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The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -
The Water Project: St Marys Girls High School -

Project Status



Project Type:  Rainwater Catchment

Program: Kenyan Rainwater Harvesting

Impact: 500 Served

Project Phase:  Installed - May 2015

Functionality Status:  Functional

Last Checkup: 04/02/2018

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



Community Profile

This project is being implemented by our partner Western Water And Sanitation Forum, and includes the construction of a rainwater harvesting system and ventilation improved pit (VIP) latrines.

Background Information

St. Mary’s Mumias girls High school is located in Mumias Central Division, Nabongo Location, Ekero ward, Mumias sub- county, Mumias Constituency. The school has a total of thirty eight (38) teachers of which twenty (20) are female, 18 are male, Eleven (11) are BOG and 15 support staff. The school has total number of 860 students including one girl with disability. The population of the school is comprised of students from form one (210), form 2 (208), form 3 (265), form 4 (177). The school is now ranked as one of the best National schools in Kakamega County. This is as a result of devolution that is gradually taking place in Kenya, thus putting pressure on the schools infrastructure/facilities (need for more WASH facilities in the School). The school has a total of 17 classrooms, 24 toilets (day time) for the students and seven (7) toilets for the teachers. The school has nine dormitories and inside there are a number washrooms and bathrooms.

(Editor’s Note: While this many people may have access on any given day, realistically a single water source can only support a population of 350-500 people.  This community would be a good candidate for a second project in the future so adequate water is available. To learn more, click here.)

The school has ten hand washing facilities for students and one for the teachers and support staff.

Justification

The school’s main source of water is a bore hole and 3 plastic tanks with the capacity of 9000 litres. These tanks are not sufficient to serve the high population of the school and also during the dry seasons, there is not enough water to meet the needs of the whole population, teachers and support staff included. As a result, the students are forced to use as little water as possible which may not meet their needs such as drinking, bathing, cleaning and washing. This has lead to a high demand for the construction of a bigger rain water harvesting tank to accommodate the needs of all the school’s population and hence be able to arrest the situation.

The sanitation is a challenge since 32 toilets are not enough considering the population of more than 860 students therefore it is not sufficient to accommodate all the students, resulting in long lines. This has made the school to request the organization (WEWASAFO) to consider them to construct additional toilets so as to meet all the needs of the student.

The students admitted that they always wash their hands after toilet use though they have to queue for long time so as to wash their hands. This results into a lot of time wasted by the students. In most cases, they are late for classes and sometimes being punished for being late in the lessons.

(Editor’s Note:  In the photo captions included on this page, a ‘fundi‘ is a local resident who is working under an apprenticeship to be a skilled mason.)

Project Updates


05/08/2015: St. Marys Girls High School Project Complete

We are excited to report that  the water project at St. Mary’s Girls High School in Kenya is complete! A new rainwater harvesting system and ventilation improved pit latrines have been constructed and the community has received training in sanitation and hygiene. We just posted a set of new pictures of the project while under construction and when completed.

Take a look, and Thank You for your help!


The Water Project : kenya4323-65-completed-tank


03/23/2015: St Marys Girls High School Project Undereway

We are excited to announce that, thanks to your willingness to help, St. Mary’s Girls High School in Kenya will soon have a new source of safe, clean water.  A rainwater harvesting tank and new latrines are being constructed, and the community will receive training in sanitation and hygiene.  Together these resources will go a long way toward stopping the spread of disease in the area, keeping these students busy at work and play.  We just posted an initial report from our partner in the field including information about the school, GPS coordinates, and pictures.

Take a look, and Thank You for your help!


The Water Project : kenya4323-01-students-at-st-marys-girls-high-school


Project Photos


Project Type

Rainwater Catchment

Rainwater is collected off strategic areas of a roof, enters a custom guttering system (which filters out debris) and leads to a storage tank. Tanks can vary in sizes and are determined by population and average rainfall patterns. Water can be stored for months, is easily treated in the tank, and is accessible through taps. These projects are implemented at schools with proper roof lines and gutter systems to make them successful.