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The Water Project: Ibinzo Community, Lucia Spring -  Water Flowing
The Water Project: Ibinzo Community, Lucia Spring -  Water Flowing
The Water Project: Ibinzo Community, Lucia Spring -  Water Flowing
The Water Project: Ibinzo Community, Lucia Spring -  Water Flowing
The Water Project: Ibinzo Community, Lucia Spring -  Water Flowing
The Water Project: Ibinzo Community, Lucia Spring -  Water Flowing
The Water Project: Ibinzo Community, Lucia Spring -  Water Flowing
The Water Project: Ibinzo Community, Lucia Spring -  Water Flowing
The Water Project: Ibinzo Community, Lucia Spring -  Water Flowing
The Water Project: Ibinzo Community, Lucia Spring -  Finished Spring Protection
The Water Project: Ibinzo Community, Lucia Spring -  Finished Sanitation Platform
The Water Project: Ibinzo Community, Lucia Spring -  Sanitation Platform Drying
The Water Project: Ibinzo Community, Lucia Spring -  Pit Prepared For New Latrine
The Water Project: Ibinzo Community, Lucia Spring -  Spring Construction
The Water Project: Ibinzo Community, Lucia Spring -  Spring Construction
The Water Project: Ibinzo Community, Lucia Spring -  Spring Construction
The Water Project: Ibinzo Community, Lucia Spring -  Spring Construction
The Water Project: Ibinzo Community, Lucia Spring -  A Boy Carries Bricks Down To The Artisans
The Water Project: Ibinzo Community, Lucia Spring -  Spring Excavation
The Water Project: Ibinzo Community, Lucia Spring -  Spring Excavation
The Water Project: Ibinzo Community, Lucia Spring -  Posing For A Group Picture
The Water Project: Ibinzo Community, Lucia Spring -  Spring Care Training
The Water Project: Ibinzo Community, Lucia Spring -  Training
The Water Project: Ibinzo Community, Lucia Spring -  Dental Hygiene Training
The Water Project: Ibinzo Community, Lucia Spring -  Handwashing Training
The Water Project: Ibinzo Community, Lucia Spring -  Handwashing Training
The Water Project: Ibinzo Community, Lucia Spring -  Training
The Water Project: Ibinzo Community, Lucia Spring -  Training
The Water Project: Ibinzo Community, Lucia Spring -  Training
The Water Project: Ibinzo Community, Lucia Spring -  Feeding A Bunny
The Water Project: Ibinzo Community, Lucia Spring -  Clothes Drying On Ground
The Water Project: Ibinzo Community, Lucia Spring -  Family Stands By Dish Rack
The Water Project: Ibinzo Community, Lucia Spring -  Mud Latrine
The Water Project: Ibinzo Community, Lucia Spring -  Carrying Water
The Water Project: Ibinzo Community, Lucia Spring -  Carrying Water
The Water Project: Ibinzo Community, Lucia Spring -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Ibinzo Community, Lucia Spring -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Ibinzo Community, Lucia Spring -  Fetching Water
The Water Project: Ibinzo Community, Lucia Spring -  Community Landscape
The Water Project: Ibinzo Community, Lucia Spring -  Household
The Water Project: Ibinzo Community, Lucia Spring -  Community Children
The Water Project: Ibinzo Community, Lucia Spring -  Household

Project Status



Project Type:  Protected Spring

Regional Program: Western Kenya WaSH Program

Impact: 420 Served

Project Phase:  In Service - May 2019

Functionality Status:  Functional

Last Checkup: 06/06/2019

Project Features


Click icons to learn about each feature.



It was a very hot and sunny day when we first visited Ibinzo Community. We were forced to look for shade and rest quite a few times.

There are 245 people living in this area, with the average family size being seven to eight. All of these people rely on dirty water from Lucia Spring.

Lucia Spring is open to all kinds of contamination, and the water is visibly filthy. Imagining how the young ones, women, and men are consuming such water is heartbreaking. People in this community suffer a lot.

Most of the community members suffer from typhoid after drinking this unsafe water. The poor drainage at these water points creates a breeding ground for mosquitoes, and those who live nearby suffer from malaria. “Majority of us do not treat the water from the spring. All this for decades has posed danger to our health and some have died prematurely due to contracting diseases such as typhoid,” said Mrs. Mercyline Mbone.

“Consuming water from this unprotected water source has always posed dangers to our health,” said Mr. Joseph Ndeta.

“The most-affected are the pregnant mothers and the children. We have used a lot of resources to cater for medication purposes, thus leaving our community underdeveloped.”

Health issues caused by dirty water cause breadwinners to miss out on providing for their families. They need their health to grow and sell vegetables, raise poultry, and run their motorbike taxi businesses.

What we can do:

Training

“This community’s hygiene and sanitation condition is very poor,” admitted Mrs. Mercyline Mbone.

“We do not have permanent toilets, the floor is made of mud which makes it difficult to clean the surface, and most of the community members do not wash their hands when they visit the toilets.”

Community members will attend hygiene and sanitation training for at least two days. This training will ensure participants have the knowledge they need about healthy practices and their importance. The facilitator plans to use PHAST (Participatory Hygiene and Sanitation Transformation), CLTS (Community-Led Total Sanitation), ABCD (Asset-Based Community Development), group discussions, handouts, and demonstrations at the spring. One of the most important topics we plan to cover is the handling, storage, and treatment of water. Having a clean water source will be extremely helpful, but it is useless if water gets contaminated by the time it’s consumed.

Training will also result in the formation of a committee that will oversee operations and maintenance at the spring. They will enforce proper behavior around the spring and delegate tasks that will help preserve the site, such as building a fence and digging proper drainage. The fence will keep out destructive animals, and the drainage will keep the area’s mosquito population at a minimum.

Sanitation Platforms

Less than 70% of households have their own private place to use the bathroom. Those who do not have a pit latrine go outside in the bushes.

On the final day of training, participants will select five families that should most benefit from new latrine floors.

Training will also inform the community and selected families on what they need to contribute to make this project a success. They must mobilize locally available materials, such as bricks, clean sand, hardcore, and ballast. The five families chosen for sanitation platforms must prepare by sinking a pit for the sanitation platforms to be placed over. All community members must work together to make sure that accommodations and food are always provided for the work teams.

Spring Protection

Protecting the spring will ensure that the water is safe, adequate and secure. Construction will keep surface runoff and other contaminants out of the water. With the community’s high involvement in the process, there should be a good sense of responsibility and ownership for the new clean water source.

Fetching water is predominantly a female role, done by both women and young girls. Protecting the spring and offering training and support will, therefore, help empower the female members of the community by giving them more time and efforts to engage and invest in income-generating activities.

Project Updates


05/07/2019: Ibinzo Community, Lucia Spring Project Complete

Ibinzo Community is celebrating its new protected spring, so celebrate with them! Lucia Spring has been transformed into a flowing, safe source of water thanks to your donation. The spring is protected from contamination, five sanitation platforms have been provided for the community, and training has been done on sanitation and hygiene.

Spring Protection

Construction at Lucia Spring was successful and water is now flowing from the discharge pipe.

“We are so glad to have this water point! Now I know water-related diseases will be out of this community. Initially, we had been suffering from the menace of waterborne diseases like typhoid and diarrhea. We have been using a lot of family resources to treat our loved ones which increased our poverty level,” Village Elder Ndeta recalled.

“Now that we can get clean and safe water, our hygiene and sanitation standards will improve and poverty levels for this community will reduce because we shall use our resources to generate more income and enhance our lives. Thank you for bringing joy in our community!”

Ibinzo Community is very happy about the project. They promised to form a self-help group and will use the water drainage from the spring to make a fish pond since there is a high demand for fish in the community. They will sell the fish and generate income.

They are planning to register the group and get a certificate from the government, which will give them access to government grants that they will use to boost their fish farming and engage in more income-generating activities like poultry farming, banana growing, and many other things. Because of this, they are projecting to increase their living standards and eradicate poverty in their community.

The Process:

Community members provided all locally available construction materials, e.g bricks, clean sand, wheelbarrows of ballast, and gravel. Some even made extra efforts to work alongside the artisan after delivering all of the materials. Community members also hosted our artisans for the duration of construction.

Carrying bricks down to the artisan

The spring area was excavated with jembes, hoes, and spades to create space for setting the foundation of polyethylene, wire mesh, and concrete.

After the base had been set, both wing walls and the headwall were set in place using brickwork. The discharge pipe was fixed low in place through the headwall to direct the water from the reservoir to the drawing area.

As the wing walls and headwall cured, the stairs were set and ceramic tiles were fixed directly below the discharge pipe.

The ceramic tiles installed under the discharge pipe protect the concrete from the erosive force of the falling water and beautify the spring. The process of plastering the headwall and wing walls on both sides reinforces the brickwork and prevents water from the reservoir from seeping through the walls and allows pressure to build in the collection box to push water up through the discharge pipe.

The concrete dried over the course of five days, during which a community member wetted the concrete to make sure it would dry without cracking. The source area was filled up with clean stones and sand and covered with a polyethylene membrane to eliminate any potential sources of contamination.

After the backfilling was done at the reservoir area, the community members were already waiting and ready with poles and nails to help the artisan fence in the area.

Sanitation Platforms

All five sanitation platforms have been installed and make wonderful, easy to clean latrine floors. These five families are happy about this milestone of having a latrine of their own. We will continue to encourage them to finish building walls and roofs over their new latrine floors as we visit for monitoring and evaluation.

New Knowledge

During construction, we asked the village elder to mobilize participants for a hygiene and sanitation training session. Attendance was as expected since we asked the community itself to give us the ideal time for training.

It was cold early in the morning but as the day progressed, it became hot and sunny. But since we conducted the training under a large mango tree where there was cool shade, the environment was still comfortable for the participants. All of the participants seemed to be very interested in the training and were busy making notes and nodding their heads whenever the facilitator made a point.

Participants learned about:

– Leadership and governance for the spring committee
– Management and maintenance of the spring

For this topic, the facilitator did an onsite training to show people the parts of the spring and to teach them how to operate and maintain the water source so that it will serve future generations.

Village leadership was there and said that they will formulate some rules concerning the care and maintenance of this facility, and whoever breaches those rules should pay a fine. That money will then go into a savings account for any repairs when they are needed.

– Family planning
– Personal hygiene, including handwashing

Participants follow along as the trainer demonstrates handwashing

– Dental hygiene

Participants enjoyed any topic that included demonstrations. Everyone wanted to get up and volunteer during both the handwashing training and toothbrushing training.

– Waterborne and water-related disease, along with water treatment methods

“I’m glad to be among those who attended this training. I have learned a lot of information concerning hygiene, leadership, the importance of community participation and collaboration, and how to take care of the spring,” recounted Mrs. Tunde.

“Initially, I did not know the ten steps of handwashing, nor I did not know how to brush my teeth correctly. Now that I know, I will exercise these lessons and train others on the same. I promise that the sanitation and hygiene for my family and this society at large will improve.”

Thank You for making all of this possible!


The Water Project : 29-kenya19110-water-flowing


02/26/2019: Ibinzo Community, Lucia Spring Project Underway

Dirty water from Lucia Spring is making people in Ibinzo Community sick. Thanks to your generosity, we’re working to build a clean water point and much more.

Get to know this community through the narrative and pictures we’ve posted, and read about this water, sanitation and hygiene project. We look forward to reaching out with news of success!


The Water Project : 5-kenya19110-fetching-water


Project Photos


Project Type

Protected Spring

In many communities, natural springs exist as water flows from cracks in rocky ground or the side of a hill.  Springs provide reliable water but that doesn’t mean safe. When left open they become contaminated by surface contamination, animal and human waste and rain runoff. The solution is to protect the source. First, you excavate around the exact source area of the spring. Then, you build a protective reservoir for water flow, which leads to a concrete spring box and collection area. Safe water typically flows year-round and there is very limited ongoing maintenance needed!