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The Water Project: Itukhula Community -  Clean Water
The Water Project: Itukhula Community -  Clean Water
The Water Project: Itukhula Community -  Clean Water
The Water Project: Itukhula Community -  Clean Water
The Water Project: Itukhula Community -  Sanitation Platform
The Water Project: Itukhula Community -  Sanitation Platform
The Water Project: Itukhula Community -  Sanitation Platform
The Water Project: Itukhula Community -  Sanitation Platform
The Water Project: Itukhula Community -  Training
The Water Project: Itukhula Community -  Training
The Water Project: Itukhula Community -  Training
The Water Project: Itukhula Community -  Training
The Water Project: Itukhula Community -  Handwashing Training
The Water Project: Itukhula Community -  Latrine
The Water Project: Itukhula Community -  Latrine
The Water Project: Itukhula Community -  Household
The Water Project: Itukhula Community -  Household
The Water Project: Itukhula Community -  Household
The Water Project: Itukhula Community -  Truphose At Her Home
The Water Project: Itukhula Community -  Farm
The Water Project: Itukhula Community -  Carrying Water
The Water Project: Itukhula Community -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Itukhula Community -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Itukhula Community -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Itukhula Community -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Itukhula Community -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Itukhula Community -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Itukhula Community -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Itukhula Community -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Itukhula Community -  Coming To Fetch Water
The Water Project: Itukhula Community -  Coming To Fetch Water
The Water Project: Itukhula Community -  Spring
The Water Project: Itukhula Community -  Lipala Spring

Project Status



Project Type:  Protected Spring

Regional Program: Western Kenya WaSH Program

Impact: 245 Served

Project Phase:  Installed - May 2018

Functionality Status:  Functional

Last Checkup: 07/06/2018

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



Community Profile

This project is a part of our shared program with Western Water And Sanitation Forum (WEWASAFO). Our team is pleased to directly share the below report (edited for clarity, as needed).

Welcome to the Community

In Itukhula, women and children wake up very early to go fetch water before they do anything else. This is used for breakfast and morning chores. Then, adults go to the farm while others go to the market to sell their goods. Children carry some of the leftover water with them to school.

Women must take a break from the farm to have lunch ready by 12pm. Schools don’t provide lunch, so students walk back home to join their mothers. After lunch, some adults go back to the farm while others end their days early. Days come to a close fairly quickly after dinner, for everyone has worked hard and needs rest.

Water Situation

Women and children are those responsible for finding enough water for cooking, drinking, and cleaning. They walk a path to Lipala Spring, jerrycan and cup in hand. They dunk their jerrycans under the pool of water to get it as full as possible, and then fill the remainder with the smaller cups. A closer look, and you can see leaves and other things floating in the water. When the water just doesn’t look clear enough for drinking, women will make the walk of over two kilometers to get water from protected springs.

This spring is ideal for protection because of the high population living around it – it has hundreds of beneficiaries, including students from nearby Madivini Primary School.

Sanitation Situation

A majority of the residents neighboring Lipala Spring do not have standard latrines. Only a few of them have improvised, simple pit latrines, and they’re poorly managed. Some people practice open defection, while others share sanitation facilities because it’s more convenient for them. It will be effective to address this issue by explaining how feces are spread around the community many different ways. It is important to dispose of waste properly!

Bathing shelters, dish racks and compost pits were hard to come by. Homes that have no kitchens have resorted to cooking outside, exposing their food to contaminants.

There are no hand-washing stations.

Plans: Hygiene and Sanitation Training

Community members will attend hygiene and sanitation training for at least two days. This training will ensure participants have the knowledge they need about healthy practices and their importance. The facilitator plans to use PHAST (Participatory Hygiene and Sanitation Transformation), CLTS (Community-Led Total Sanitation), ABCD (Asset-Based Community Development), group discussions, handouts, and demonstrations at the spring. One of the most important topics we plan to cover is open defecation and its dangers, as well as having and using a pit latrine.

Training will also result in the formation of a committee that will oversee operations and maintenance at the spring. They will enforce proper behavior around the spring and delegate tasks that will help preserve the site, such as building a fence and digging proper drainage. The fence will keep out destructive animals, and the drainage will keep the area’s mosquito population at a minimum.

Plans: Sanitation Platforms

On the final day of training, participants will select five families that should benefit from new latrine floors.

Training will also inform the community and selected families on what they need to contribute to make this project a success. They must mobilize locally available materials, such as bricks, clean sand, hardcore, and ballast. The five families chosen for sanitation platforms must prepare by sinking a pit for the sanitation platforms to be placed over. All community members must work together to make sure that accommodations and food are always provided for the work teams.

Plans: Spring Protection

Protecting the spring will ensure that the water is safe, adequate and secure. Construction will keep surface runoff and other contaminants out of the water. With the community’s high involvement in the process, there should be a good sense of responsibility and ownership for the new clean water source.

Fetching water is predominantly a female role, done by both women and young girls. Protecting the spring and offering training and support will therefore help empower the female members of the community by giving them more time and efforts to engage and invest in income-generating activities.

Project Updates


05/25/2018: Itukhula Community Project Complete

Itukhula Community now has clean water! Lipala Spring has been transformed into a flowing source of clean water thanks to your donation. The spring is protected from contamination, five sanitation platforms have been provided for the community, and training has been done on sanitation and hygiene.

Knowledge is Power

During our supervision of ongoing work at nearby Madivini Primary School, we swung by Itukhula Community to see if the local materials like sand and stones had been gathered by community members and delivered to the spring site. We found many community members already at Lipala Spring. We discussed our plans to offer a hygiene and sanitation training, and they responded with great interest. We agreed on the dates together so that it wouldn’t interfere with anything else going on in their village. We met together at a household close to the spring, and attendance was as expected.

The field officer clearly communicated the areas of needed improvement for Itukhula, which included the following topics and more:

– Handwashing and personal hygiene

– Handling water and food hygienically

– Safe waste disposal

– Water treatment

By the end of training, a water user committee and a community health volunteer group were formed. The training was a success because the formed committees chose their respective leaders and promised to start work as soon as possible. They’ll be encouraging good water, hygiene, and sanitation practices within their community.

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Mrs. Jane Oseta is a business-minded woman who sells the extra vegetables she picks from her garden. She is now part of the water user committee that oversees and cares for their new clean water point.

“Indeed knowledge is power,” she said. “If we had the information you have passed to us today, we would not have wasted our resources on treating waterborne diseases, which are preventable!”

Sanitation Platforms

All five sanitation platforms have been installed. These five families are happy about this milestone of having a private latrine of their own and are optimistic that people will no longer leave waste outdoors. We are continuing to encourage families to finish building walls and roofs over their new latrine floors.

Spring Protection

Note: There was an issue with an SD card in the field, and we are not able to provide pictures of the construction process. If you wish to see pictures that of what is happening in the steps outlined below, check out the protections in Shikoti Community or Shilakaya Community.

Community members provided all locally available construction materials, e.g bricks, wheelbarrows of clean sand, wheelbarrows of ballast, fencing poles and gravel. Accommodations and meals were provided for the artisan, too. Men and women lent their strength to the artisan to help him with manual labor.

The spring area was excavated to create space for setting the foundation of polyethylene, wire mesh and concrete. After the base had been set, both wing walls and the headwall were set in place using brickwork. The discharge pipe was fixed low in place through the headwall to direct the water from the reservoir to the drawing area.

As the wing walls and headwall were curing, the stairs were set and the tiles were fixed directly below the discharge pipe. This reduces the erosive force of the falling water and beautifies the spring. The process of plastering the headwall and wing walls on both sides reinforces the brickwork and prevents water from the reservoir from seeping through the walls and allows pressure to build in the collection box to push water up through the discharge pipe.

The source area was filled up with clean hardcore and covered with a polyethylene membrane to eliminate any potential sources of contamination. The community had to wait for two weeks before using the spring so that the concrete could thoroughly dry. We scheduled a day when we would return to hand this water source over for the community to use.

The spring had to cure, which means someone had to visit every day to moisten the concrete. This ensured that it dried at a pace that wouldn’t result in cracks.

“The source is now discharging very clean and safe drinking water that can be consumed at any time without the need of boiling or treating it. It’s not the same, as we used to consider water fetched early in the morning only safe for drinking since later in the day there was open defecation that exposed the water to all kinds of contamination. We are grateful for you considering our spring for protection,” Mr. Raphael Shitukhu said.


The Water Project : 12-kenya18086-clean-water


02/23/2018: Itukhula Community Project Underway

Itukhula Community will soon have a clean, safe source of water thanks to your donation! Community members have been drinking contaminated water from Lipala Spring, and contend with the consequences on a daily basis. Our partner conducted a survey of the area and deemed it necessary to protect the spring, build new sanitation platforms (safe, easy-to-clean concrete floors for latrines), and conduct sanitation and hygiene training.

Thanks to your generosity, waterborne disease will no longer be a challenge for the families here. Please take some time to get to know your community through the narrative and pictures posted to this page. We look forward to reaching out again with good news!


The Water Project : 6-kenya18086-fetching-water


Project Photos


Project Type

Protected Spring

In many communities, natural springs exist as water flows from cracks in rocky ground or the side of a hill.  Springs provide reliable water but that doesn’t mean safe. When left open they become contaminated by surface contamination, animal and human waste and rain runoff. The solution is to protect the source. First, you excavate around the exact source area of the spring. Then, you build a protective reservoir for water flow, which leads to a concrete spring box and collection area. Safe water typically flows year-round and there is very limited ongoing maintenance needed!



Contributors

First Light Asset Management