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The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 2 -  Young Woman Pounding Rice
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 2 -  Young Girl Doing Petty Trading
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 2 -  Water Storage
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 2 -  Water Storage
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 2 -  Palm Kernel Farm
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 2 -  Palm Kernel
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 2 -  Outdoor Kitchen
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 2 -  Motor Bike Transportation
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 2 -  Mosque
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 2 -  Momudu Bangura
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 2 -  Main Water Source
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 2 -  Latrine
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 2 -  Latrine
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 2 -  Sorting Groundnuts
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 2 -  Inside Mosque
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 2 -  Inside Latrine
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 2 -  Ibrahim Dubumya
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 2 -  Household
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 2 -  Household
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 2 -  Girl Selling Bread
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 2 -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 2 -  Dishrack
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 2 -  Clothesline
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 2 -  Carrying Water
The Water Project: Kamasondo, Bross 2 -  Carrying Water

Project Status



Project Type:  Borehole Well and Hand Pump

Regional Program: Port Loko, Sierra Leone WaSH Program

Project Phase:  Donate to this Project
Estimated Install Date (?):  12/31/2021

Project Features


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A hunter founded Bross village, given its name by the people who settled there. Bross means ashes in the Temne language, a reference to the hunter’s fire to smoke their meat. After some time, the settlement expanded into two villages bearing the same name. People eventually left the first Bross village and settled in what is now called Bross 2 Village. The 250 people here make a living through farming, petty trading, and fishing. The other main livelihood that is quickly contributing to deforestation of the land here is charcoal production. The community has cut down large trees that were over a hundred years old in order to turn them into charcoal for sale.

The primary water source for this community is an open swamp, sometimes referred to as stream, that is contaminated. The fertilizer by-products from the nearby swampland add to the contamination of the water. There are tree branches, leaves, frogs, tadpoles, and fish in the water. There is mildew and a brown skim on top of the water that ends up in people’s stomachs. For so many years, the community has been using this same source, generation after generation.

According to the community, typhoid, malaria, dysentery, diarrhea, worms, and parasites are all health consequences of drinking this water. They know about the dangers of drinking water from the stream, but, left with no other option, they consume it.

The swamp is located far from the village, and it is affected by the dry season, which reduces the water’s availability. The footpath leading to the swamp is a significant concern for parents, as day after day their children travel this dangerous road in search of water. When going to the swamp, children usually sing along the way, hoping that any animal hearing their voices will quickly run away. It is a technique taught to children from an early age on how to survive in the village.

Field Officer Mohamed Turay shared the following story from his recent visit with the community:

To avoid multiple trips, the people fetching the water will use larger containers. I saw a child of no more than ten years with a large bucket of water on her head. I looked at the top of her head and noticed a patch of hair missing. Whenever in the village, overworked children have a symbol on their heads. The emblem is a missing patch of hair from the repeated carrying of heavy containers on the head.

Not every child in a village can afford to wear shoes, so shoe wearing is reserved for trips to school or other communities. On most trips to anywhere else – either the farm or community stream – there are no shoes worn. I looked at the children’s toes that escorted the team to the stream, and I immediately noticed several missing toenails. Seeing my look, the little girl responded without me asking.

“I stubbed my toes while coming from the farm,” she said.

She stubbed her toes so hard that the toenail was removed instantly. She said after it happened, all the water was wasted with no damage to the container. From her explanation, she was more worried about the container than her health. The next thing she said brought tears to my eyes.

“I went back to the stream to get more water because I dare not return without any water. My mother has shown me what to do in an emergency. I plucked a specific type of leaf, chewed it and put it on my toe, and tied it with a piece of dirty cloth that I use to cushion my head when carrying a heavy load,” she said.

I realized this child is over-worked.

We laker spoke with Ibrahim Dumbuya, a 58-year-old farmer, about the water situation in the community. He lamented the impact of the crisis on his grandchildren.

“Day in and day out, I sit and watch our children suffer the same treatment I received while growing up. I survived, but who knows if my grandchildren will survive through such hardship? Fetching water is the responsibility of the entire household, and I know that my grandchildren are overworked, but what else can we do with no water anywhere near the village?” he said.

What we can do:

New Well

We will be drilling is centrally located and will relieve many people of the long journey to fetch water. This project will ease the people here of their water challenges.

Our team will drive over the LS200 mud rotary drill rig and set up camp for a couple of nights. Once the well is drilled to a sufficient water column, it will be cased, developed, and then tested. If these tests are positive, our mechanics will install a new India Mark II pump.

This community has been pushed to open contaminated well for their water. By drilling this borehole, Bross Village will be provided with plenty of accessible clean drinking water.

Training

There will be hygiene and sanitation training sessions offered for three days in a row.

Community members will learn how to make a hands-free handwashing station called the “tippy-tap.” We will use these tippy taps for handwashing demonstrations and will also teach about other tools like dish racks and the importance of properly penning in animals. We will highlight the need to keep restrooms clean, among many other topics.

This training will also strengthen a water user committee that will manage and maintain this new well. They will enforce proper behavior and report to us whenever they need our help in solving a serious problem, like a pump breakdown.

We're just getting started, check back soon!


Project Photos


Project Type

Borehole and Hand Pump

Girls and women walk long distances for water when safe water is very often right under their feet! Underground rivers, called aquifers, often contain a constant supply of safe water – but you have to get to it. No matter what machine or piece of equipment is used, all drilling is aiming for a borehole that reaches into an aquifer. If the aquifer has water - and after the well is developed - we are able to pull water to the surface utilizing a hand-pump. If all goes as planned, the community is left with a safe, closed water source providing around 5 gallons of water a minute through a hand-pump.


Contributors