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The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Geoffrey Anai
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Posing With Tank
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Scolastica Luvusi
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Mr Enos Kagali School Headteacher
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Finished Latrines
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Finished Latrines
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Finished Latrines
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Finished Tank
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Finished Tank
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Finished Tank
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Construction
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Construction
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Construction
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Construction
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Construction
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Construction
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Construction
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Construction
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Construction
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Construction
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Construction
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Construction
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Construction
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Construction
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Construction
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Headteacher Supervises Work
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Rains Delayed Construction
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Collecting Construction Water
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Parent Fetches Construction Water
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Truck Delivering Materials
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Mr Partrick Khanyanji
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Principal Addressing Students
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Health Club President Demonstrates How To Wash Hands
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Wash President Addresses Participants After Elections
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Training
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Training
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Training
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Training
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Training
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Training
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Training
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Training
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Training
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Training
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Training
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Solar Disinfecting
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Trainer Erick Wagaka Demonstrating Water Treatment
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Local Brickmaking
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Rispa Takes Maize To Grind After School
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Trash Pit
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Teachers Latrine
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Shared Dish Rack
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Inside A Latrine
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Shared Latrines
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Primary Students Pass Through
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Mr Shunza
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Principal Enos Kagali
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Student Lucy Mutambe
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  School Farm
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Staffroom
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Classrooms
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Students
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Water Containers
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Water From Home
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Josephine And Angella Fetch Water From Wandezwa Spring
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Wamu Stream Water Source
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  School Entrance
The Water Project: Bumuyange Secondary School -  Fetching Water Before Classes

Project Status



Project Type:  Rainwater Catchment

Regional Program: Western Kenya WaSH Program

Impact: 101 Served

Project Phase:  In Service - May 2017

Functionality Status:  Functional

Last Checkup: 04/22/2019

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



Community Profile

This project is a part of our shared program with Western Water And Sanitation Forum (WEWASAFO). Our team is pleased to directly share the below report from Kenya (edited for clarity, as needed):

Welcome to the School

Every hour of the day at Bumuyange Secondary School has been planned out to maximize time. Students arrive at school by 6:45AM with water they’ve carried from home in jerrycans, then get straight to daily cleaning. Girls sweep classrooms and the office as boys collect litter around the compound. Classes begin at 7AM half of the week, while the other days begin with morning announcements.

Students have a 10 minute break midmorning for snacks and bathroom. Later when they break for lunch, students eat a mixture of maize and beans that is prepared and served at the primary school. Some students complain that having the same meal everyday is boring, but the school cannot afford any other kind of meal at the moment. Afternoon lessons stretch until 4PM when students break for various activities depending on the day of the week. Practice for games like football and netball are done every Monday and Wednesday, Christian Union is held every Tuesday, guidance and counseling is done on Thursdays, and every Friday evening is set aside for girls to mop all rooms in the school while boys slash (clear brush from) the compound.

Water Situation

Since the school doesn’t have its own water source, students are asked to carry water from home on a daily basis.

Teachers often release students early because going to the springs, streams and rivers is very dangerous for students, especially girls, who may be harassed sexually. This is why the school does not have evening study classes, yet they still have to compete with students from other schools that attend both morning and evening preps.

Those who fetch water from the stream and river submerge their jerrycans until they’re full. There are other students who make the trip to the protected spring in the area, which is the safest option. There are others who say they leave their buckets right under the water flowing from iron sheets or gutters at their homes. Another student, Annete, said her uncle has tapped water, so her family just borrows it on a daily basis.

But there’s no way for teachers to keep track of where water comes from each day. There was an outbreak of typhoid a little while ago, and it was attributed to the use of contaminated water. Even now, some students complain of diarrhea and have to seek treatment before resuming studies.

There is no water storage on school grounds, so water is kept in the students’ jerrycans until it is used. None of these containers have covers, so the water inside is open to contamination throughout the day.

Sanitation Situation

The secondary school has no latrines of its own. Instead, the primary section is lending two of its latrines to the older girls. They boys and teachers must share the rest of the latrines with the small students.

The primary students normally work with their teachers to clean the latrines every morning, but they are filthy from overuse by the end of the day. One of the students described that “the latrines are old with no shutters, therefore we have to struggle to hold the door as we ease ourselves.”

Lack of latrines has forced the school to make several adjustments; they already altered their schedule so that congestion at the primary school latrines would not be an overwhelming issue. When the secondary boys would rush to get to the primary latrines first, sometimes the younger boys would show up and demand to go first since the facilities are “theirs.”

Neither are there hand-washing stations for after using the latrine or before eating. Rubbish is thrown on the ground behind classes, and the wind blows it around.

Teacher Shunza said that sharing facilities like the kitchen and latrines with the primary school is a hard thing to do. “We do not love our state, especially old, worn out latrines, neither do we love seeing our children carry water from home. This has even driven other children from this area to go to better schools like Lusengeli, that is at least ahead of us in terms of water and sanitation facilities. We know that our school is at risk of another diarrheal disease outbreak, but we also understand the poor state of our underprivileged parents who either survive on meager daily wages they earn from hard work or from the small profits gotten from businesses. There are homes with no latrines, and I believe it is because of ignorance,” he said.

Plans: Hygiene and Sanitation Training and Hand-Washing Stations

Hygiene and sanitation conditions in this area are poor, and we with the school administration fear that only training the students will not instigate the change needed at home. Therefore, we plan to invite community members to join our hygiene and sanitation sessions.

Principal Enos Kagali said, “I’m happy you will train participants from the community on matters of health and hygiene. Most people live in poor health conditions, we sometimes have to go to homes of our children which are so dirty -which makes me wonder whether it will be easy to control diarrheal diseases if the fight is mounted on the part of the school alone. However much we try in school, the same children will get diseases from home.”

Training will be held for two days. The facilitator will use PHAST (participatory hygiene and sanitation transformation), ABCD (asset-based community development), CTC (child to child), lectures, group discussions, and handouts to teach health topics and ways to promote good practices within the school. The CTC method will prepare students to lead other students into healthy habits, as well as kickstart a CTC club for the school. This CTC club will oversee the new facilities, such as hand-washing stations, and make sure they are kept clean and in working condition.

These hand-washing stations are in the form of 50-liter buckets fitted with taps. These also have metal stands. Two of these stations will be delivered to the school, and the club will fill them with water on a daily basis and make sure there is always a cleaning agent such as soap or ash.

Plans: VIP Latrines

Two triple-door latrines will be constructed with local materials that the school will help gather. Three doors will be given to girls, while the other three will be given to the boys.

This school is already mobilizing for materials like sand, ballast, hardcore, old sugar sacks, and propping poles. Three male parents have already offered to do unskilled labor, and some female parents will fetch water for construction work. These parents accepted to do so after the principal decided to calculate payment for the work they do as school fees for their children.

Plans: Rainwater Catchment Tank

A 50,000-liter rainwater catchment tank will alleviate the water crisis at this school. The school will help gather the needed construction materials such as sand, rocks, and water for mixing cement. Once finished, this tank can begin catching rainfall that will be used by the school’s students and staff. Students will no longer have to leave their school in search of water!

We’re excited for this project to become a reality so that students and staff can focus on education. There will be an adequate source of clean water at Bumuyange Secondary School! We expect that academics will improve as students have more time to stay in class without worrying about water.

Project Updates


08/27/2018: A Year Later: Bumuyange Secondary School

A year ago, generous donors helped build a rainwater catchment tank and latrines for the Bumuyange Secondary School in Western Kenya. The contributions of incredible monthly donors and others giving directly to The Water Promise allow teams to visit project sites throughout the year, strengthening relationships with communities and evaluating the water project over time. These consistent visits allow us to learn vital lessons and hear amazing stories. Read more…


The Water Project : kenya4643-posing-with-tank


Project Photos


Project Type

Rainwater Catchment

Rainwater is collected off strategic areas of a roof, enters a custom guttering system (which filters out debris) and leads to a storage tank. Tanks can vary in sizes and are determined by population and average rainfall patterns. Water can be stored for months, is easily treated in the tank, and is accessible through taps. These projects are implemented at schools with proper roof lines and gutter systems to make them successful.


A Year Later: Bumuyange Secondary School

August, 2018

“We are happy because our students are no longer sharing pit latrines with the primary school kids as it was before.” – Mr. Geoffrey Anaya

Keeping The Water Promise

There's an incredible community of monthly donors who have come alongside you in supporting clean water in Bumuyange Secondary School.

This giving community supports ongoing sustainability programs that help Bumuyange Secondary School maintain access to safe, reliable water. Together, they keep The Water Promise.

We’re confident you'll love joining this world-changing group committed to sustainability!

Give Monthly

A year ago, generous donors helped build a rainwater catchment tank and latrines for the Bumuyange Secondary School in Western Kenya. The contributions of incredible monthly donors and others giving directly to The Water Promise allow teams to visit project sites throughout the year, strengthening relationships with communities and evaluating the water project over time. These consistent visits allow us to learn vital lessons and hear amazing stories – we’re excited to share this one from our partner, Jonathan Mutai, with you.


Stepping into Bumuyange Secondary School, you are welcomed by a clean environment. Corridors and classrooms are very clean, indicating that the hygiene education imparted to students is still in practice. They are so happy to have their own pit latrines on school grounds as opposed to the situation before when they used to share with the primary section.

“Construction of the water tank and pit latrines has made everything at close proximity to us. This has enabled us to attend morning and evening preps with ease, because we no longer have to go and fetch water from the stream for cleaning in the morning or cross over to primary section to re-leaved ourselves, something that used to waist a lot of our precious study time,” Boyphine Andege, a 19 year-old student, said.

“More so, the handwashing facilities in the school have improved hygiene because we do wash our hands after visiting the toilet.”

Scolastica Luvusi

The school greatly appreciate the efforts of The Water Project together with WEWASAFO not only for safe and clean water beside good sanitation facilities in the school but also for making them minimize time wastage. The tank is in a good working condition and the environment looks clean a year later.

Installation of the water tank and latrines is only one step along the journey toward sustainable access to clean water. The Water Project and WEWASAFO (our trusted local partner) are committed to consistent monitoring of each water source. Our monitoring and evaluation program, made possible by donors like you, allows us to maintain our relationships with communities by visiting up to 4 times each year to ensure that the water points are safe and reliable.

This is just one of the many ways that we monitor projects and communicate with you. Additionally, you can always check the functionality status and our project map to see how all of our water points are performing, based on our consistent monitoring data.

One project is just a drop in the bucket towards ending the global water crisis, but the ripple effects of this project are truly astounding. This tank at Bumuyange Secondary School is changing many lives.

“We are happy because our students are no longer sharing pit latrines with the primary school kids as it was before,” Mr. Geoffrey Anaya, the Director of Studies, said.

“Also, the time that students used to waste in fetching water from the nearby stream is now spent on their studies. As a result of the improved facilities, the student population increased by 39 students in the past year.”

This is only possible because of the web of support and trust built between The Water Project, WEWASAFO, the community, and you. We are excited to stay in touch with this community and support their journey with safe water.

Read more about The Water Promise and how you can help.


Navigating through intense dry spells, performing preventative maintenance, conducting quality repairs when needed and continuing to assist community leaders to manage water points are all normal parts of keeping projects sustainable. The Water Promise community supports ongoing sustainability programs that help Bumuyange Secondary School maintain access to safe, reliable water.

We’d love for you to join this world-changing group committed to sustainability.

The most impactful way to continue your support of Bumuyange Secondary School – and hundreds of other places just like this – is by joining our community of monthly givers.

Your monthly giving will help provide clean water, every month... keeping The Water Promise!

Give Monthly


Contributors

Project Sponsor - Imago Dei Community
1 individual donor(s)