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The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  Mr David Amuhaya
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  Travilian Muyega And Edwin Amuhaya
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  Travilian Muyega
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  Finished Tank
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  Finished Tank
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  Finished Tank
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  Finished Latrines
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  Finished Latrines
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  Finished Latrines
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  Latrines
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  Latrines
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  Dome Construction
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  Guttering
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  Construction
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  Construction
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  Construction
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  Measuring The Diameter
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  Wire Lining
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  Cement
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  Training
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  Training
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  Training
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  Training
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  Training
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  Training
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  Training
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  Full Latrines
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  Girls Latrines
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  School Kitchen
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  Classrooms
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  School Compound
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  Girls Who Fetch Water
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  At The Spring
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  At The Spring
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  Staff Latrines
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  Water Containers
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  Taking Turns
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  Village Elder
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  Community Children At Spring
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  Community Girl At Spring
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  Walk For Water
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  Walk For Water
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  Walk For Water
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  Meeting With Headteacher
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  Weekly School Program
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  School Motto
The Water Project: Shipala Primary School -  School Entrance

Project Status



Project Type:  Rainwater Catchment

Regional Program: Western Kenya WaSH Program

Impact: 500 Served

Project Phase:  In Service - Apr 2017

Functionality Status:  Functional

Last Checkup: 06/13/2019

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



Community Profile

This project is a part of our shared program with Western Water And Sanitation Forum (WEWASAFO). Our team is pleased to directly share the below report from Kenya (edited for clarity, as needed):

Welcome to the School

638 students attend Shipala Primary School, most who wake up extremely early to get there on time for class. The upper primary classes need to get there for morning exercises at 6:30. A half hour later, these students are sent to fetch water for cleaning and cooking. If they get back late for normal classes at 8AM, they are punished. After lunch, students return for afternoon classes until sports and games that go for another hour until 4PM, when they are sent home to do homework and prepare for the next day.

Shipala Primary School employs 20 teachers and three support staff. The headmistress was the one who called us and applied for a project. She had seen the work done at Cheptulu Primary School and was very impressed, so we paid her and her school a visit to assess the need.

(Editor’s Note: While this many people may have access on any given day, realistically a single water source can only support a population of 350-500 people.  This community would be a good candidate for a second project in the future so adequate water is available. To learn more, click here.)

Water Situation

The school has no water source on campus, so when students are sent to fetch water, they must walk to the nearest spring. This spring is protected, but the construction is old and needs repair. There are cracks in the walls and floor, and the area behind the spring has most likely been walked over. This spring is in a neighboring community, and students must defer to the local community members who are already waiting in line. Sometimes, they wait a long time and have no choice but to be late for class. We met a village elder who described these issues that occur at Musamalia Spring on a daily basis.

To avoid having to go fetch water after morning exercises, some of the students opt to carry water all the way from home. Once water is returned to school, it is poured from students’ small plastic containers into large storage barrels.

After drinking this water during the school day, waterborne disease affects both students and teachers. Diarrhea is the most common symptom, which weakens young students to the point they must stay home. Typhoid is also a common reason students are absent from class.

Sanitation Situation

There are 11 pit latrines on school grounds, all made of brick walls and iron sheets for roofs. Six of them are in good condition, while the other five are almost full. There were two others, but these are entirely full and cannot be used. Some latrines are even missing doors!

There are three hand-washing stations, but since the school doesn’t have its own water source, filling these are put on hold unless there’s leftover water after cleaning, cooking and drinking. Either way, there wasn’t any soap or ash to scrub with.

Teachers, the headmistress, and the students are all ready to attend training on hygiene and sanitation.

Plans: Hygiene and Sanitation Training and Hand-Washing Stations

Training will be held for two days. The facilitator will use PHAST (participatory hygiene and sanitation transformation), ABCD (asset-based community development), CTC (child to child), lectures, group discussions, and handouts to teach health topics and ways to promote good practices within the school. The CTC method will prepare students to lead other students into healthy habits, as well as kickstart a CTC club for the school. This CTC club will oversee the new facilities, such as hand-washing stations, and make sure they are kept clean and in working condition. The two hand-washing stations will be delivered to the school, and the club will fill them with water on a daily basis and make sure there is always a cleaning agent such as soap or ash.

Plans: VIP Latrines

Two triple-door latrines will be constructed with local materials that the school will help gather. Three doors will be given to girls, while the other three will be given to the boys.

Plans: Rainwater Catchment Tank

A 50,000-liter rainwater catchment tank will alleviate the water crisis at this school. The school will help gather the needed construction materials such as sand, rocks, and water for mixing cement. Once finished, this tank can begin catching rainfall that will be used by the school’s students and staff. Students will no longer have to leave their school in search of water!

We’re excited for this project to become a reality for students and staff so that they can focus on education. Girls won’t miss class fetching water for their peers. Clean water will improve health here, freeing students from the waterborne diseases that would keep them at home.

Project Updates


09/26/2018: A Year Later: Shipala Primary School

A year ago, generous donors helped construct a rainwater catchment tank for Shipala Primary School in Kenya. The contributions of incredible monthly donors and others giving directly to The Water Promise allow teams to visit project sites throughout the year, strengthening relationships with communities and evaluating the water project over time. These consistent visits allow us to learn vital lessons and hear amazing stories. Read more…


The Water Project : kenya4636-fetching-water


Project Photos


Project Type

Rainwater Catchment

Rainwater is collected off strategic areas of a roof, enters a custom guttering system (which filters out debris) and leads to a storage tank. Tanks can vary in sizes and are determined by population and average rainfall patterns. Water can be stored for months, is easily treated in the tank, and is accessible through taps. These projects are implemented at schools with proper roof lines and gutter systems to make them successful.


A Year Later: Shipala Primary School

September, 2018

The regular availability of water means that students like 8-year-old Travilian Muyega can wash their hands after using the bathroom, every time.

Keeping The Water Promise

There's an incredible community of monthly donors who have come alongside you in supporting clean water in Shipala Primary School.

This giving community supports ongoing sustainability programs that help Shipala Primary School maintain access to safe, reliable water. Together, they keep The Water Promise.

We’re confident you'll love joining this world-changing group committed to sustainability!

Give Monthly

A year ago, generous donors helped construct a rainwater catchment tank for Shipala Primary School in Kenya. The contributions of incredible monthly donors and others giving directly to The Water Promise allow teams to visit project sites throughout the year, strengthening relationships with communities and evaluating the water project over time. These consistent visits allow us to learn vital lessons and hear amazing stories – and we’re excited to share this one from Janet Kayi with you.


Life for these students has significantly improved over the past year and this is as a result of the water project. The pupils now access clean and safe water for drinking from the tank that is treated with chlorine. As a result, the student population grew by 32 students this school year.

“The Water Project has turned around things for the better,” deputy headteacher Edwin Amuhaya said.

“Before the tank, a lot of time was wasted searching for water during the day. Pupils were always out of classes to get water which used to interfere with class lessons. It is no longer a problem, nor are the waterborne diseases that used to affect the children after drinking contaminated water.”

Travilian Muyega and Edwin Amuhaya

The water tank, VIP latrines, and handwashing facilities within the compound have brought tremendous changes in the school. Everywhere is neat and even; classrooms that used to look so disorganized are now so tidy. Pupils are well-kept because the availability of enough water and sanitation facilities has made it easy for them to exercise good hygiene.

They now have an adequate supply of water for cleaning and cooking their meals. Moreover, they are able to their wash their hands properly after visiting the toilet by using the handwashing facilities installed in the school.

Construction of the tank is only one step along the journey toward sustainable access to clean water. The Water Project is committed to consistent monitoring of each water source. Our monitoring and evaluation program, made possible by donors like you, allows us to maintain our relationships with communities by visiting up to 4 times each year to ensure that the water points are safe and reliable.

Travilian Muyega

This is just one of the many ways that we monitor projects and communicate with you. Additionally, you can always check the functionality status and our project map to see how all of our water points are performing, based on our consistent monitoring data.

One project is just a drop in the bucket towards ending the global water crisis, but the ripple effects of this project are truly astounding. This tank in Shipala Primary School is changing many lives.

This is only possible because of the web of support and trust built between The Water Project, our local teams, the community, and you. We are excited to stay in touch with this community and support their journey with safe water.

Read more about The Water Promise and how you can help.


Navigating through intense dry spells, performing preventative maintenance, conducting quality repairs when needed and continuing to assist community leaders to manage water points are all normal parts of keeping projects sustainable. The Water Promise community supports ongoing sustainability programs that help Shipala Primary School maintain access to safe, reliable water.

We’d love for you to join this world-changing group committed to sustainability.

The most impactful way to continue your support of Shipala Primary School – and hundreds of other places just like this – is by joining our community of monthly givers.

Your monthly giving will help provide clean water, every month... keeping The Water Promise!

Give Monthly


Contributors

Morgan Brevard Water Challenge
New Hope Baptist Church
Kenneth & Maureen P. Gray
Richard & Jessica Hermosillo
Fishing Creek Baptist Church
Bud Godreau and Lynn Wadley's Grandchildren
The Lyon Family
Unity by the Bay Church
Henry and Joan Katz Philanthropic Fund
Dinius Family
In the Names of Janie Kirkpatrick, Gene Johnson, & Janet Johnson
Lebanon United Methodist Church Staff
Patty LaRoche
Second Grade Team
The Cox Family
John and Lorna Lawrence
Marilyn Fong
96 individual donor(s)