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The Water Project: Mido Spring Protection Project -
The Water Project: Mido Spring Protection Project -
The Water Project: Mido Spring Protection Project -
The Water Project: Mido Spring Protection Project -
The Water Project: Mido Spring Protection Project -
The Water Project: Mido Spring Protection Project -
The Water Project: Mido Spring Protection Project -
The Water Project: Mido Spring Protection Project -
The Water Project: Mido Spring Protection Project -
The Water Project: Mido Spring Protection Project -
The Water Project: Mido Spring Protection Project -
The Water Project: Mido Spring Protection Project -
The Water Project: Mido Spring Protection Project -
The Water Project: Mido Spring Protection Project -

Project Status



Project Type:  Protected Spring

Regional Program: Western Kenya WaSH Program

Impact: 500 Served

Project Phase:  Installed - May 2016

Functionality Status:  Functional

Last Checkup: 09/27/2018

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



Community Profile

This project is a part of our shared program with Western Water And Sanitation Forum (WEWASAFO). Our team is pleased to directly share the below report (edited for clarity, as needed).

Background Information

Mido Spring is located in Minyika Village, North Maragoli ward, Sabatia sub-county of Vihiga County. It is inhabited by the Maragoli sub-tribe of the Luhya Community. These people practice small-scale farming, planting a variety of food crops and teas as a cash crop. This spring serves 600 from 60 different households, whose people use water for drinking, household chores, and irrigation during the dry seasons. (Editor’s Note: While this many people may have access on any given day, realistically a single water source can only support a population of 350-500 people. This site would make a great location for a second project. To learn more, click here.)

The Current Source

Mido Spring is open to contamination and thus  predisposes its users to waterborne diseases. “Sometimes, we do sacrifice [time] to get drinking water from a spring in our neighboring village four kilometers away taking us about two hours,” says a local found fetching water at Mido Spring. This time searching for clean water is time lost that could have been used for other more productive activities.

Sanitation Situation

The community around Mido Spring is willing to provide the locally available materials needed for construction and to attend health and hygiene trainings. It was also noted that quite a few homes still do not have pit latrines, and other families are forced to share their sanitation facilities while others reportedly opt for open defecation. This open defication is exposing the entire community to fecal-oral diseases. “My neighbor has lived for decades with no pit latrine,” a community member confides, “we are more than willing to help this household sink a pit and to ensure that it benefits from the sanitation platforms that will be given.”

Solution

Fetching water is predominantly a woman’s role. Protecting the spring will help empower the female by creating more time for them to invest in income-generating activities and education. Moreover, the sanitation facilities and health promotion campaigns implemented through training will enable, enlighten and build the capacity of this community.

Project Results:

Training

Sanitation and hygiene training was held in the home of one of the community members. The spring chairperson organized a group including mend and women who draw water from Mido spring. The group totaled 13 people: 7 men and 6 women.

The facilitator lead the group through a CLTS (Community Lead Total Sanitation) discussion including the following topics:

  • Local diseases and their control
  • Primary healthcare
  • Spring management
  • Fund collection and record keeping
  • Personal and environmental health
  • Community water demand

The training methods included demonstrations, a transect walk, focus group discussions, question and answer sessions, and other discussions. The impact of the training was obvious as most households dug pit latrines and began practicing proper handwashing procedures.

Florence Manono, a local farmer, said, “This project is one of the best blessing that our community has gotten in 2016. We are so humbled to have our spring protected and to benefit from the sanitation platforms donated by TWP.”

Spring Protection

Construction of the spring protection system began early in February. This includes clearing the site and excavating the ground to provide a proper foundation. Concrete and bricks are used to construct the foundation slab, head wall, wing walls, and stairs used to access the spring. Pipes are installed in the head wall to allow the safe spring water to flow out easily. Finally the area around the spring is landscaped to help prevent erosion and contamination, and the catchment area is fenced.

The local community contributed to the project with materials, labor, and food and accommodations for the work crew. They participated in fencing the spring, transporting the materials to the site, monitoring of the spring and in the training of water user committee and community health promoters.

“This protected water point will help us a great deal in fighting waterborne diseases and reduction of time lost to search for alternative drinking water from other sources‑as it was the case before the protection of this spring. We are so thankful to you for the enriching, elaborate and timely training on water preservation.” (Maliki Mido)

Sanitation Platforms

Sanplats are concrete slabs used to create stable floors for pit latrines. Five sanplats were provided for families considered in the greatest need.  Each household dug a pit as recommended by the work crew. Once the platforms were cast out of concrete and put in place, the local community was busy finalizing the superstructures that would provide privacy at the the latrines.

“My family and I are very thankful. The slabs have helped us think positive toward realizing an open defecation free community,” said one of the slab beneficiaries.

The Water Project and the community of Mido Spring thank you for unlocking potential!

Project Updates


11/15/2017: A Year Later: Mido Spring

A year ago, generous donors helped build a spring protection system and sanitation platforms for families living around Mido Spring. Because of these gifts and our monthly donors, partners are able to visit project sites throughout the year, strengthening relationships with communities and evaluating the actual water project. These consistent visits allow us to learn vital lessons and hear amazing stories – we’re excited to share this one with you.


The Water Project : 4555-yar-2


05/19/2016: Mido Spring Protection Project Complete

We are excited to report that the project to protect Mido Spring for the community members who depend on it is complete. The spring is now safe from contamination, the community has been equipped with 5 sanitation platforms, and training in sanitation and hygiene has been given. Imagine the effect all of this will have on the lives of these families. We just updated the project page with the latest details and pictures.

Take a look, and Thank You for caring for the thirsty.


The Water Project : 12-kenya4555-protected-spring


02/17/2016: Mido Spring Protection Project Underway

We are excited to share that work around Mido Spring has begun. Community members have been drinking contaminated water from this spring, and often suffer physical illnesses after doing so. Our partner conducted a survey of the area and deemed it necessary to protect the spring, build new sanitation platforms (safe, easy-to-clean concrete floors for latrines), and conduct sanitation and hygiene training. Thanks to your generosity, waterborne disease will no longer be a challenge for the families drinking the spring’s water. We look forward to sharing more details with you as they come! But for now, please take some time to check out the report containing community information, pictures, and GPS coordinates.

The Water Project and the community of Mido Spring Thank You for giving the hope of clean water and good health.


The Water Project : 2-kenya4555-current-source-copy


Project Photos


Project Type

Protected Spring

In many communities, natural springs exist as water flows from cracks in rocky ground or the side of a hill.  Springs provide reliable water but that doesn’t mean safe. When left open they become contaminated by surface contamination, animal and human waste and rain runoff. The solution is to protect the source. First, you excavate around the exact source area of the spring. Then, you build a protective reservoir for water flow, which leads to a concrete spring box and collection area. Safe water typically flows year-round and there is very limited ongoing maintenance needed!


"This project is one of the best blessing that our community has gotten in 2016."

Florence Manono



Contributors

Diocese of East Carolina
Crunchie Media Ltd
16 individual donor(s)

A Year Later: Mido Spring

September, 2017

“A strong bond has been created among the village dwellers as they come together to clean the water point and discuss matters concerning their highly valued spring.”

A year ago, generous donors helped build a spring protection system and sanitation platforms for families living around Mido Spring. Because of these gifts and our monthly donors, partners are able to visit project sites throughout the year, strengthening relationships with communities and evaluating the actual water project. These consistent visits allow us to learn vital lessons and hear amazing stories – we’re excited to share this one with you.

Though clean water is integral to good development, it’s not the only thing that’s causing big changes around Mido Spring; families have heeded what they learned during last year’s training. Madam Florence exemplifies this change for the better. Florence took up the gauntlet 4555 YAR 1after our session on economic empowerment and started vending vegetables. She started this business with only 100 shillings (about 1USD), but is now making more than enough to pay for her grandchildren’s school fees.

The clean water flowing from Mido Spring has given Florence the opportunity to embrace income-generating activities that bring her family success. She told us “Protection of Mido Spring was indeed a blessing to this community. Almost all compounds… are tidy with compost pits and clotheslines and dish racks in each. A strong bond has been created among the village dwellers as they come together to clean the water point and discuss matters concerning their highly valued spring.”

We also met little Bennon Adagala at the spring. He says this clean water is giving him so much peace that he never used to have – He frequently suffered from stomach pains and diarrhea because of dirty water. “Now I can have my sound sleep and give maximum attention to my studies and chores because construction marked the end of diarrhea in my life.” He also mentioned that he has a rainwater catchment tank at his school, so he gets to drink clean water all day. He’s noticed his classmates are no longer absent as much as they used to be!

In fact, a staff member was so moved by Bennon’s zeal for learning that they bought him enough paraffin to get him through two months of homework! This community is impoverished and struggles to find the same success Florence has, so we are continuing to engage with them and encourage them with different ideas for generating income. Keeping Mido Spring flowing with clean water is just another way to support them in these endeavors, and we’re excited to stay in relationship with this community as they continue their journeys with clean water.

The Water Project and our partners are committed to consistent monitoring of each water source. Our monitoring and evaluation program, made possible by monthly donors, allows us to visit communities up to four times a year. Read more about our program and how you can help.