Join These Folks and Start Your Own Fundraiser

She Did What for Water?

Stacey’s dream; to raise enough money to help The Water Project build a well to provide clean, safe water to a community in Africa.

She’s committed to seeing it happen.

Really committed… like… shave her head committed.

Stacey’s put all her hair on the line on the floor.  She promised to chop off her “blonde locks” in return for donations to her water well fundraising campaign, and even before she’s hit her goal, Stacey has kept that promise!!

Stacey says she’s “trading something that is very valuable to me, to give others a chance at life!”

In addition to inspiring her friends to give, all that beautiful blonde hair is now on its way to creating a wig for a cancer patient – doubling the good!

Now it’s your turn.

Help Stacey Fund a Well like This!

Stacey’s close friends worked really hard to raise over $1,800.  But there’s still a ways to go to reach the goal.

You can join in by donating to her fundraising page.  Together, you’ll fund a water well in Kenya, helping unlock potential in a developing community. You’ll help Stacey achieve her goal and you’ll change the lives of hundreds of people.

…and you don’t even need to harm a hair on your own head (unless you want to, which would be cool, so send a video).


Well by Well – We Can Do That

We all know how much our military men and women give in service to our country, but LT Jared N. Smith, Command Chaplain in the Naval Air Facility El Centro, also encourages his congregation to give generously to important causes like The Water Project.

The Navy must donate the congregation’s weekly collection to non- profit organizations, and Jared makes sure that they give to local, national, and global causes.  After hearing about The Water Project from a donation his brother made and learning more about water scarcity, Jared decided to give some of the congregation’s funds to fight water scarcity.

Jared says that the water crisis is something that some Navy men and women have experienced firsthand. Before entering the military, he had such an experience. Jared spent three weeks in the Democratic Republic of Congo where he saw people walk miles for dirty water with no clean water available. “The most motivating factor for me to give is that I have seen the people who are impacted by this work, and I encourage those who have had these experiences to tell our stories of the people affected.”

LT Jared N. Smith, Command Chaplain in the Naval Air Facility El Centro

The money that Jared’s congregation donates is given to be used wherever it is needed.  He says it’s important to support the effort however necessary because addressing water scarcity is one of the most effective ways to fight poverty.

His humility and the generosity of his congregation just add to the admiration we hold for our service men and women who give so selflessly in so many ways. Jared believes that we can all work to end the water crisis.

Knowing how tirelessly our men and women of the military work can inspire us all to do our part in ending this crisis. As Jared says, it will happen if we continue our hard work. “There’s no reason we cannot provide clean water to everyone in the world who needs it. . . well by well, town by town, village by village, country by country, we can do that.”

A school in Uganda is receiving clean water in part from the donations from Jared’s congregation. Check it out here. And give a salute in honor of Jared and our friends at the Chapel in El Centro.

Overture: An Evening at Classen HS Wish Week

Last Monday, around 8pm I walked into a small coffee shop in Oklahoma City. Most nights “The Bean and Leaf” is a sleepy restaurant tucked between a liquor store and a closed down burger joint, but that night it was positively humming with activity.

The place was packed from wall to wall for Classen High School’s “Wish Week” Open Mic Night. “Wish Week” is five beautiful days where the students of Classen come together and put on a variety of amazing events and crazy fundraisers to raise money for clean water.

Throughout the night there were songs, poems, and some really impressive art work all created by the students at Classen. To be honest, not all of it was “American Idol” perfect. It didn’t have to be. There were plenty of wrong notes, miffed lyrics, and shaky hands delivering poems in public that were written in private. But the night was so much bigger than that, the things that brought us together more grand. Out of tune guitars were soon fixed and there was never an awkward silence that didn’t receive a reassuring laugh and cheer from the crowd.

Last Monday, for about 3 hours, we were a family. What mattered was a cause that brought us together. Every piece of art, every stanza, every song (good and bad) was our way of dreaming up a new world together. A world where every one has access to something as simple, beautiful, and powerful as clean water. Our open mic night had become the overture for a symphony about to play out across the world.

Students of Classen SAS Wish Week Fundraising Crew

By this Friday, the students of this small inner city high school are going to have raised their goal of $10,000. I won’t be surprised if they beat it. Their power comes from a community who are beginning to realize their creative potential to do good in the world around them.

My hope is that you would join us in doing the same.

You can start your own Wish Week or other campaign too…

Ryan Groves
Wishing Well

From Brownie Points to Well Wishes — Rylie’s Story

Rylie’s Girl Scout troop worked together to learn about the water crisis and contribute to a well project.

Have you ever felt like you can’t possibly make a difference? Oftentimes we feel powerless to make any lasting impact in the world we live in, but 4th grader Rylie refused to believe that.  She educated others and brought people together with the common goal of raising money to build a well.  Rylie proves that together we can do great things and shows that the power of determination can be stronger than any perceived obstacle.

Rylie first became involved with the Water Project in 2011 while her Brownie troop was working on a badge.  The girls learned about the scarcity of clean water in much of the world, and they contributed funds from their cookies sales to the project.  Their contribution in and of itself is wonderful, but what is most impressive is the knowledge that Rylie carried forward from that experience.

Last year her 4th grade class studied the global impact of clean water, and the children were overwhelmed by the problem.  They wanted to do something to help, but they felt there was no way they could make an impact.  That is, until Rylie stepped forward and told her story.