung'u Secondary School -
The Water Project: Lung'u Secondary School -
The Water Project: Lung'u Secondary School -
The Water Project: Lung'u Secondary School -
The Water Project: Lung'u Secondary School -
The Water Project: Lung'u Secondary School -
The Water Project: Lung'u Secondary School -
The Water Project: Lung'u Secondary School -
The Water Project: Lung'u Secondary School -
The Water Project: Lung'u Secondary School -
The Water Project: Lung'u Secondary School -
The Water Project: Lung'u Secondary School -
The Water Project: Lung'u Secondary School -
The Water Project: Lung'u Secondary School -
The Water Project: Lung'u Secondary School -
The Water Project: Lung'u Secondary School -
The Water Project: Lung'u Secondary School -

Project Status



Project Type:  Rainwater Catchment

Regional Program: Southeastern Kenya WaSH Program

Impact: 288 Served

Project Phase:  Installed - Mar 2017

Functionality Status:  Functional

Last Checkup: 10/16/2018

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



Community Profile

This project is a part of our shared program with Africa Sand Dam Foundation. Our team is pleased to directly share the below report (edited for clarity, as needed).

Welcome to the School

Lung’u Secondary School is a mix of day students and boarding students located in Lung’u village, Kisau Division of Makueni County. Out of the student population of 288, only 18 girls are boarders but more are requesting to board. During the week, boarders only get 5 liters of water for bathing and cleaning, but that increases to 20 liters on Saturdays and Sundays when a more thorough cleaning is carried out. All of the day scholars have to report to school at 6:30 each morning. There are nine 40-minute lessons each day. Teaching starts at 8AM and ends at 4PM with tea and lunch breaks in between.

Water Situation

Lung’u has a few small plastic tanks for rainwater on campus. However, this rainwater doesn’t meet students’ needs for many days. Thus, the administration pays for water to be trucked into school from a borehole that is 8 kilometers away. Other water vendors load up their donkeys with plastic barrels of water to sell to the school at 25 shillings per 20 liters.

Not only is this a daily expenditure for the school, but it also becomes a cost for the student. After drinking water from these sources, students suffer from waterborne diseases and often miss school for treatment and recovery.

Sanitation Situation

There are 15 pit latrines shared by both the boarders and day students. These are in fairly good condition. Some are made of iron sheets, while others are made of caked mud or cement.

There are three bathing rooms for the boarders, but only one hand-washing station intended for the staff’s use.

Plans: Hygiene and Sanitation Training

Students and staff will be trained for one day. Those in attendance will form a hygiene club that will promote good hygiene and sanitation practices both at school and home. They will learn all of the steps to proper hand-washing, how to treat water, and how to keep their environment clean. The school will also be taught how to best oversee and maintain their new rainwater catchment tank and hand-washing stations.

Plans: Hand-Washing Stations

Three hand-washing stations will be delivered at the project’s completion. These are 1,000-liter plastic tanks fitted with taps. The hygiene club and school management will be responsible for making sure tanks are filled with water and that a cleaning agent such as soap or ash is available.

Plans: Rainwater Catchment Tank

We will build a 104,000-liter rainwater catchment tank for Ndwaani Primary School. This water will benefit the students, teachers, and supplementary staff. Parents will mobilize the materials needed for construction, such as sand and stone. They will also lend some strong arms to help with the actual construction.

The huge capacity of this tank makes the others look tiny in comparison; 104,000 liters should collect enough water to carry students through the entire dry season. As soon as the tank has time to cure, it can begin to collect rainwater for drinking, cooking and cleaning!

Project Updates


12/20/2017: A Year Later: Lung'u Secondary School

A year ago, generous donors helped build a rainwater catchment tank and latrines for the Lung’u Secondary School in Western Kenya. Because of these gifts and the contributions of our monthly donors, our partners are able to visit project sites throughout the year, strengthening relationships with communities and evaluating the actual water project. These consistent visits allow us learn vital lessons and hear amazing stories – we’re excited to share this one from our partner Titus Mbithi with you.


The Water Project : asdf_lungu-secondary-school_shg_yar_daniel-titus-fridah-5


03/28/2017: Lung'u Secondary School Project Complete

We are very excited to report that, thanks to your willingness to help, the students and staff of Lung’u Secondary School in Kenya have a new source of safe, clean water: A new rainwater catchment system has been built. Hand-washing stations have been installed, and students and staff have received training in sanitation and hygiene. Just imagine the difference these resources will make in the lives of these people! You made it happen, now help keep the water flowing! Join our team of monthly donors and help us maintain this rainwater catchment tank and many other projects.

We also just updated the project page with new pictures. Make sure to click on the “See Photos & Video” tab to check them out! The report below shares the latest details of the project.

Project Result: New Knowledge and Hand-Washing Stations

We organized training sessions through the school principal, who ensured that every single student could attend! Sure enough, all 194 students were in attendance. They actively participated through the three hours that covered topics on safe water, diarrhea, and hand-washing.

Safe water sessions talked about water sources, water handling, water storage, and water treatment. The sessions on diarrhea talked about the many causes of diarrhea and how to prevent it. This was particularly important because diarrhea is the main cause of death for children. Hand-washing is the cheapest way to prevent diarrhea and its spread, so we set aside extra time to talk about when and how to wash hands.

We used this opportunity to strengthen the student health club on campus. These students will promote healthy practices and teach their peers about what they learned. The club will hold activities to help popularize using latrines and washing hands.

Project Result: Rainwater Catchment Tank

Construction on this rainwater catchment tank began on December 2, 2016.

Parents of Lung’u students began collecting materials like stones, ballast and sand and delivering them to the project site. This was the longest step of the process, with material mobilization taking over one month.

There were also delays to starting actual construction because of national exams and holiday vacation through December and January. Building the tank took three and a half weeks, and then it had to cure for another couple of weeks before it could start collecting rainwater.

As of now, this finished 104,000-liter rainwater catchment tank has been handed over to the school and is gathering water. Nicholas Mwendwa, a form four student and chairperson of the health club said, “Now that we have a very big tank in our school which can hold a lot of water, we believe that we will be able to access clean drinking water. A lot of diarrhea diseases will be done away with. And now that we have plenty of water in our school, we hope to increase the number of boarding students. The cost of buying water too will be minimized!”


The Water Project : 19-kenya4505-finished-tank


Project Photos


Project Type

Rainwater Catchment

Rainwater is collected off strategic areas of a roof, enters a custom guttering system (which filters out debris) and leads to a storage tank. Tanks can vary in sizes and are determined by population and average rainfall patterns. Water can be stored for months, is easily treated in the tank, and is accessible through taps. These projects are implemented at schools with proper roof lines and gutter systems to make them successful.



Contributors

Project Sponsor - The Lifeplus Foundation

A Year Later: Lung'u Secondary School

December, 2017

More water is now available for the boarding students. Formerly, we had five liters per day. Now, we have 10 liters per day. This has improved student cleanliness.

A year ago, generous donors helped build a rainwater harvesting tank and latrines for the Lung’u Secondary School in Western Kenya. Because of these gifts and the contributions of our monthly donors, our partners are able to visit project sites throughout the year, strengthening relationships with communities and evaluating the actual water project. These consistent visits allow us learn vital lessons and hear amazing stories – we’re excited to share this one from our partner Titus Mbithi with you.


Clean water has changed the culture at Lung’u. There is no more stress about where water is going to come from, and about whether or not it’s safe to drink. There is enough for both students and staff.

Furthermore, there are higher standards of hygiene and sanitation, and the hand-washing stations are still being used by students.

Thumbs up for clean water to drink!

We met Deputy Principal Daniel Musembi at the rainwater catchment tank to talk about the impact it’s had over the past year. “We now have enough water supply in the school.” And since it’s no longer necessary to buy water from vendors, “the school is saving on average 18,000 shillings per month. Cases of students falling sick have decreased significantly, all owing to the clean water access.”

Fridah Nduku

17-year-old Fridah Nduku is a boarding student who relies on her water needs through day and night. She said that “more water is now available for the boarding students. Formerly, we had five liters per day. Now, we have 10 liters per day. This has improved student cleanliness. Hand-washing stations have also improved the levels of hygiene and sanitation.” When we asked if there were any big problems she was still facing, she responded by saying “most of her problems have been solved by the tank.”


The Water Project and our partners are committed to consistent monitoring of each water source. Our monitoring and evaluation program, made possible by monthly donors, allows us to visit communities up to 4 times a year. Read more about our program and how you can help.