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The Water Project: Kathonzweni Community -  Ruth Kiluva Yrs
The Water Project: Kathonzweni Community -  Water Storage Container
The Water Project: Kathonzweni Community -  At The Scoop Hole
The Water Project: Kathonzweni Community -  Carrying Rocks For Dam Construction
The Water Project: Kathonzweni Community -  Carrying Water
The Water Project: Kathonzweni Community -  Carrying Water
The Water Project: Kathonzweni Community -  Clothesline
The Water Project: Kathonzweni Community -  Compound
The Water Project: Kathonzweni Community -  Containers
The Water Project: Kathonzweni Community -  Cooking Area
The Water Project: Kathonzweni Community -  Cooking
The Water Project: Kathonzweni Community -  Fetching Water From Container
The Water Project: Kathonzweni Community -  Filling Container With Water
The Water Project: Kathonzweni Community -  Hanging Clothes On Line
The Water Project: Kathonzweni Community -  Judith Muema
The Water Project: Kathonzweni Community -  Kitchen
The Water Project: Kathonzweni Community -  Kitchen
The Water Project: Kathonzweni Community -  Latrine
The Water Project: Kathonzweni Community -  Lavu Iluve
The Water Project: Kathonzweni Community -  Livestock In Compound
The Water Project: Kathonzweni Community -  Loading Donkey With Water
The Water Project: Kathonzweni Community -  Scoop Hole
The Water Project: Kathonzweni Community -  Water Storage Containers
The Water Project: Kathonzweni Community -  Water Storage In The Compound

Project Status



Project Type:  Sand Dam

Regional Program: Southeastern Kenya WaSH Program

Impact: 337 Served

Project Phase:  Under Construction
Estimated Install Date (?):  12/06/2019

Project Features


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Our main entry point into Kithuiya has been the Kyeni kya Ngungani Self-Help Group, which is comprised of 25 farming households that are working together to address water and food scarcity for the 337 people in their community. We will partner with this group on multiple projects for up to 5 years to improve water access in the region. These members will be our hands and feet in both constructing water projects and spreading the message of good hygiene and sanitation to everyone.

Kyeni kya Ngungani group members are found in a peaceful rural setting which is largely arid and dry with little vegetation cover. Most of the local members live in below average houses made of bricks and mud with the roofs being made of iron sheets or grass. The four main sources of income reported by group members are, small business ownership (16.7%), casual labor (25.0%), formal employment (16.7%), and farming 41.7%.

Access to water is a significant challenge in this community. Though farming was ranked the highest, people reported that the kind of farming that they do is mainly rain-fed because they have no other way to irrigate crops. That means when the rains fail, they have very little to depend on. For those who sell milk it is a similar challenge. They reported that the milk production usually reduces when the rains are bad due to lack of nutrition for the cows.

“Our community lacks a reliable water supply source. This has resulted in community members using water from scoop holes for drinking and cooking, which is not safe for human consumption,” said Judith Muema.

People must walk more than a mile in search of water, prompting some of them to buy donkeys to help in fetching water. In fact, more than half of the group members reported that it takes more than 2 hours to travel to the water source, wait in line, fetch the water, and return home.

The current water source is found in a seasonal river channel which runs dry at certain times of the year. People rely on scoop holes which are open and accessible to wild animals and livestock, exposing them to a wide range of contaminants. The water looks somewhat discolored and is obviously not safe for human consumption. This leaves community members with further struggles in their quest to access water for use at the household level.

What we can do:

Sand Dam

After the community picked the spot, our technical team went in and proved the viability by finding a good foundation of bedrock. Now, our engineers are busy drawing up the blueprints. We estimate the dam will be 35 meters long and 2.9 meters high.

We are unified with this community to address the water shortage. As more sand dams are built, the environment will continue to transform. As the sand dams mature and build up more sand, the water tables will rise. Along with these sand dams, hand-dug wells (check out the hand-dug well being installed next to this dam) will be installed to give locals a good, safe way to access that water.

With these projects, clean water will be brought closer to hundreds of people in Kithuiya, Kenya.

Training

We will hold hygiene and sanitation training sessions with Kyeni kya Ngungani Self-Help Group, which are also open to non-members. These will teach about important hygiene practices and daily habits to establish in the community at the personal and household levels. Taking good care of self and environment will make for a healthy community.

“Due to lack of enough water, the levels of hygiene and sanitation are low as the available water is too little for intensive cleaning activities and is not restricted to basic activities,” said Mrs. Muema.

Most households have latrines, but they are built with unstable mud floors and lack handwashing stations for people to clean their hands after going to the bathroom. There is a need for improvement on compound hygiene, effective water treatment methods, handwashing training, soap making lessons and knowledge of disease transmission routes. The members of this group seem to have little knowledge of hygiene and sanitation. This also exposes them to risks of contracting diseases such as cholera, typhoid, diarrhea, and stomachaches.

Project Updates


10/10/2019: Kathonzweni Community Sand Dam Underway!

People in Kathonzweni community are traveling long distances to drink dirty water that is making them sick. Thanks to your generosity, we’re working to construct a sand dam and much more.

Get to know this community through the narrative and pictures we’ve posted, and read about this water, sanitation and hygiene project. We look forward to reaching out with news of success!


The Water Project : kenya19193-loading-donkey-with-water


Project Photos


Project Type

Sand Dam

Seasonal streams (and the sand they carry) are trapped by dams, replenishing the water table and allowing for adjacent hand-dug wells. Almost completely led by community-supplied sweat and materials, and under the supervision of engineers, dams are strategically placed within those dry river-beds. The next time it rains, flood-waters are trapped.

With a sand dam, this trapped sand begins to hold millions of gallons of rainwater. Soon enough, sand reaches the top of the dam, allowing water to continue downstream – where it meets the next dam. The result? A regional water table is restored.


Contributors

The Jeremiah Project
St. Mary of the Hills Episcopal Parish
New Tiger Baptist Church
Southern Glazer's Wine and Spirits Charitable Fund
Facebook Donations
Aether Beauty
Clear Horizons Early College High School
North Dunedin Baptist Church
Girl Scout Troop 60332
ArtiKen
Oxford Primary School
Livia Noorollah Bat Mitzvah Project
Cracking Cryptocurrency
Carolyn W. & Charles T. Beaird Family Foundation
The Clorox Group
Jonny Blockchain
Medtronic, YourCause, LLC
Faith Chapel
Charities Aid Foundation of America
Liberty Mutual
Wepay
CyberGrants, LLC
Liberty Mutual
CyberGrants, LLC
Liberty Mutual
Mitch Brownlie, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
75 individual donor(s)