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The Water Project: Cheptulu Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Cheptulu Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Cheptulu Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Cheptulu Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Cheptulu Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Cheptulu Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Cheptulu Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Cheptulu Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Cheptulu Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Cheptulu Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Cheptulu Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Cheptulu Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Cheptulu Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Cheptulu Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Cheptulu Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Cheptulu Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Cheptulu Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Cheptulu Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Cheptulu Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Cheptulu Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Cheptulu Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Cheptulu Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Cheptulu Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Cheptulu Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Cheptulu Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Cheptulu Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Cheptulu Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Cheptulu Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Cheptulu Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Cheptulu Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Cheptulu Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Cheptulu Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Cheptulu Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Cheptulu Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Cheptulu Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project -

Project Status



Project Type:  Rainwater Catchment

Regional Program: Western Kenya WaSH Program

Impact: 500 Served

Project Phase:  In Service - Jul 2016

Functionality Status:  Functional

Last Checkup: 09/05/2019

Project Features


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Community Profile

This project is a part of our shared program with Western Water And Sanitation Forum (WEWASAFO). Our team is pleased to directly share the below report (edited for clarity, as needed).

Welcome to the School

The Cheptulu Primary School is located in Shaviringa location, Cheptulu sub-location, Shiru Ward of Vihiga County. The school has a population of 647 pupils, composed of 312 boys and 335 girls. The school also employs 13 teachers, out of which four are female and nine are male. (Editor’s Note: While this many people may have access on any given day, realistically a single water source can only support a population of 350-500 people. This site would make a great location for a second project. To learn more, click here.)

A normal day entails reporting to school very early in the morning, when pupils arrive with water in their small 5-liter jerrycans to clean their classrooms in preparation for class. When they are finished with cleaning, they do morning preps and exercises for 40 minutes as teachers arrive to start their lessons. The lessons begin exactly at 8am and go to 10am when they take a short break and then return for more lessons. They take another break for lunch that lasts for one hour. They continue with lessons at 2pm until 3:45pm, when they stop for games as they wait for dismissal.

The headmaster of Cheptulu Primary School highly values education. He hates to waste time that could otherwise be spent in the classroom. He dislikes that in the course of the day, pupils must fetch water from an unprotected spring for cooking because what they carry from home is not enough. This takes 30 to 45 minutes, depending on how many people are already waiting at the spring to fetch water. The spring is 1km away from the school.

The school was selected for a project because the principal of Ebwiranyi Secondary School is a friend to the Cheptulu headmaster. The principal invited this headmaster to see what WEWASAFO had done through TWP at his own school, and the headmaster was very impressed. Cheptulu Primary School was then given the proper contact information, contacted WEWASAFO, and then the WEWASAFO team went to the school to assess the need.

Water Situation

The school has no reliable, protected source of water. Students get water from a nearby unprotected spring which is also used by local households. The spring is open to contamination, since a lot of activities are carried out around it which include: washing clothes, bathing children, and watering animals. There are even those who are in the carwash business who wash a lot of equipment in the spring. This exposes the children to many water-related diseases!

The only visible water storage equipment as one enters the school is a tank that is old and not in use. As the head teacher reports, the tank has been there for quite some time, sitting idle. The school is in desperate need of a rainwater catchment system that actually works!

Sanitation Situation

The school currently has 15 ventilated pit latrines (VIP latrines). Ten are for girls, though two of them are full. Five are for boys. This leaves the school with far fewer latrines than the WHO would recommend (1 latrine per 25 girls and 1 latrine per 30 boys). For the case of Cheptulu Primary School, one door is serving about 33 girls, and one door is serving 62 boys. Therefore, long queues are witnessed during break times, leading to a loss of precious study time! This tremendous overuse is also a health risk to the children.

The school does not have any hand-washing stations for students or staff to use. “We have been affected so much, and every now and then with waterborne diseases resulting in stomachaches and typhoid among our pupils who are always absent, which leads to poor performance. We also have inadequate facilities at which our pupils queue, wasting a lot of time for when they are to be in class,” said Head Teacher John Isatia.

Despite this difficult situation, the school’s attitude towards sanitation and hygiene is positive. They are willing to be trained on different topics to bring about healthy changes.

Plans: Hygiene and Sanitation Training

Students and staff will be trained over three days using Participatory Hygiene and Sanitation Training (PHAST), Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS), and Asset-Based Community Development (ABCD) methods. Training will include group discussions, lectures, presentations, handouts, a transect walk, and demonstrations.

Based on the initial survey conducted at the school, topics covered will include but not be limited to sensitizing the community against open defecation and empowering them to properly operate and maintain their new water and sanitation facilities.

Plans: Rainwater Catchment Tank

A 30,000-liter rainwater catchment tank will be constructed on school grounds. Teachers, students, and parents will gather the materials needed for this project, including sand, ballast, bricks, and hardcore. This contribution will fuel a sense of responsibility for the school and community to take care of their new facilities. Once materials are mobilized, the WEWASAFO team will arrive to lead the construction effort.

Plans: VIP Latrines

Two triple-door latrines will be constructed, providing three new latrines for each gender. Latrine materials will be mobilized the same way as the tank, ensuring the school feels these facilities are truly theirs.

Plans: Hand-Washing Stations

Two hand-washing stations will be delivered to the school before training. These come in the form of two 60-liter containers fitted with a tap. The training facilitator will demonstrate how to properly wash hands, and then students will have a chance to practice in groups. The CTC club will be responsible for filling the hand-washing containers on a daily basis.

With the challenges being faced by pupils in the school, this project is ideal. The students will soon be able to collect and store a lot of rain water with the 30,000 liter tank, especially entering the rainy season. The tank will serve as a good, safe storage facility for the pupils. The girls will also have an additional three latrines, as will the boys. With the enthusiasm that we were welcomed with, it is obvious this school will be delighted to have these new facilities. The school administration is also willing to meet their end of the bargain, hosting training, mobilizing students and staff, notifying parents; we have no doubt this project will be a success.

Project Updates


12/14/2017: A Year Later: Cheptulu Primary School

A year ago, generous donors helped build a rainwater catchment system and new latrines for Cheptulu Primary School. Because of these gifts and our monthly donors, partners can visit project sites throughout the year, strengthening relationships with communities and evaluating the actual water project. These consistent visits allow us to learn vital lessons and hear amazing stories – we’re excited to share this one from partner Janet Kayi, with you.


The Water Project : 4607_yar_1


Project Photos


Project Type

Rainwater Catchment

Rainwater is collected off strategic areas of a roof, enters a custom guttering system (which filters out debris) and leads to a storage tank. Tanks can vary in sizes and are determined by population and average rainfall patterns. Water can be stored for months, is easily treated in the tank, and is accessible through taps. These projects are implemented at schools with proper roof lines and gutter systems to make them successful.


A Year Later: Cheptulu Primary School

October, 2017

“Performance of the pupils has greatly improved,” says headteacher Wycliff Isatia, “and no absenteeism due to water borne diseases which used to affect the pupils. Proper hygiene is being practiced.”

Keeping The Water Promise

There's an incredible community of monthly donors who have come alongside you in supporting clean water in Cheptulu Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project.

This giving community supports ongoing sustainability programs that help Cheptulu Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project maintain access to safe, reliable water. Together, they keep The Water Promise.

We’re confident you'll love joining this world-changing group committed to sustainability!

Give Monthly

A year ago, generous donors helped build a rainwater catchment system and new latrines for Cheptulu Primary School. Because of these gifts and our monthly donors, partners can visit project sites throughout the year, strengthening relationships with communities and evaluating the actual water project. These consistent visits allow us to learn vital lessons and hear amazing stories – we’re excited to share this one from partner Janet Kayi, with you.

The results of the water project and training were evident in a number of aspects immediately as you enter the gate of school: good hygiene is practiced, the compound is very clean, pupils are seen washing hands after visiting toilets as they run back to continue with their lessons and hand washing facilities are placed at a strategic points where pupils are able to access them.

4607_YAR_2

“Performance of the pupils has greatly improved,” says headteacher Wycliff Isatia, “and no absenteeism due to water borne diseases which used to affect the pupils. Proper hygiene is being practiced within the school. That is evident in the school and it has become a routine by pupils who wash hands before going back to class after visiting the toilet.”

4607_YAR_3

“Cheptulu Primary School’s population is increasing day after day because of good performance and the WASH facilities in school. Considering the school is located along Chavakali – Kapsabet road, the facilities can be seen so easily, attracting parents to bring their children in the school. As we speak, the school enrollment has increased,” he notes.

Derrick Muyanzi, a 14-year-old student at the school talks about the benefits of the water project: “The rain water harvesting tank has helped us to access clean, safe drinking water in the school compound and now we can use it for cleaning our classrooms and toilets, too. Also, our performance is improving gradually. Recently, we were ranked as one of the best school in the county (Vihiga County).”

4607_YAR_4

You can feel the gratefulness from both the teachers and pupils for the support given to them and the change it has brought in the school. Generally, there is excitement in the school over the new facilities. Due to population increase in the school, there could be more hand washing stations, so we will help and ask the institution to create leaky tins to serve the pupils and the teachers. This will be done and monitored during our regular monitoring and evaluation schedule.

4607_YAR_5

The Water Project and our partners are committed to consistent monitoring of each water source. Our monitoring and evaluation program, made possible by monthly donors, allows us to visit communities up to four times a year. Read more about our program and how you can help.


Navigating through intense dry spells, performing preventative maintenance, conducting quality repairs when needed and continuing to assist community leaders to manage water points are all normal parts of keeping projects sustainable. The Water Promise community supports ongoing sustainability programs that help Cheptulu Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project maintain access to safe, reliable water.

We’d love for you to join this world-changing group committed to sustainability.

The most impactful way to continue your support of Cheptulu Primary School Rainwater Catchment Project – and hundreds of other places just like this – is by joining our community of monthly givers.

Your monthly giving will help provide clean water, every month... keeping The Water Promise!

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Contributors

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