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The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -
The Water Project: #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project -

Project Status



Project Type:  Borehole Well and Hand Pump

Regional Program: Port Loko, Sierra Leone WaSH Program

Impact: 500 Served

Project Phase:  In Service - Sep 2016

Functionality Status:  Functional

Last Checkup: 10/14/2019

Project Features


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Community Profile

Ebola’s Impact

Ebola has been a tragic reality for the people of Sierra Leone over the last two years. Though considered stable at the moment, the country is still very cautious.

Our teams have remained safe and are on the front lines of Ebola prevention through this water, hygiene and sanitation program.  Your support acknowledges and celebrates their selfless work and bravery.

The entire team continues to express their gratitude for your support of communities in Sierra Leone, and we can’t wait to celebrate safe water together!

Please enjoy the following report comes straight from the field, edited for clarity and readability:

Welcome to the Community

Kamara Taylor Street runs through Yongoroo Community, home to 1186 people from approximately 148 different families. (Editor’s Note: While this many people may have access on any given day, realistically a single water source can only support a population of 350-500 people. To learn more, click here.) It is a community largely dependent on fishing, with boys being groomed from an early age to fish. The young girls in every community are raised to be either young brides or taught to sell fish.

A normal day in this community starts at 4 am. Women as well as men begin their day with a dip in the local stream. It is a scene to behold: women, children, and in-laws bathing side by side with no regard to relationship. After morning prayers, women pack baskets full with fish to transport inland and sell. The women travel as far as Makeni and Kono to sell their fish, dried to endure the one to two days’ journey. Women spend the night drying these fish (they chew kola nuts to stay awake), seasoned with salt to withstand the dusty and treacherous roads to communities that have no access to saltwater. Salt with monosodium glutamate is used as a preservative.

The men and young boys suffer the daily grind of being fishermen. Since being a fisherman is the most significant source of income, the women must delegate all cooking duties to a daughter, if they have one. The daughters are responsible for day to day running of the household. Once young ladies learn these domestic duties, they are normally given off to older men for marriage.

Water Situation

The only source of water in this community is an unprotected spring. Children seem to be primarily responsible for fetching water for their families. It takes about 20 minutes to get through the line and fill a five-gallon container. These children use a small bowl or cup to scoop water directly from the spring, but the difficulty is getting down the steep slope to the spring itself! Once home, the water is separated into containers according to use. Drinking water is covered and kept up off the ground, and water for domestic use is kept in an open bucket.

A clinic was opened just because there are so many medical crises in this community. Community members use the beach to relieve themselves and water is left uncovered, among many other bad habits. The rate of typhoid and dysentery is high, and skin discoloration and missing hair is a common sight. Children are running around with bloated stomachs and pale skin.

Sanitation Situation

No more than half of households have a latrine. The branches of coconut palm leaves are woven together to make latrine walls, and a hole is dug in the center. Locals can only dig a few feet until they meet water, since they are so close to the ocean. This discourages households from digging latrines in the first place. Thus, disease spreads at an alarming rate.

Only a few households have important tools like hand-washing stations, dish racks, and clotheslines. The majority of people throw their trash in the ocean.

Denke Kenah is a 70-year-old famous folklore storyteller who lives in this community. He is known all over the country! He is knowledgeable about each tribe and its history. He says that his people have “no knowledge of what is healthy and unhealthy. Children walk around with no shoes, no pants… The unsuspecting children expose [themselves] to worms, bacteria… We are thankful of the effort your organization is making in providing clean water and educating my people on how to live a healthy life.”

Plans: Hygiene and Sanitation Training

Community members will be trained on hygiene and sanitation. We plan to include the local school’s child health club to help teach about good health. We are in the process of checking this area for teachers, and plan to make sure any and all teachers attend this training. Training professional trainers will be crucial in such a desperate community! When we are not there, the teachers can continue to share what they learned.

The facilitator plans to use the PHAST (Participatory Hygiene and Sanitation Training) method to teach about the following topics and others:

– Dangers of open defecation

– Importance of facilities like latrines and bathing rooms

– Steps of proper hand-washing

– How to prepare, handle, and store food properly

– Disease transmission and how to stop it

Since this is such a large community, we are considering extra training sessions. The plan is to train for three days, four hours a day. We ask that each training participant bring their own container to learn how to build a hand-washing station.

Plans: New Well

This community is huge. This will be the second borehole we have drilled in this community. It will be drilled in a location agreed on by the community: #28 Kamara Taylor Street. This is located further down the street from the first well, giving many more community members the opportunity to access clean, safe water. We will use an LS200 drill rig, and finish the well with an India Mark II pump.

The people in this community are so thankful. They have been thirsty for so long! They have also been hurt by so many broken promises. They are excited beyond belief to have us drilling this well. It is a privilege to be able to drill this well and be part of the greater good for this community.

Project Updates


12/19/2017: A Year Later: #28 Kamara Taylor Street

A year ago, generous donors helped build a new well with the community surrounding #28 Kamara Taylor Street in Sierra Leone. Because of these gifts and contributions from our monthly donors, partners can visit project sites throughout the year, strengthening relationships with communities and evaluating the actual water project. These consistent visits allow us to learn vital lessons and hear amazing stories – we’re excited to share this one from our partner, Nanay Mansaray, with you.


The Water Project : 5088_yar_2


Project Photos


Project Type

Borehole and Hand Pump

Girls and women walk long distances for water when safe water is very often right under their feet! Underground rivers, called aquifers, often contain a constant supply of safe water – but you have to get to it. No matter what machine or piece of equipment is used, all drilling is aiming for a borehole that reaches into an aquifer. If the aquifer has water - and after the well is developed - we are able to pull water to the surface utilizing a hand-pump. If all goes as planned, the community is left with a safe, closed water source providing around 5 gallons of water a minute through a hand-pump.


A Year Later: #28 Kamara Taylor Street

November, 2017

My life has been changed a lot since this project was completed in our community because I have access to safe and clean water every time I want and I also go to school on time.

Keeping The Water Promise

There's an incredible community of monthly donors who have come alongside you in supporting clean water in #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project.

This giving community supports ongoing sustainability programs that help #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project maintain access to safe, reliable water. Together, they keep The Water Promise.

We’re confident you'll love joining this world-changing group committed to sustainability!

Give Monthly

A year ago, generous donors helped build a new well with the community surrounding #28 Kamara Taylor Street in Sierra Leone. Because of these gifts and contributions from our monthly donors, partners can visit project sites throughout the year, strengthening relationships with communities and evaluating the actual water project. These consistent visits allow us to learn vital lessons and hear amazing stories – we’re excited to share this one from our partner, Nanay Mansaray, with you.

You can see that daily life of the community has improved because people are still using their tippy taps, hanging their clothes on a clothesline rope, using a digging pit for their waste disposal and even building kitchen drying racks for food preparation. These changes were caused through this water project and the health education training that was introduced in their community.

Using tippy-tap

The community is finding the new well provides water for more than just safe drinking. “A big change in our community happened when we are about to build the mosque” says caretaker Pa Issa Koroma. “We didn’t go down the hill to fetch water we just easily fetch water from the pump for the construction of the mosque. Plus, the community people fetch clean and safe water for consumption and cooking.”

9-year-old Kai Kamara shares how he has been affected by access to safe water. “My life has been changed a lot since this project was completed in our community because I have access to safe and clean water every time I want and I also go to school on time,” Kai explains. “Even in our house we have clothesline, use the toilet and we wash our hands. Now children are not allowed to defecate around the house. So, for these reason our lives have been changed.”

This community still needs to improve on their sanitation practices. Some toilets are still not roofed and there are no covers on the mouth of the pit latrine. Our staff will continue to chlorinate the well every three months, monitor and maintain the well if needed.

The Water Project and our partners are committed to consistent monitoring of each water source. Our monitoring and evaluation program, made possible by monthly donors, allows us to visit communities up to 4 times a year. Read more about our program and how you can help.


Navigating through intense dry spells, performing preventative maintenance, conducting quality repairs when needed and continuing to assist community leaders to manage water points are all normal parts of keeping projects sustainable. The Water Promise community supports ongoing sustainability programs that help #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project maintain access to safe, reliable water.

We’d love for you to join this world-changing group committed to sustainability.

The most impactful way to continue your support of #28 Kamara Taylor Street New Well Project – and hundreds of other places just like this – is by joining our community of monthly givers.

Your monthly giving will help provide clean water, every month... keeping The Water Promise!

Give Monthly


Contributors

National Art Honors Society at Old Mill High School
Living Word Shanghai Gr. 5 & 6
Data Abstract Solutions, Inc.
Warren Hills Regional High School/Human Rights Club
Bronx Charter School for Excellence
Madison High School
Bellmore Girl Scouts Troop 947
2016 VBS
Old Trail School
DST Los Angeles South Bay Alumnae Chapter
Huntington Independent School District
Urban Community School
St. Patrick School
Columbus Air Force Base Chapel Father's Day Donation
The Hermosillo Family
2G - Room Helpers - 2016
Jubilee Christian School
Sigma Theta Tau International, Upsilon Kappa Chapter
92 individual donor(s)