Loading images...
The Water Project: Mwangaza Secondary School -
The Water Project: Mwangaza Secondary School -
The Water Project: Mwangaza Secondary School -
The Water Project: Mwangaza Secondary School -
The Water Project: Mwangaza Secondary School -
The Water Project: Mwangaza Secondary School -
The Water Project: Mwangaza Secondary School -
The Water Project: Mwangaza Secondary School -
The Water Project: Mwangaza Secondary School -
The Water Project: Mwangaza Secondary School -
The Water Project: Mwangaza Secondary School -
The Water Project: Mwangaza Secondary School -
The Water Project: Mwangaza Secondary School -
The Water Project: Mwangaza Secondary School -
The Water Project: Mwangaza Secondary School -
The Water Project: Mwangaza Secondary School -
The Water Project: Mwangaza Secondary School -
The Water Project: Mwangaza Secondary School -
The Water Project: Mwangaza Secondary School -
The Water Project: Mwangaza Secondary School -
The Water Project: Mwangaza Secondary School -
The Water Project: Mwangaza Secondary School -
The Water Project: Mwangaza Secondary School -
The Water Project: Mwangaza Secondary School -
The Water Project: Mwangaza Secondary School -
The Water Project: Mwangaza Secondary School -
The Water Project: Mwangaza Secondary School -
The Water Project: Mwangaza Secondary School -
The Water Project: Mwangaza Secondary School -
The Water Project: Mwangaza Secondary School -
The Water Project: Mwangaza Secondary School -
The Water Project: Mwangaza Secondary School -
The Water Project: Mwangaza Secondary School -
The Water Project: Mwangaza Secondary School -
The Water Project: Mwangaza Secondary School -
The Water Project: Mwangaza Secondary School -
The Water Project: Mwangaza Secondary School -
The Water Project: Mwangaza Secondary School -

Project Status



Project Type:  Rainwater Catchment

Regional Program: Western Kenya WaSH Program

Impact: 242 Served

Project Phase:  In Service - Dec 2016

Functionality Status:  Functional

Last Checkup: 07/31/2019

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



Community Profile

This project is a part of our shared program with Western Water And Sanitation Forum (WEWASAFO). Our team is pleased to directly share the below report (edited for clarity, as needed).

Welcome to the School

Mwangaza Secondary School is a public school with both day and boarding students. It is located along the highway in Shibuli Village, Shibuli sub-location, Central Butsotso location, Lurambi Sub-County of Kakamega County. Because of the school’s accessible location, staff commutes from home on a daily basis. The school was founded in the year 1991 as “Ebuchinga Secondary School” under the sponsorship of the Church of God Faithful. In 2010, the school underwent a name change from Ebuchinga to Mwangaza. The school has a total population of 220 students; 150 girls and 70 boys. Mwangaza Secondary School employs 15 teachers, comprised of seven males and eight females. They are also currently hosting six interns who are getting teaching practice. In addition, the school has seven support staff: two security guards, an accountant, a secretary, a groundsman and two cooks.

The community around the school relies on sugarcane farming to make a living. A normal day for students starts early. Students arrive at school in order to start fetching water from the neighboring Ebuchinga Primary School’s borehole. This water is used for the school’s daily needs as well as for cleaning classrooms and latrines. After enough water is gathered, classes start and then stretch to the end of day, only to be interrupted by tea and lunch breaks.

Water Situation

Mwangaza Secondary School has no water source in the school; they lack any connection to piped water, nor do they have a water storage facility that can adequately serve the school’s needs. As a result of this dire shortage, the pupils must assist the two cooks in fetching water from a community well located down the street in Ebuchinga Primary School.

The water from Ebuchinga Primary isn’t very clean, and has resulted in many cases of typhoid; not only among students but also among teachers: the most recent case being Mr. Shitote, a new teacher in the school diagnosed with typhoid. Teachers thus opt to individually buy or carry their own drinking water from home, and the students have no option but to consume the water from the neighboring well. At times, the primary school’s well pump is locked, putting the students in a dilemma not knowing where to find water for school chores. When the primary school’s well pump is broken, it is the Mwangaza Secondary’s sole responsibility to repair it, since they ‘borrow’ the pump. Enrollment at Mwangaza Secondary School is low, since students prefer schools with better water and sanitation facilities.

When water is delivered back to the school, it is consolidated into 100-liter drums located in the kitchen. Students and staff have not yet been educated on water treatment methods, so they drink the water without boiling, chlorinating, or filtering. Cases of typhoid, cholera, diarrhea, and stomachaches are commonly reported.

Sanitation Situation

The school has a total of six functional latrines and one urinal; two latrines and the urinal serve the boys, while two are for the girls. The remaining two latrines are for the teachers. Comparing the situation on the ground versus the WHO standard of 25 girls per door and 30 boys per door, the school is in dire need. This especially affects the 150 girls, who waste a long time waiting in lines for the two latrines. Water inaccessibility at the school has also led to dangerous conditions inside the latrines, with a bad odor from irregular cleaning.

There’s only one hand-washing facility with a damaged tap, which is solely for the teachers’ use. The students have nowhere to wash their own hands after visiting the latrine, and are thus exposed to infections and diseases. At lunch and tea break, the students all share the water in an open container to wash their utensils.

A newly employed teacher was extremely surprised with the bad conditions. They immediately took to representing the school and its need to the county executives, who later presented the need to us. After an initial visit, we were easily able to agree that the secondary school is in need of a water, sanitation, and hygiene project.

Plans: Hygiene and Sanitation Training

Parents, teachers, and students will be trained for two days of sessions on hygiene and sanitation.

This training is meant to equip participants with the skills needed to practice good hygiene, and to promote these practices among peers and the greater community. The end goal is to eliminate water and hygiene-related diseases!

The facilitator plans to use PHAST (Participatory Hygiene and Sanitation Training), CTC (child to child), discussions, lectures, and demonstrations to teach topics including but not limited to disease transmission, hand-washing, and water treatment. The CTC method will prepare students to lead other students into healthy habits, as well as kickstart a CTC club for the school.

Plans: Rainwater Catchment Tank

A 30,000-liter rainwater catchment tank will be constructed on school grounds. Teachers, students, and parents will gather the local materials needed for this project, including sand, ballast, bricks, and hardcore. This contribution will fuel a sense of responsibility for the school and community to take care of their new facilities. Once materials are mobilized, the WEWASAFO team will arrive to lead the construction effort.

Plans: VIP Latrines

Two triple-door latrines will be constructed, providing three new latrines for each gender. Latrine materials will be mobilized the same way as the tank, ensuring the school feels these facilities are truly theirs.

Plans: Hand-Washing Stations

Two hand-washing stations will be delivered to the school before training. These come in the form of two 60-liter containers fitted with a tap. The training facilitator will demonstrate how to properly wash hands, and then students will have a chance to practice in groups. The CTC club will be responsible for filling the hand-washing containers on a daily basis.

The actions described above will give students an environment that is conducive to learning. This is an opportunity they deserve!

Project Updates


12/20/2017: A Year Later: Mwangaza Secondary School

A year ago, generous donors helped build a rainwater catchment system and latrines for Mwangaza Secondary School in Western Kenya. Because of these gifts and contributions from our monthly donors, partners can visit project sites throughout the year, strengthening relationships with communities and evaluating the actual water project. These consistent visits allow us to learn vital lessons and hear amazing stories – we’re excited to share this one from our partner, Christine Luvandwa, with you.


The Water Project : 4617_yar_3


Project Photos


Project Type

Rainwater Catchment

Rainwater is collected off strategic areas of a roof, enters a custom guttering system (which filters out debris) and leads to a storage tank. Tanks can vary in sizes and are determined by population and average rainfall patterns. Water can be stored for months, is easily treated in the tank, and is accessible through taps. These projects are implemented at schools with proper roof lines and gutter systems to make them successful.


A Year Later: Mwangaza Secondary School

November, 2017

The water is very clean, safe for consumption by all people without worry of contracting any water related diseases. The environment is very clean, the students and the school has really worked to see to it that the place is kept very clean, thus providing an ample learning environment.

Keeping The Water Promise

There's an incredible community of monthly donors who have come alongside you in supporting clean water in Mwangaza Secondary School.

This giving community supports ongoing sustainability programs that help Mwangaza Secondary School maintain access to safe, reliable water. Together, they keep The Water Promise.

We’re confident you'll love joining this world-changing group committed to sustainability!

Give Monthly

A year ago, generous donors helped build a rainwater catchment system and latrines for Mwangaza Secondary School in Western Kenya. Because of these gifts and contributions from our monthly donors, partners can visit project sites throughout the year, strengthening relationships with communities and evaluating the actual water project. These consistent visits allow us to learn vital lessons and hear amazing stories – we’re excited to share this one from our partner, Christine Luvandwa, with you.


Mwangaza Secondary School is very clean, on entering the school compound we were amazed at the level of cleanliness and orderliness. Everything seemed to be in its rightful place and the students were very neat. Given that water is the main requirement to ensuring a high standard of hygiene is maintained, this water project has greatly contributed to this achievement as the harvested rain water is being used for drinking, cooking and cleaning. The sanitation platforms are also very useful as they have eased the strain that was previously being experienced by the school population reducing the amount of time wasted lining up during brake times to access the facilities.

CTC (child-to-child) Patron Charles Indakwa Chiteri shared, “the school has experienced less problems with water shortage, which has been a great challenge in the previous years, and now we are glad to report that there is plenty of water for cooking, drinking and also cleaning. With the excitement with which the students have embraced the project, plenty of reports about any problem that the students encounter with the facilities is immediately reported to the school administration without delay, and this has enabled us to maintain the facilities properly.”

“I am now more confident to look and talk about health and hygiene, since I understood the basics and importance of health at all levels,” shared 20-year-old Christabel Ayuma Shituya. “The things I practice at school are the same things I practice at home. As the president of the Child to Child club in school, I now have the confidence to address people and we have managed to recruit more members. I stay clean because I know I have to lead by example. This has greatly improved my relationship with other students.”

The water is very clean, safe for consumption by all people without worry of contracting any water related diseases. The environment, as mentioned earlier, is very clean, the students and the school has really worked to see to it that the place is kept very clean, thus providing an ample learning environment. All this has given the school a face lift and an image admirable by other schools and especially primary school pupils who are yearning to join high school.

Refresher training needs to be done for the school, just as a reminder for the students on the importance of sanitation. Continuous support by our team representatives for some of the club meetings in the school can greatly help mentor more students to take up leadership in different areas in the school as well.


The Water Project and our partners are committed to consistent monitoring of each water source. Our monitoring and evaluation program, made possible by monthly donors, allows us to visit communities up to 4 times a year. Read more about our program and how you can help.


Navigating through intense dry spells, performing preventative maintenance, conducting quality repairs when needed and continuing to assist community leaders to manage water points are all normal parts of keeping projects sustainable. The Water Promise community supports ongoing sustainability programs that help Mwangaza Secondary School maintain access to safe, reliable water.

We’d love for you to join this world-changing group committed to sustainability.

The most impactful way to continue your support of Mwangaza Secondary School – and hundreds of other places just like this – is by joining our community of monthly givers.

Your monthly giving will help provide clean water, every month... keeping The Water Promise!

Give Monthly