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The Water Project: Nakhabale Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Nakhabale Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Nakhabale Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Nakhabale Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Nakhabale Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Nakhabale Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Nakhabale Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Nakhabale Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Nakhabale Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Nakhabale Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Nakhabale Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Nakhabale Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Nakhabale Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Nakhabale Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Nakhabale Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Nakhabale Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Nakhabale Spring Catchment Project -
The Water Project: Nakhabale Spring Catchment Project -

Project Status



Project Type:  Protected Spring

Program: IcFEM Water Projects

Impact: 500 Served

Project Phase: 
Community Managed
Implementing Partner Monitoring Data Unavailable
Initial Installation: Oct 2013

Project Features


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Community Profile

This project is part of IcFEM’s WaSH program, which includes multiple water source schemes as well as substantial community level hygiene promotion, and training on project operation and maintenance. 

What follows is a brief project outline direct from our partner: 

The spring is found in Misikhu Friends village of Makhese location in Bungoma County. The area is well endowed with rainfall, rich agricultural land and booming business at Misikhu shopping centre along the Kitale-Webuye road.

However, poverty is endemic especially in the villages where the spring is found mainly due to insufficient capital for investment. The residents here are mainly small scale farmers growing maize for food and small quantities of sugarcane for milling.

Maseno/Nakhabale spring serves a segment of this poor population who have no other source of water. The next source is about 2 kilometres away-a long distance to cover in search of water. Thus, they have to make do with what is available to them. The spring has never been protected and the water forms a shallow basin from where the water is scooped. The residents are concerned about its safety but can do very little about it. They have welcomed the intervention saying that this would bring healing to their land.

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Project Photos


Project Type

Protected Spring

In many communities, natural springs exist as water flows from cracks in rocky ground or the side of a hill.  Springs provide reliable water but that doesn’t mean safe. When left open they become contaminated by surface contamination, animal and human waste and rain runoff. The solution is to protect the source. First, you excavate around the exact source area of the spring. Then, you build a protective reservoir for water flow, which pours through a reinforced pipe in a concrete headwall to a paved collection area. Safe water typically flows year-round and there is very limited ongoing maintenance needed!